Matching Items (4)

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Social Network Attributes and Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors Among Young Adults in a Diabetes Related Social Group

Description

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of disease management. Many young adults enroll in college where student organizations are prevalent including diabetes related social groups on some campuses, which provide a rich source of social support for students with diabetes as they transition to greater independence in diabetes management. This study used descriptive analysis and personal network analysis (PNA) to investigate which aspects of being a part of a diabetes related social group and personal networks, in general, are pertinent to successful diabetes management, measured by a Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) among 52 young adults with T1DM. The majority of respondents indicated that since being a part of College Diabetes Network (CDN) or another diabetes-related social group, they increased time spent paying attention to, and felt more empowered to make changes to their diabetes management routine, and they were able to generally take better care of their diabetes. Half of respondents noticed their health improved since joining, and over half felt less burdened by their diabetes. Though no personal network measures were highly correlated with higher Diabetes Self-Management Scores, the degree to which health matters were discussed within their personal network was the most associated personal network measure. Our findings help contextualize the ways in which young adults’ DSMB are influenced by participation in diabetes- related social groups, as well as introduce the use of personal network analysis in gauging important aspects of social capital and support in young adults with chronic disease.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Social Network Attributes and Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors Among Young Adults in a Diabetes Related Social Group

Description

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of disease management. Many young adults enroll in college where student organizations are prevalent including diabetes related social groups on some campuses, which provide a rich source of social support for students with diabetes as they transition to greater independence in diabetes management. This study used descriptive analysis and personal network analysis (PNA) to investigate which aspects of being a part of a diabetes related social group and personal networks, in general, are pertinent to successful diabetes management, measured by a Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) among 52 young adults with T1DM. The majority of respondents indicated that since being a part of College Diabetes Network (CDN) or another diabetes-related social group, they increased time spent paying attention to, and felt more empowered to make changes to their diabetes management routine, and they were able to generally take better care of their diabetes. Half of respondents noticed their health improved since joining, and over half felt less burdened by their diabetes. Though no personal network measures were highly correlated with higher Diabetes Self-Management Scores, the degree to which health matters were discussed within their personal network was the most associated personal network measure. Our findings help contextualize the ways in which young adults’ DSMB are influenced by participation in diabetes- related social groups, as well as introduce the use of personal network analysis in gauging important aspects of social capital and support in young adults with chronic disease.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

The Psychological Impact of COVID-19 and its Related Fallout on the Mental Health of Young Adults

Description

COVID-19 has shocked the bedrock of society, impacting both human life and the economy. Accompanying this shock has been the psychological distress inflicted onto the general population as a result

COVID-19 has shocked the bedrock of society, impacting both human life and the economy. Accompanying this shock has been the psychological distress inflicted onto the general population as a result of the emotion strain stemming from isolation/quarantine policies, being sick with COVID-19, dealing with COVID-19 losses, and post-COVID syndrome and its effect on quality of life. The psychological distress has been experienced by the general population, but compared to middle age (30-50) and older adults (>50 years of age), it has been young adults (18-30 years old) who have been more psychologically affected (Glowacz & Schmits, 2020). Psychological distress, specifically anxiety and depression, has been exacerbated by feelings of uncertainty, fear of illness, losing loved ones, and fear of post-COVID syndrome. Post-COVID syndrome, as with other post-viral syndromes such as post viral SARS involve lingering symptoms such as myalgic encephalomyelitis or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), and loss of motivation (Underhill, 2015). In addition to these symptoms, patients suffering from post-COVID syndrome have also presented brain inflammation and damaged brain blood vessels (Meinhardt et al., 2021), Endotheliitis (Varga et al., 2020), CV abnormalities and changes in glucose metabolism (Williams et al., 2020). CV abnormalities and changes in glucose metabolism are connected to chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease respectively. These chronic illnesses are then associated with higher risk for depression as a result of the stress induced by the symptoms and their impact on quality of life (NIMH, 2021). Further monitoring, and research will be important to gauge ultimate physiological and psychological impact of COVID-19.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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A Journey: American Indian Behavioral Health Programs Building Culturally Competent Clinical Skills and Adapting Evidence-Based Treatments

Description

There are federal mandates attached to funding for behavioral health programs that require the use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) to treat mental health disorders in order to improve clinical outcomes.

There are federal mandates attached to funding for behavioral health programs that require the use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) to treat mental health disorders in order to improve clinical outcomes. However, these EBTs have not been constructed with American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) populations. There are over 340 EBTs, and only two outcome controlled studies have demonstrated effectiveness with AI/AN populations to treat mental health disorders. AI/AN communities often have to select an EBT that is not reflective of their culture, language, and traditions. Although EBTs are frequently used in AI/AN communities, little is known about the adaptation process of these interventions with the AI/AN population. For this study, a qualitative design was used to explore how American Indian behavioral health (AIBH) organizations in the Southwest adapted EBTs for cultural relevancy and cultural appropriateness. One urban and two tribal AIBH programs were recruited for the study. Over a six-week period, 24 respondents (practitioners and cultural experts) participated in a semi-structured interview. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative analysis approach. As a result, four themes emerged: 1) attitudes towards EBTs, 2) how to build culturally competent clinical skills, 3) steps to adapt EBTs, and 4) internal and external organizational factors required to adopt EBTs. The four themes identify how to build a culturally responsive behavioral health program in Indian country and are the purview of this dissertation.

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Date Created
  • 2020