Matching Items (9)

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Creating a Peer-Mediated Social Story for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum

This project highlights the importance of students learning and applying social skills in educational settings for students with ASD. Social stories are one method used for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to integrate social skills instruction in classroom settings. Social stories are designed to help a child learn and respond to social cues for successful social interactions. Although, there is limited research on the effectiveness of social stories, research has demonstrated the effectiveness of peer-mediated learning and the effects of positive peer relationships in inclusive early childhood settings. This project draws on the evidence of peer- mediated learning through the medium of social stories to support students with ASD in school settings. This project is the creation of a double-sided social story picture book designed to teach prosocial peer interactions to students with ASD and to teach their peers to support them in learning the specific social skill. The target skill for this peer-mediated social story is learning how to interact with friends in the classroom by initiating and responding to requests to play. \r\nThe project is unique in that this social story includes a section for the student with ASD and a section to support the peer in their role within the social relationship.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Teachers' Responses to Students' Anxiety: How Does it Impact Students' School Experiences?

Description

With an increase in the discussion around mental health in general, there needs to be research geared toward how educational professionals may assist a student who struggles with anxiety symptoms

With an increase in the discussion around mental health in general, there needs to be research geared toward how educational professionals may assist a student who struggles with anxiety symptoms or disorders. This study aimed to determine how students with anxiety and anxiety disorders are impacted by teachers' responses to their anxiety manifestations, both positive and negative, in terms of their school experience. This study also investigated students' suggestions for how teachers may effectively assist a student who struggles with anxiety. This study used self-reported data from students from an honors college via a survey and focus groups in order to investigate these topics. The results found that students value student-teacher relationships and communication, flexibility (accommodations), and empathy from the teacher. Results suggest it is important for teachers to get to know a student and understand his or her challenges before making judgments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Highly Gifted Students in the Sciences: Predicting Academic Proficiency Based on Personality, Conative, and Cognitive Traits

Description

This study sought to identify traits that act as possible predictors of academic science proficiency of highly gifted adolescent students. A combination of cognitive, personality, and conative traits were selected

This study sought to identify traits that act as possible predictors of academic science proficiency of highly gifted adolescent students. A combination of cognitive, personality, and conative traits were selected for evaluation as predictors of scientific proficiency using student General Ability Index (GAI), Revised NEO Personality Index (NEO-PI R), and Kolbe Index scores to evaluate each, respectively. Statistical correlational analyses revealed that high expressions of the conative trait Fact Finder and the personality traits Ideas and Straight-forwardness predicted higher degrees of academic science proficiency. In contrast, lower expressions of the personality traits Excitement Seeking and Order predicted higher degrees of scientific proficiency. Further, stepwise regression confirmed that the NEO-PI R facets of Excitement Seeking and Ideas traits were significant predictors of science proficiency and suggested that the personality trait Vulnerability may also be a predictor. The repeated appearance of the Excitement Seeking and Ideas facets and the dependence of the other identified traits suggests that these traits were the most promising possible predictors of scientific proficiency in highly gifted students and should be the target of future research.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports at Home: A Guide to Using Low Intensity Strategies to Promote Positive Behavior and Relationships within Families

Description

The purpose of this project was to create a resource for parents to introduce them to the PBIS framework that is used in many schools across the country, and to

The purpose of this project was to create a resource for parents to introduce them to the PBIS framework that is used in many schools across the country, and to three low-intensity positive behavior management strategies that can be utilized to prevent problem behaviors at school and home. The three strategies included in the resource are: behavior specific praise, precorrection, and high probability request sequences. All three of these strategies have been shown, through research, to help promote positive relationships between adults and children, and decreased problem behaviors when they are used in the classroom and school settings. Through a literature review that was conducted at the beginning of the project, it was found that there is very little research on the use of the three strategies by parents. This resource could potentially lead to more education and research being done on both the social validity of these strategies and their use in the home setting.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports at Home: A Guide to Using Low Intensity Strategies to Promote Positive Behavior and Relationships within Families

Description

The purpose of this project was to create a resource for parents to introduce them to the PBIS framework that is used in many schools across the country, and to

The purpose of this project was to create a resource for parents to introduce them to the PBIS framework that is used in many schools across the country, and to three low-intensity positive behavior management strategies that can be utilized to prevent problem behaviors at school and home. The three strategies included in the resource are: behavior specific praise, precorrection, and high probability request sequences. All three of these strategies have been shown, through research, to help promote positive relationships between adults and children, and decreased problem behaviors when they are used in the classroom and school settings. Through a literature review that was conducted at the beginning of the project, it was found that there is very little research on the use of the three strategies by parents. This resource could potentially lead to more education and research being done on both the social validity of these strategies and their use in the home setting.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Fun in the Sun Summer Reading Program

Description

Abstract This study examined the participation of 36 second and third grade students from six Title I schools in a summer school reading incentive program. Students attended the summer program

Abstract This study examined the participation of 36 second and third grade students from six Title I schools in a summer school reading incentive program. Students attended the summer program who had not meet the reading requirements for their grade levels by the end of the previous school year. As part of the summer reading program students accessed free books on a variety of topics and earned incentives for bringing the books back and completing reading logs. This summer reading program was four sessions, thirty minutes, once a week during the one-month long summer program. Results indicate students' opinions about reading improved over the duration of the program. Likewise, the average number of books students read per week and the average number of minutes students spent reading per day increased from pre to post intervention. Limitations and implications are reported. Key words: summer reading, reading program, incentives, reducing reading gaps

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Tiniest Tumbleweed

Description

The creative project, The Tiniest Tumbleweed, produces a piece of children's literature in the form of a fully illustrated e-book that can serve as a model for parents, caretakers, and

The creative project, The Tiniest Tumbleweed, produces a piece of children's literature in the form of a fully illustrated e-book that can serve as a model for parents, caretakers, and teachers to bring awareness to the importance of imparting positive self-efficacy concepts to young children. The project uses the work of acclaimed psychologist Albert Bandura in the field of self-efficacy as the theoretical foundation of the story. The theme is clearly stated as striving to be all YOU can be and that achieving one's personal best, "is just fine, just fine indeed." By creating a children's picture book, two things are accomplished; first, children hear an endearing story of a tumbleweed and a sparrow that use principles of positive self-efficacy to overcome adversities in their lives. Second, those who teach children have a tool to use to deliver the message over and over again. The Tiniest Tumbleweed also presents a link to science with photographs of the growth patterns of tumbleweeds and house sparrows in their natural environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Do Arizona Charter Schools Rely on Exclusionary Discipline Practices?

Description

Families of students with disabilities and those who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), are looking for better educational opportunities. Charter schools offer promise as they were designed to promote

Families of students with disabilities and those who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), are looking for better educational opportunities. Charter schools offer promise as they were designed to promote student learning with limited control from the state. Charter schools though, have been criticized for relying on exclusionary discipline policies that affect CLD students and students with disabilities disproportionately. This study was designed to understand how Arizona charter schools use exclusionary discipline practices, with a focus on students with disabilities and CLD students. Two participants, a fourth grade and fifth grade teacher from a Phoenix metropolis charter school completed surveys and interviews where they answered questions about their classroom and their school’s discipline policies. Teachers were asked how they have adapted and administered classroom discipline policies and to what extent have positive behavioral strategies been implemented in an online setting due to the COVID-19 pandemic when schools transitioned to virtual learning. The results showed that in a virtual setting, teachers retained the practice of removing students from the “classroom”, expectations had to be modified to meet the needs of the new environment, and the school counselor served in conflicting roles. The findings suggested that charter schools and teachers may be transferring and adapting their reliance on exclusionary discipline practices even for an online setting with classrooms that have students with disabilities and those who are CLD.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Involve Me! Using Developmentally Appropriate Practices to Support a Rigorous Kindergarten Program: The Effects on Engagement and Attitude

Description

Chi and Wylie’s (2014) Interactive Constructive Active Passive Framework (ICAP) was used as the foundation of a teacher led intervention using small group instruction with manipulatives during mathematics instruction to

Chi and Wylie’s (2014) Interactive Constructive Active Passive Framework (ICAP) was used as the foundation of a teacher led intervention using small group instruction with manipulatives during mathematics instruction to provide developmentally appropriate instruction to kindergarten students in a rigorous academic program. This action research mixed-methods study was conducted in a full-day self-contained kindergarten classroom to ascertain the effects of this mathematics instruction method on students’ levels of engagement and attitudes. Over the course of six months, twenty mathematics lessons were recorded to gather data for the study. Quantitative data included measuring time-on-task, teacher behaviors ICAP level, student behaviors ICAP level, as well as a Student Attitude Survey that was conducted at the conclusion of the study. The Student Attitude Survey was presented in a modified Likert Scale format due to the age and reading ability of the participants. Qualitative data was gathered in the form of lesson transcripts. Twenty-two students and one classroom teacher participated in the study. Students ranged in age from five to six years old, and eleven participants (50%) were male. The results of the study showed that the use of small group hands-on instruction in mathematics had a positive effect on student engagement based on students’ time-on-task during the activity, as well as positive student attitudes toward mathematics as indicated on the Student Attitude Survey. Lesson transcripts and both teacher and student ICAP rubrics provided further support for the innovation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019