Matching Items (6)

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Structural alterations of the brainstem in migraine

Description

Atypical brainstem modulation of pain might contribute to changes in sensory processing typical of migraine. The study objective was to investigate whether migraine is associated with brainstem structural alterations that

Atypical brainstem modulation of pain might contribute to changes in sensory processing typical of migraine. The study objective was to investigate whether migraine is associated with brainstem structural alterations that correlate with this altered pain processing.
MRI T1-weighted images of 55 migraine patients and 58 healthy controls were used to: (1) create deformable mesh models of the brainstem that allow for shape analyses; (2) calculate volumes of the midbrain, pons, medulla and the superior cerebellar peduncles; (3) interrogate correlations between regional brainstem volumes, cutaneous heat pain thresholds, and allodynia symptoms.
Migraineurs had smaller midbrain volumes (healthy controls = 61.28 mm[superscript 3], SD = 5.89; migraineurs = 58.80 mm[superscript 3], SD = 6.64; p = 0.038), and significant (p < 0.05) inward deformations in the ventral midbrain and pons, and outward deformations in the lateral medulla and dorsolateral pons relative to healthy controls. Migraineurs had a negative correlation between ASC-12 allodynia symptom severity with midbrain volume (r = − 0.32; p = 0.019) and a positive correlation between cutaneous heat pain thresholds with medulla (r = 0.337; p = 0.012) and cerebellar peduncle volumes (r = 0.435; p = 0.001).
Migraineurs with greater symptoms of allodynia have smaller midbrain volumes and migraineurs with lower heat pain thresholds have smaller medulla and cerebellar peduncles. The brainstem likely plays a role in altered sensory processing in migraine and brainstem structure might reflect severity of allodynia and hypersensitivity to pain in migraine.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-11-02

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Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma

Description

Background
Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor

Background
Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT), despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM.
Methods
We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs <80% tumor nuclei) for corresponding samples. In a training set, we used three texture analysis algorithms and three ML methods to identify MRI-texture features that optimized model accuracy to distinguish tumor content. We confirmed model accuracy in a separate validation set.
Results
We collected 82 biopsies from 18 GBMs throughout ENH and BAT. The MRI-based model achieved 85% cross-validated accuracy to diagnose high- vs low-tumor in the training set (60 biopsies, 11 patients). The model achieved 81.8% accuracy in the validation set (22 biopsies, 7 patients).
Conclusion
Multi-parametric MRI and texture analysis can help characterize and visualize GBM’s spatial histologic heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-11-24

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Mathematical Analysis of Glioma Growth in a Murine Model

Description

Five immunocompetent C57BL/6-cBrd/cBrd/Cr (albino C57BL/6) mice were injected with GL261-luc2 cells, a cell line sharing characteristics of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The mice were imaged using magnetic resonance (MR) at

Five immunocompetent C57BL/6-cBrd/cBrd/Cr (albino C57BL/6) mice were injected with GL261-luc2 cells, a cell line sharing characteristics of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The mice were imaged using magnetic resonance (MR) at five separate time points to characterize growth and development of the tumor. After 25 days, the final tumor volumes of the mice varied from 12 mm[superscript 3] to 62 mm[superscript 3], even though mice were inoculated from the same tumor cell line under carefully controlled conditions. We generated hypotheses to explore large variances in final tumor size and tested them with our simple reaction-diffusion model in both a 3-dimensional (3D) finite difference method and a 2-dimensional (2D) level set method. The parameters obtained from a best-fit procedure, designed to yield simulated tumors as close as possible to the observed ones, vary by an order of magnitude between the three mice analyzed in detail. These differences may reflect morphological and biological variability in tumor growth, as well as errors in the mathematical model, perhaps from an oversimplification of the tumor dynamics or nonidentifiability of parameters. Our results generate parameters that match other experimental in vitro and in vivo measurements. Additionally, we calculate wave speed, which matches with other rat and human measurements.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-31

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Fetal Growth Models of Cardiac Size and Function, and Prediction of Congenital Cardiomyopathy in Fetuses with Diabetic Mothers

Description

2D fetal echocardiography (ECHO) can be used for monitoring heart development in utero. This study’s purpose is to empirically model normal fetal heart growth and function changes during development by

2D fetal echocardiography (ECHO) can be used for monitoring heart development in utero. This study’s purpose is to empirically model normal fetal heart growth and function changes during development by ECHO and compare these to fetuses diagnosed with and without cardiomyopathy with diabetic mothers. There are existing mathematical models describing fetal heart development but they warrant revalidation and adjustment. 377 normal fetuses with healthy mothers, 98 normal fetuses with diabetic mothers, and 37 fetuses with cardiomyopathy and diabetic mothers had their cardiac structural dimensions, cardiothoracic ratio, valve flow velocities, and heart rates measured by fetal ECHO in a retrospective chart review. Cardiac features were fitted to linear functions, with respect to gestational age, femur length, head circumference, and biparietal diameter and z-scores were created to model normal fetal growth for all parameters. These z-scores were used to assess what metrics had no difference in means between the normal fetuses of both healthy and diabetic mothers but differed from those diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. It was found that functional metrics like mitral and tricuspid E wave and pulmonary velocity could be important predictors for cardiomyopathy when fitted by gestational age, femur length, head circumference, and biparietal diameter. Additionally, aortic and tricuspid annulus diameters when fitted to estimated gestational age showed potential to be predictors for fetal cardiomyopathy. While the metrics overlapped over their full range, combining them together may have the potential for predicting cardiomyopathy in utero. Future directions of this study will explore creating a classifier model that can predict cardiomyopathy using the metrics assessed in this study.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Fetal Growth Models of Cardiac Size and Function, and Prediction of Congenital Cardiomyopathy in Fetuses with Diabetic Mothers

Description

2D fetal echocardiography (ECHO) can be used for monitoring heart development in utero. This study’s purpose is to empirically model normal fetal heart growth and function changes during development by

2D fetal echocardiography (ECHO) can be used for monitoring heart development in utero. This study’s purpose is to empirically model normal fetal heart growth and function changes during development by ECHO and compare these to fetuses diagnosed with and without cardiomyopathy with diabetic mothers. There are existing mathematical models describing fetal heart development but they warrant revalidation and adjustment. 377 normal fetuses with healthy mothers, 98 normal fetuses with diabetic mothers, and 37 fetuses with cardiomyopathy and diabetic mothers had their cardiac structural dimensions, cardiothoracic ratio, valve flow velocities, and heart rates measured by fetal ECHO in a retrospective chart review. Cardiac features were fitted to linear functions, with respect to gestational age, femur length, head circumference, and biparietal diameter and z-scores were created to model normal fetal growth for all parameters. These z-scores were used to assess what metrics had no difference in means between the normal fetuses of both healthy and diabetic mothers, but differed from those diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. It was found that functional metrics like mitral and tricuspid E wave and pulmonary velocity could be important predictors for cardiomyopathy when fitted by gestational age, femur length, head circumference, and biparietal diameter. Additionally, aortic and tricuspid annulus diameters when fitted to estimated gestational age showed potential to be predictors for fetal cardiomyopathy. While the metrics overlapped over their full range, combining them together may have the potential for predicting cardiomyopathy in utero. Future directions of this study will explore creating a classifier model that can predict cardiomyopathy using the metrics assessed in this study.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Development of A Novel Virtual Tool for Donor Heart Fitting

Description

Heart transplantation is the final treatment option for end-stage heart failure. In the United States, 70 pediatric patients die annually on the waitlist while 800 well-functioning organs get discarded. Concern

Heart transplantation is the final treatment option for end-stage heart failure. In the United States, 70 pediatric patients die annually on the waitlist while 800 well-functioning organs get discarded. Concern for potential size-mismatch is one source of allograft waste and high waitlist mortality. Clinicians use the donor-recipient body weight (DRBW) ratio, a standalone metric, to evaluate allograft size-match. However, this body weight metric is far removed from cardiac anatomy and neglects an individual’s anatomical variations. This thesis body of work developed a novel virtual heart transplant fit assessment tool and investigated the tool’s clinical utility to help clinicians safely expand patient donor pools.

The tool allowed surgeons to take an allograft reconstruction and fuse it to a patient’s CT or MR medical image for virtual fit assessment. The allograft is either a reconstruction of the donor’s actual heart (from CT or MR images) or an analogue from a health heart library. The analogue allograft geometry is identified from gross donor parameters using a regression model build herein. The need for the regression model is donor images may not exist or they may not become available within the time-window clinicians have to make a provisional acceptance of an offer.

The tool’s assessment suggested > 20% of upper DRBW listings could have been increased at Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH). Upper DRBW listings in the UNOS national database was statistically smaller than at PCH (p-values: < 0.001). Delayed sternal closure and surgeon perceived complication variables had an association (p-value: 0.000016) with 9 of the 11 cases that surgeons had perceived fit-related complications had delayed closures (p-value: 0.034809).

A tool to assess allograft size-match has been developed. Findings warrant future preclinical and clinical prospective studies to further assess the tool’s clinical utility.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018