Matching Items (23)

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Simultaneous Two-Color Lasing in a Single CdSSe Heterostructure Nanosheet

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The ability of a single monolithic semiconductor structure to emit or lase in a broad spectrum range is of great importance for many applications such as solid-state lighting and multi-spectrum detection. But spectral range of a laser or light-emitting diode

The ability of a single monolithic semiconductor structure to emit or lase in a broad spectrum range is of great importance for many applications such as solid-state lighting and multi-spectrum detection. But spectral range of a laser or light-emitting diode made of a given semiconductor is typically limited by its emission or gain bandwidth. Due to lattice mismatch, it is typically difficult to grow thin film or bulk materials with very different bandgaps in a monolithic fashion. But nanomaterials such as nanowires, nanobelts, nanosheets provide a unique opportunity. Here we report our experimental results demonstrating simultaneous lasing in two visible colors at 526 and 623 nm from a single CdSSe heterostructure nanosheet at room temperature. The 97 nm wavelength separation of the two colors is significantly larger than the gain bandwidth of a typical single II-VI semiconductor material. Such lasing and light emission in a wide spectrum range from a single monolithic structure will have important applications mentioned above.

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2013-10-28

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Optical characterization and lasing study of nanowires

Description

Nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) structures with diameter on the nanometer scales with a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio. Nanowires of various materials including semiconductors, dielectrics and metals have been intensively researched in the past two decades for applications to electrical and

Nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) structures with diameter on the nanometer scales with a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio. Nanowires of various materials including semiconductors, dielectrics and metals have been intensively researched in the past two decades for applications to electrical and optical devices. Typically, nanowires are synthesized using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) approach, which allows defect-free 1D growth despite the lattice mismatch between nanowires and substrates. Lattice mismatch issue is a serious problem in high-quality thin film growth of many semiconductors and non-semiconductors. Therefore, nanowires provide promising platforms for the applications requiring high crystal quality materials.

With the 1D geometry, nanowires are natural optical waveguides for light guiding and propagation. By introducing feedback mechanisms to nanowire waveguides, such as the cleaved end facets, the nanowires can work as ultra-small size lasers. Since the first demonstration of the room-temperature ultraviolet nanowire lasers in 2001, the nanowire lasers covering from ultraviolet to mid infrared wavelength ranges have been intensively studied. This dissertation focuses on the optical characterization and laser fabrication of two nanowire materials: erbium chloride silicate nanowires and composition-graded CdSSe semiconductor alloy nanowires.

Chapter 1 – 5 of this dissertation presents a comprehensive characterization of a newly developed erbium compound material, erbium chloride silicate (ECS) in a nanowire form. Extensive experiments demonstrated the high crystal quality and excellent optical properties of ECS nanowires. Optical gain higher than 30 dB/cm at 1.53 μm wavelength is demonstrated on single ECS nanowires, which is higher than the gain of any reported erbium materials. An ultra-high Q photonic crystal micro-cavity is designed on a single ECS nanowire towards the ultra-compact lasers at communication wavelengths. Such ECS nanowire lasers show the potential applications of on-chip photonics integration.

Chapter 6 – 7 presents the design and demonstration of dynamical color-controllable lasers on a single CdSSe alloy nanowire. Through the defect-free VLS growth, engineering of the alloy composition in a single nanowire is achieved. The alloy composition of CdSxSe1-x uniformly varies along the nanowire axis from x=1 to x=0, giving the opportunity of multi-color lasing in a monolithic structure. By looping the wide-bandgap end of the alloy nanowire through nanoscale manipulation, the simultaneous two-color lasing at green and red colors are demonstrated. The 107 nm wavelength separation of the two lasing colors is much larger than the gain bandwidth of typical semiconductors. Since the two-color lasing shares the output port, the color of the total lasing output can be controlled dynamically between the two fundamental colors by changing the relative output power of two lasing colors. Such multi-color lasing and continuous color tuning in a wide spectral range would eventually enable color-by-design lasers to be used for lighting, display and many other applications.

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Date Created
2015

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Synthesis and characterization of erbium compound nanowires as high gain optical materials

Description

Integrated photonics requires high gain optical materials in the telecom wavelength range for optical amplifiers and coherent light sources. Erbium (Er) containing materials are ideal candidates due to the 1.5 μm emission from Er3+ ions. However, the Er density in

Integrated photonics requires high gain optical materials in the telecom wavelength range for optical amplifiers and coherent light sources. Erbium (Er) containing materials are ideal candidates due to the 1.5 μm emission from Er3+ ions. However, the Er density in typical Er-doped materials is less than 1 x 1020 cm-3, thus limiting the maximum optical gain to a few dB/cm, too small to be useful for integrated photonics applications. Er compounds could potentially solve this problem since they contain much higher Er density. So far the existing Er compounds suffer from short lifetime and strong upconversion effects, mainly due to poor quality of crystals produced by various methods of thin film growth and deposition. This dissertation explores a new Er compound: erbium chloride silicate (ECS, Er3(SiO4)2Cl ) in the nanowire form, which facilitates the growth of high quality single crystals. Growth methods for such single crystal ECS nanowires have been established. Various structural and optical characterizations have been carried out. The high crystal quality of ECS material leads to a long lifetime of the first excited state of Er3+ ions up to 1 ms at Er density higher than 1022 cm-3. This Er lifetime-density product was found to be the largest among all Er containing materials. A unique integrating sphere method was developed to measure the absorption cross section of ECS nanowires from 440 to 1580 nm. Pump-probe experiments demonstrated a 644 dB/cm signal enhancement from a single ECS wire. It was estimated that such large signal enhancement can overcome the absorption to result in a net material gain, but not sufficient to compensate waveguide propagation loss. In order to suppress the upconversion process in ECS, Ytterbium (Yb) and Yttrium (Y) ions are introduced as substituent ions of Er in the ECS crystal structure to reduce Er density. While the addition of Yb ions only partially succeeded, erbium yttrium chloride silicate (EYCS) with controllable Er density was synthesized successfully. EYCS with 30 at. % Er was found to be the best. It shows the strongest PL emission at 1.5 μm, and thus can be potentially used as a high gain material.

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Date Created
2013

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Optical and crystal structure characterizations of nanowires for infrared applications

Description

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are one dimensional materials and have size quantization effect when the diameter is sufficiently small. They can serve as optical wave guides along the length direction and contain optically active gain at the same time. Due to

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are one dimensional materials and have size quantization effect when the diameter is sufficiently small. They can serve as optical wave guides along the length direction and contain optically active gain at the same time. Due to these unique properties, NWs are now very promising and extensively studied for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. A systematic and comprehensive optical and microstructural study of several important infrared semiconductor NWs is presented in this thesis, which includes InAs, PbS, InGaAs, erbium chloride silicate and erbium silicate. Micro-photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized in conjunction to characterize the optical and microstructure of these wires. The focus of this thesis is on optical study of semiconductor NWs in the mid-infrared wavelengths. First, differently structured InAs NWs grown using various methods were characterized and compared. Three main PL peaks which are below, near and above InAs bandgap, respectively, were observed. The octadecylthiol self-assembled monolayer was employed to passivate the surface of InAs NWs to eliminate or reduce the effects of the surface states. The band-edge emission from wurtzite-structured NWs was completely recovered after passivatoin. The passivated NWs showed very good stability in air and under heat. In the second part, mid-infrared optical study was conducted on PbS wires of subwavelength diameter and lasing was demonstrated under optical pumping. The PbS wires were grown on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition and have a rock-salt cubic structure. Single-mode lasing at the wavelength of ~3000-4000 nm was obtained from single as-grown PbS wire up to the temperature of 115 K. PL characterization was also utilized to demonstrate the highest crystallinity of the vertical arrays of InP and InGaAs/InP composition-graded heterostructure NWs made by a top-down fabrication method. TEM-related measurements were performed to study the crystal structures and elemental compositions of the Er-compound core-shell NWs. The core-shell NWs consist of an orthorhombic-structured erbium chloride silicate shell and a cubic-structured silicon core. These NWs provide unique Si-compatible materials with emission at 1530 nm for optical communications and solid state lasers.

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Date Created
2011

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Dual-wavelength internal-optically-pumped semiconductor laser diodes

Description

Dual-wavelength laser sources have various existing and potential applications in wavelength division multiplexing, differential techniques in spectroscopy for chemical sensing, multiple-wavelength interferometry, terahertz-wave generation, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In the drive for ever smaller and increasingly mobile electronic

Dual-wavelength laser sources have various existing and potential applications in wavelength division multiplexing, differential techniques in spectroscopy for chemical sensing, multiple-wavelength interferometry, terahertz-wave generation, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In the drive for ever smaller and increasingly mobile electronic devices, dual-wavelength coherent light output from a single semiconductor laser diode would enable further advances and deployment of these technologies. The output of conventional laser diodes is however limited to a single wavelength band with a few subsequent lasing modes depending on the device design. This thesis investigates a novel semiconductor laser device design with a single cavity waveguide capable of dual-wavelength laser output with large spectral separation. The novel dual-wavelength semiconductor laser diode uses two shorter- and longer-wavelength active regions that have separate electron and hole quasi-Fermi energy levels and carrier distributions. The shorter-wavelength active region is based on electrical injection as in conventional laser diodes, and the longer-wavelength active region is then pumped optically by the internal optical field of the shorter-wavelength laser mode, resulting in stable dual-wavelength laser emission at two different wavelengths quite far apart. Different designs of the device are studied using a theoretical model developed in this work to describe the internal optical pumping scheme. The carrier transport and separation of the quasi-Fermi distributions are then modeled using a software package that solves Poisson's equation and the continuity equations to simulate semiconductor devices. Three different designs are grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and broad-area-contact laser diodes are processed using conventional methods. The modeling and experimental results of the first generation design indicate that the optical confinement factor of the longer-wavelength active region is a critical element in realizing dual-wavelength laser output. The modeling predicts lower laser thresholds for the second and third generation designs; however, the experimental results of the second and third generation devices confirm challenges related to the epitaxial growth of the structures in eventually demonstrating dual-wavelength laser output.

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Date Created
2011

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New measurement techniques and their applications in single molecule electronics

Description

Studying charge transport through single molecules tethered between two metal electrodes is of fundamental importance in molecular electronics. Over the years, a variety of methods have been developed in attempts of performing such measurements. However, the limitation of these techniques

Studying charge transport through single molecules tethered between two metal electrodes is of fundamental importance in molecular electronics. Over the years, a variety of methods have been developed in attempts of performing such measurements. However, the limitation of these techniques is still one of the factors that prohibit one from gaining a thorough understanding of single molecule junctions. Firstly, the time resolution of experiments is typically limited to milli to microseconds, while molecular dynamics simulations are carried out on the time scale of pico to nanoseconds. A huge gap therefore persists between the theory and the experiments. This thesis demonstrates a nanosecond scale measurement of the gold atomic contact breakdown process. A combined setup of DC and AC circuits is employed, where the AC circuit reveals interesting observations in nanosecond scale not previously seen using conventional DC circuits. The breakdown time of gold atomic contacts is determined to be faster than 0.1 ns and subtle atomic events are observed within nanoseconds. Furthermore, a new method based on the scanning tunneling microscope break junction (STM-BJ) technique is developed to rapidly record thousands of I-V curves from repeatedly formed single molecule junctions. 2-dimensional I-V and conductance-voltage (G-V) histograms constructed using the acquired data allow for more meaningful statistical analysis to single molecule I-V characteristics. The bias voltage adds an additional dimension to the conventional single molecule conductance measurement. This method also allows one to perform transition voltage spectra (TVS) for individual junctions and to study the correlation between the conductance and the tunneling barrier height. The variation of measured conductance values is found to be primarily determined by the poorly defined contact geometry between the molecule and metal electrodes, rather than the tunnel barrier height. In addition, the rapid I-V technique is also found useful in studying thermoelectric effect in single molecule junctions. When applying a temperature gradient between the STM tip and substrate in air, the offset current at zero bias in the I-V characteristics is a measure of thermoelectric current. The rapid I-V technique allows for statistical analysis of such offset current at different temperature gradients and thus the Seebeck coefficient of single molecule junctions is measured. Combining with single molecule TVS, the Seebeck coefficient is also found to be a measure of tunnel barrier height.

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Date Created
2012

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Quantum efficiency measurement of nanowires using integrating sphere

Description

This thesis mainly focuses on the study of quantum efficiency (QE) and its measurement, especially for nanowires (NWs). First, a brief introduction of nano-technology and nanowire is given to describe my initial research interest. Next various fundamental kinds of recombination

This thesis mainly focuses on the study of quantum efficiency (QE) and its measurement, especially for nanowires (NWs). First, a brief introduction of nano-technology and nanowire is given to describe my initial research interest. Next various fundamental kinds of recombination mechanisms are described; both for radiative and non-radiative processes. This is an introduction for defining the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). A relative IQE measurement method is shown following that. Then it comes to the major part of the thesis discussing a procedure of quantum efficiency measurement using photoluminescence (PL) method and an integrating sphere, which has not been much applied to nanowires (NWs). In fact this is a convenient and useful approach for evaluating the quality of NWs since it considers not only the PL emission but also the absorption of NWs. The process is well illustrated and performed with both wavelength-dependent and power-dependent measurements. The measured PLQE is in the range of 0.3% ~ 5.4%. During the measurement, a phenomenon called photodegradation is observed and examined by a set of power-dependence measurements. This effect can be a factor for underestimating the PLQE and a procedure is introduced during the sample preparation process which managed to reduce this effect for some degree.

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Date Created
2012

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Nanowire synthesis and characterization: erbium chloride silicate and two segment CdS-CdSe nanowires and belts

Description

In this work, I worked on the synthesis and characterization of nanowires and belts, grown using different materials, in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system with catalytic growth method. Through this thesis, I utilized the Photoluminescence (PL), Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM),

In this work, I worked on the synthesis and characterization of nanowires and belts, grown using different materials, in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system with catalytic growth method. Through this thesis, I utilized the Photoluminescence (PL), Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses to find out the properties of Erbium Chloride Silicate (ECS) and two segment CdS-CdSe samples. In the first part of my research, growth of very new material, Erbium Chloride Silicate (ECS), in form of core/shell Si/ECS and pure ECS nanowires, was demonstrated. This new material has very fascinating properties for new Si based photonic devices. The Erbium density in those nanowires is which is very high value compared to the other Erbium doped materials. It was shown that the luminescence peaks of ECS nanowires are very sharp and stronger than their counterparts. Furthermore, both PL and XRD peaks get sharper and stronger as growth temperature increases and this shows that crystalline quality of ECS nanowires gets better with higher temperature. In the second part, I did a very detail research for growing two segment axial nanowires or radial belts and report that the structure type mostly depends on the growth temperature. Since our final step is to create white light LEDs using single axial nanowires which have three different regions grown with distinct materials and give red, green and blue colors simultaneously, we worked on growing CdS-CdSe nanowires or belts for the first step of our aim. Those products were successfully grown and they gave two luminescence peaks with maximum 160 nm wavelength separation depending on the growth conditions. It was observed that products become more likely belt once the substrate temperature increases. Also, dominance between VLS and VS is very critical to determine the shape of the products and the substitution of CdS by CdSe is very effective; hence, CdSe growth time should be chosen accordingly. However, it was shown two segmented products can be synthesized by picking the right conditions and with very careful analyses. We also demonstrated that simultaneous two colors lasing from a single segmented belt structures is possible with strong enough-pumping-power.

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Date Created
2012

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Design, modeling and simulation of nanoscale optoelectronic devices: semiconductor nano-lasers and plasmonic waveguides

Description

This thesis summarizes the research work carried out on design, modeling and simulation of semiconductor nanophotonic devices. The research includes design of nanowire (NW) lasers, modeling of active plasmonic waveguides, design of plasmonic nano-lasers, and design of all-semiconductor plasmonic systems.

This thesis summarizes the research work carried out on design, modeling and simulation of semiconductor nanophotonic devices. The research includes design of nanowire (NW) lasers, modeling of active plasmonic waveguides, design of plasmonic nano-lasers, and design of all-semiconductor plasmonic systems. For the NW part, a comparative study of electrical injection in the longitudinal p-i-n and coaxial p-n core-shell NWs was performed. It is found that high density carriers can be efficiently injected into and confined in the core-shell structure. The required bias voltage and doping concentrations in the core-shell structure are smaller than those in the longitudinal p-i-n structure. A new device structure with core-shell configuration at the p and n contact regions for electrically driven single NW laser was proposed. Through a comprehensive design trade-off between threshold gain and threshold voltage, room temperature lasing has been proved in the laser with low threshold current and large output efficiency. For the plasmonic part, the propagation of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) in a metal-semiconductor-metal structure where semiconductor is highly excited to have an optical gain was investigated. It is shown that near the resonance the SPP mode experiences an unexpected giant modal gain that is 1000 times of the material gain in the semiconductor and the corresponding confinement factor is as high as 105. The physical origin of the giant modal gain is the slowing down of the average energy propagation in the structure. Secondly, SPP modes lasing in a metal-insulator-semiconductor multi-layer structure was investigated. It is shown that the lasing threshold can be reduced by structural optimization. A specific design example was optimized using AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well sandwiched between silver layers. This cavity has a physical volume of 1.5×10-4 λ03 which is the smallest nanolaser reported so far. Finally, the all-semiconductor based plasmonics was studied. It is found that InAs is superior to other common semiconductors for plasmonic application in mid-infrared range. A plasmonic system made of InAs, GaSb and AlSb layers, consisting of a plasmonic source, waveguide and detector was proposed. This on-chip integrated system is realizable in a single epitaxial growth process.

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Date Created
2012