Matching Items (32)

Know Go: Developing a Pilot Training Application

Description

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every day, checklists are used from the moment you step into

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every day, checklists are used from the moment you step into the cockpit until the last light that is turned off at the end of the flight. Checklists are such a significant part of aviation, and several different ways to run a checklist have been created (such as the challenge-response and do-and-tell methods). Despite these variations in checklist usage and procedures, all methods are restricted in terms of user involvement; in other words, pilots are not easily engaged or invested in the checklists that they use in day to day operations. Theorized through exposure to this issue as a student and as a Certified Flight Instructor, Know Go™ has been created as a long term tool to replace conventional checklists with a resourceful one that acts as both a normal checklist for daily use and a learning tool for long term retention. The purpose of this text is to introduce the capabilities of the application, as well as discuss the theories behind the effectiveness of the application. The developmental processes and the challenges associated with application production will also be analyzed.

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2019-05

Guiding Aviation Students on How to Effectively Search for Internships

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This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation students for the purpose of guiding them in how to

This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation students for the purpose of guiding them in how to effectively search for internships. My internship experiences led to a full-time job offer and this project aims to help provide other aviation students with the same opportunities.

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2018-05

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Wildlife Strikes at Airports: What are the Contributing Factors?

Description

In the U.S., less than 20 percent of wildlife strikes are reported, which leaves a large portion of incidents unaccounted for. Although wildlife strikes at airports often go unreported, since the early 1990's the number of wildlife strikes has increased

In the U.S., less than 20 percent of wildlife strikes are reported, which leaves a large portion of incidents unaccounted for. Although wildlife strikes at airports often go unreported, since the early 1990's the number of wildlife strikes has increased five-fold and the number of damaging strikes has increased 1.5-fold. Goals for this project include determining if biological and landscape variables are good predictors of wildlife strikes. We define response variables as the number of reported wildlife strikes per 10,000 airport operations. We studied seven major airports around Phoenix, Arizona and 30 large airports in the western U.S. In the Phoenix metro valley, airports varied from having 0.3 strikes per year per 10,000 operations to having 14.5 strikes from 2009 to 2013. We determined bird richness by using the citizen-science database "eBird,"and measured species richness within a 15 kilometer area of each airport. Species richness between hotspots ranged from 131 to 320. Seasonal differences were determined using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis for the seven Phoenix metro airports as well as the 30 western U.S. airports. Our results showed that there was a seasonal difference in wildlife strikes in the majority of our airports. We also used land use data from CAP LTER to determine any environmental factors such as vicinity to water or fence line located within five kilometers from airports using ArcGIS. These results are important because they are helpful in determining the factors influencing wildlife strikes based on the number of strikes reported.

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2015-05

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ANALYSIS OF THE OWNERSHIP AND OPERATION OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWERS

Description

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government currently faces a problem of a tight financial budget and

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government currently faces a problem of a tight financial budget and sequestration, which often times means mandatory budget cuts. This project provides one possible solution for the FAA to save money in their budget without adversely affecting safety. The FAA could establish appropriate criteria to compare all ATCTs. The FAA could then apply these criteria in a policy that would contract the operation of certain low-level ATCTs and conversely handle the operations at high-activity ATCTs. Additionally, the FAA could include a policy to transfer the ownership of certain low-activity towers, but transfer the ownership of high-activity towers to the FAA. The research was completed by studying various documents from the FAA, Department of Transportation (DOT), and industry groups. Most of the data analysis was conducted by creating tables, queries, and graphs from FAA data. The FAA data was found on their Air Traffic Activity Data System (ATADS). From my data analysis, I was able to identify sixty-nine ATCTs that are currently operated by the FAA that could become federal contract towers (FCT) and forty-six FCTs that could be operated by the FAA. Each FCT saves the FAA approximately $1.488 million, so the FAA could save $34.2 million per year by implementing my solutions. I have also established sample criteria for determining which ATCTs could be maintained by the FAA.

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Date Created
2013-12

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The Airline Industry: How the Pandemic Has and Continues to Reshape the Industry as We Know It

Description

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few days. The events that occurred on that specific day enacted

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few days. The events that occurred on that specific day enacted changes that affect the industry to this day. This paper analyzes some of the changes that were made and discusses some of the changes the industry is going through again, about 20 years after the events on September 11th. The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we all live our daily lives and aviation is not exempt. Changes to aircraft cleaning procedures, boarding processes, and seat design have all been ways the industry has gone through changes. The results of a potential recovery as well as the long-term changes are discussed.

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2021-05

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Passenger volumes post-accession to the European Union: signs of Southwest Airlines' model in Central and Eastern Europe

Description

In 2004 the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the European Union (EU) as part of the EU's greatest enlargement to date. These countries were followed by Bulgaria and Romania in 2007. One benefit of

In 2004 the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the European Union (EU) as part of the EU's greatest enlargement to date. These countries were followed by Bulgaria and Romania in 2007. One benefit of joining the EU was the freedom for residents in the new EU member states to migrate to western European nations, notably the United Kingdom (UK). A result of this new freedom was an increased need for air travel. The intersection of the expansion of the EU with the introduction of low-cost airline service was the topic addressed in this study. Yearly traffic statistics obtained from the UK Civil Aviation Authority were used to formulate a trend line of passenger volume growth from 1990 to 2003. Through a time series regression analysis, a confidence interval was calculated that established that, beginning with the year 2004, passenger volumes exceeded the probable margin of error, despite flat population growth. Low-cost carriers responded to these market conditions through the introduction of new flights across the region. These carriers modeled themselves after Southwest Airlines, a strategy that appeared to be more effective at meeting the needs of the post-accession travel boom. The result was a dramatic rise in both passenger volumes and low-cost airline routes in an east-west direction across the continent.

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Date Created
2012

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Design of Tool to Predict Flight Envelope Properties

Description

This thesis outlines the creation of an excel tool designed to utilize public flight data for a given flight and determine further information such as general flight properties, weight estimation, and aerodynamic and stability characteristics. In depth analyses is done

This thesis outlines the creation of an excel tool designed to utilize public flight data for a given flight and determine further information such as general flight properties, weight estimation, and aerodynamic and stability characteristics. In depth analyses is done for a TV Relay flight of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 to display the data processing and accuracy of the values. From this analyses it is displayed that the aircraft is flown safely and well within its performance parameters for the entire mission. The usefulness of this tool comes from its ability to successfully analyze critical properties and perform pilot and crash reconstruction analysis.

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2020-05

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Generational differences in safety attitudes among commercial airline pilots

Description

The objective of this study was to investigate the generational differences among US commercial airline pilots regarding their attitudes toward safety. A survey was distributed to three different US airlines: one major commercial airline, one regional airline, and one charter

The objective of this study was to investigate the generational differences among US commercial airline pilots regarding their attitudes toward safety. A survey was distributed to three different US airlines: one major commercial airline, one regional airline, and one charter airline. A total of 106 pilots participated in this study. The pilots were categorized into three groups of generations based on birth years: Baby Boomers: 1946-1964, Generation X: 1965-1980, and Generation Y: 1981-2000. Through the use of one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), the results of the analyses found that there was no significant difference between the generations of pilots regarding safety attitudes. In the subcategory of self-confidence, the results indicated no significant differences between the different generations of pilots. However, in the subcategories of risk orientation and safety orientation, significant differences were detected among the three generations of pilots. Baby Boomers were found to have the lowest risk tolerance, while Generation Y had the highest. Conversely, Baby Boomers were found to have the highest safety orientation, with the lowest being that of Generation Y.

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Date Created
2013

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Analyzing technical teamwork communication issues in aircraft maintenance shift turnover

Description

The three most common errors related to communication during shift turnovers are during inspection, installation, and the minimum equipment list (MEL). Miscommunications during shift turnover could lead to a catastrophic disaster. Numerous accidents have occurred relating to shift turnover issues;

The three most common errors related to communication during shift turnovers are during inspection, installation, and the minimum equipment list (MEL). Miscommunications during shift turnover could lead to a catastrophic disaster. Numerous accidents have occurred relating to shift turnover issues; therefore, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been studying this matter in order to avoid preventable miscommunication problems. It has also been suggested that communication skills be developed at 14 CFR Part 147 schools so that students can communicate effectively with others in their future field. In order to assess the communication issues of students at these schools, three investigative treatments were utilized to assess communication during shift turnover. The first treatment consisted of verbal communication only; the second treatment consisted of the use of a whiteboard and written report; and the third treatment consisted of the use of a template of a fire protection system diagram on a whiteboard along with a written report. This study involved 14 students from a community college in the southwest. Data collected focused on the confidence level of communicated information related to the assigned tasks within a given time period. Through the use of Analysis of Variance, the results of the analyses found that there was no significant difference between each treatment. The data sets for the team leaders and team members were separately analyzed while there appears to be an increase of ease of communication by the use of the whiteboard- indicating a need for further study- no significant differences were found between the three treatments. Discussion of possible causes as well as the need for future investigations is presented.

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Date Created
2011

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NetGENgagement: how the net generation college student uses social media in academic and social college experiences

Description

The landscape of higher education is constantly evolving. Similar to a wave that washes ashore and transforms the shoreline, the same is occurring with higher education and its "shoreline". With the influx of technology and social media on college and

The landscape of higher education is constantly evolving. Similar to a wave that washes ashore and transforms the shoreline, the same is occurring with higher education and its "shoreline". With the influx of technology and social media on college and university campuses, higher education institutions have had to grapple with whether or not to implement the technology (e.g. mobile devices) and the social mediums (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) that accompany these technologies into the academic and social college experiences of the tech-savvy students enrolling in higher education institutions. Higher education's new shoreline is largely being produced by the new paradigms of technology and social media adopted by the Net Generation college student. The forces of the evolving nature of technology are having an enormous impact on higher education practitioners. The prolific transcendence of Smartphones, tablets, and social mediums and the expansion of broadband (e.g. Wi-Fi) are changing student expectations of how higher education practitioners engage, communicate, and connect with the Net Generation college student. The assumption that many higher education practitioners have of social media is that social media primarily consists of Facebook and Twitter. Arguably Facebook and Twitter comprise the primary social avenues students traverse when communicating with friends and family but additionally, these sites can also be utilized for academic and social purposes advantageous to colleges and universities in enhancing the college student experience. The purpose of this study is to understand and describe how the Net Generation college student uses social media in their academic and social college experiences. Through the use of a descriptive analysis, this action research study described how the Net Generation college student uses social media in their academic and social college student experiences.

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2012