Matching Items (9)

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Analyses of receptive and productive Korean EFL vocabulary: computer-based vocabulary learning program

Description

The present research study investigated the effects of 8 versions of a computer-based vocabulary learning program on receptive and productive knowledge levels of college students. The participants were 106 male

The present research study investigated the effects of 8 versions of a computer-based vocabulary learning program on receptive and productive knowledge levels of college students. The participants were 106 male and 103 female Korean EFL students from Kyungsung University and Kwandong University in Korea. Students who participated in versions of the vocabulary learning program with target-word based sentences as well as definitions tended to perform better on receptive and productive vocabulary assessments than those who participated in versions of the program with definitions of words only. Furthermore, results indicated that the difference in receptive scores from immediately after the program to one week later showed a higher drop-rate than the difference in productive scores. In addition, female learners performed receptively better than male learners in post and one-week delayed tests, but significant gender difference failed to occur for the productivity measure. Overall, these results emphasized the importance of productive vocabulary knowledge for better retention of English vocabulary words.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Exploring the use of augmented reality to support cognitive modeling in art education

Description

The present study explored the use of augmented reality (AR) technology to support cognitive modeling in an art-based learning environment. The AR application used in this study made visible the

The present study explored the use of augmented reality (AR) technology to support cognitive modeling in an art-based learning environment. The AR application used in this study made visible the thought processes and observational techniques of art experts for the learning benefit of novices through digital annotations, overlays, and side-by-side comparisons that when viewed on mobile device appear directly on works of art.

Using a 2 x 3 factorial design, this study compared learner outcomes and motivation across technologies (audio-only, video, AR) and groupings (individuals, dyads) with 182 undergraduate and graduate students who were self-identified art novices. Learner outcomes were measured by post-activity spoken responses to a painting reproduction with the pre-activity response as a moderating variable. Motivation was measured by the sum score of a reduced version of the Instructional Materials Motivational Survey (IMMS), accounting for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction, with total time spent in learning activity as the moderating variable. Information on participant demographics, technology usage, and art experience was also collected.

Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions that differed by technology and grouping before completing a learning activity where they viewed four high-resolution, printed-to-scale painting reproductions in a gallery-like setting while listening to audio-recorded conversations of two experts discussing the actual paintings. All participants listened to expert conversations but the video and AR conditions received visual supports via mobile device.

Though no main effects were found for technology or groupings, findings did include statistically significant higher learner outcomes in the elements of design subscale (characteristics most represented by the visual supports of the AR application) than the audio-only conditions. When participants saw digital representations of line, shape, and color directly on the paintings, they were more likely to identify those same features in the post-activity painting. Seeing what the experts see, in a situated environment, resulted in evidence that participants began to view paintings in a manner similar to the experts. This is evidence of the value of the temporal and spatial contiguity afforded by AR in cognitive modeling learning environments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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An Architecture for Designing Content Agnostic Game Mechanics for Educational Burst Games

Description

Currently, educational games are designed with the educational content as the primary factor driving the design of the game. While this may seem to be the optimal approach, this design

Currently, educational games are designed with the educational content as the primary factor driving the design of the game. While this may seem to be the optimal approach, this design paradigm causes multiple issues. For one, the games themselves are often not engaging as game design principles were put aside in favor of increasing the educational value of the game. The other issue is that the code base of the game is mostly or completely unusable for any other games as the game mechanics are too strongly connected to the educational content being taught. This means that the mechanics are impossible to reuse in future projects without major revisions, and starting over is often more time and cost efficient.

This thesis presents the Content Agnostic Game Engineering (CAGE) model for designing educational games. CAGE is a way to separate the educational content from the game mechanics without compromising the educational value of the game. This is done by designing mechanics that can have multiple educational contents layered on top of them which can be switched out at any time. CAGE allows games to be designed with a game design first approach which allows them to maintain higher engagement levels. In addition, since the mechanics are not tied to the educational content several different educational topics can reuse the same set of mechanics without requiring major revisions to the existing code.

Results show that CAGE greatly reduces the amount of code needed to make additional versions of educational games, and speeds up the development process. The CAGE model is also shown to not induce high levels of cognitive load, allowing for more in depth topic work than was attempted in this thesis. However, engagement was low and switching the active content does interrupt the game flow considerably. Altering the difficulty of the game in real time in response to the affective state of the player was not shown to increase engagement. Potential causes of the issues with CAGE games and potential fixes are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Exploring the Efficacy of Using Augmented Reality to Alleviate Common Misconceptions about Natural Selection

Description

Evidence suggests that Augmented Reality (AR) may be a powerful tool for

alleviating certain, lightly held scientific misconceptions. However, many

misconceptions surrounding the theory of evolution are deeply held

Evidence suggests that Augmented Reality (AR) may be a powerful tool for

alleviating certain, lightly held scientific misconceptions. However, many

misconceptions surrounding the theory of evolution are deeply held and resistant to

change. This study examines whether AR can serve as an effective tool for alleviating

these misconceptions by comparing the change in the number of misconceptions

expressed by users of a tablet-based version of a well-established classroom simulation to

the change in the number of misconceptions expressed by users of AR versions of the

simulation.

The use of realistic representations of objects is common for many AR

developers. However, this contradicts well-tested practices of multimedia design that

argue against the addition of unnecessary elements. This study also compared the use of

representational visualizations in AR, in this case, models of ladybug beetles, to symbolic

representations, in this case, colored circles.

To address both research questions, a one-factor, between-subjects experiment

was conducted with 189 participants randomly assigned to one of three conditions: non

AR, symbolic AR, and representational AR. Measures of change in the number and types

of misconceptions expressed, motivation, and time on task were examined using a pair of

planned orthogonal contrasts designed to test the study’s two research questions.

Participants in the AR-based condition showed a significantly smaller change in

the number of total misconceptions expressed after the treatment as well as in the number

of misconceptions related to intentionality; none of the other misconceptions examined

showed a significant difference. No significant differences were found in the total

number of misconceptions expressed between participants in the representative and

symbolic AR-based conditions, or on motivation. Contrary to the expectation that the

simulation would alleviate misconceptions, the average change in the number of

misconceptions expressed by participants increased. This is theorized to be due to the

juxtaposition of virtual and real-world entities resulting in a reduction in assumed

intentionality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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The effect of embedded questions in programming education videos

Description

One of the primary objective in a computer science related course is for students to be able to write programs implementing the concepts covered in that course. In educational psychology,

One of the primary objective in a computer science related course is for students to be able to write programs implementing the concepts covered in that course. In educational psychology, however, learning gains are more commonly measured using recall or problem solving questions. While these types of questions are relevant to computer science exams, they do not necessarily reflect a student’s ability to apply concepts by writing an original program to solve a novel problem.

This thesis investigates the effectiveness of including questions within instructional multimedia content to improve student performance on a related programming assignment. Similar techniques have proven effective in educational psychology research using other measures. The objective of this thesis is to apply educational techniques used in other domains to an experiment with real world measures of students in a computer science course. The findings of this paper demonstrate that the techniques used were promising in improving student performance on a programming assignment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Contextual computing: tracking healthcare providers in the Emergency Department via Bluetooth beacons

Description

Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) are frequently crowded. The Center for

Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) collects performance measurements from EDs

such as that of the door to clinician time. The

Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) are frequently crowded. The Center for

Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) collects performance measurements from EDs

such as that of the door to clinician time. The door to clinician time is the time at which a

patient is first seen by a clinician. Current methods for documenting the door to clinician

time are in written form and may contain inaccuracies. The goal of this thesis is to

provide a method for automatic and accurate retrieval and documentation of the door to

clinician time. To automatically collect door to clinician times, single board computers

were installed in patient rooms that logged the time whenever they saw a specific

Bluetooth emission from a device that the clinician carried. The Bluetooth signal is used

to calculate the distance of the clinician from the single board computer. The logged time

and distance calculation is then sent to the server where it is determined if the clinician

was in the room seeing the patient at the time logged. The times automatically collected

were compared with the handwritten times recorded by clinicians and have shown that

they are justifiably accurate to the minute.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Exploring the impact of varying levels of augmented reality to teach probability and sampling with a mobile device

Description

Statistics is taught at every level of education, yet teachers often have to assume their students have no knowledge of statistics and start from scratch each time they set out

Statistics is taught at every level of education, yet teachers often have to assume their students have no knowledge of statistics and start from scratch each time they set out to teach statistics. The motivation for this experimental study comes from interest in exploring educational applications of augmented reality (AR) delivered via mobile technology that could potentially provide rich, contextualized learning for understanding concepts related to statistics education. This study examined the effects of AR experiences for learning basic statistical concepts. Using a 3 x 2 research design, this study compared learning gains of 252 undergraduate and graduate students from a pre- and posttest given before and after interacting with one of three types of augmented reality experiences, a high AR experience (interacting with three dimensional images coupled with movement through a physical space), a low AR experience (interacting with three dimensional images without movement), or no AR experience (two dimensional images without movement). Two levels of collaboration (pairs and no pairs) were also included. Additionally, student perceptions toward collaboration opportunities and engagement were compared across the six treatment conditions. Other demographic information collected included the students' previous statistics experience, as well as their comfort level in using mobile devices. The moderating variables included prior knowledge (high, average, and low) as measured by the student's pretest score. Taking into account prior knowledge, students with low prior knowledge assigned to either high or low AR experience had statistically significant higher learning gains than those assigned to a no AR experience. On the other hand, the results showed no statistical significance between students assigned to work individually versus in pairs. Students assigned to both high and low AR experience perceived a statistically significant higher level of engagement than their no AR counterparts. Students with low prior knowledge benefited the most from the high AR condition in learning gains. Overall, the AR application did well for providing a hands-on experience working with statistical data. Further research on AR and its relationship to spatial cognition, situated learning, high order skill development, performance support, and other classroom applications for learning is still needed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

Exploring the use of tablet applications for emergency resuscitation practice

Description

As technology has advanced in recent years, tablet devices have started to make their way into all walks of life. Yet, many medical documentation processes still see the use of

As technology has advanced in recent years, tablet devices have started to make their way into all walks of life. Yet, many medical documentation processes still see the use of paper. Though the paper based documentation method has been shown to be effective for some purposes, the introduction of tablet devices has the potential to make the documentation processes a lot smoother. In this thesis, tablet based documentation systems are reviewed, and based on this, a new custom application is developed that medical staff can use with ease. This new application, developed for an iPad is one where users can fully customize their own forms for different uses in the intensive care unit for resuscitation scenarios. The thesis discusses the architecture behind this application along with designing different elements of the system. Through this thesis project, the application was evaluated to see if such a complex documentation process can be easily used and created on a tablet device. The medical staff surveyed, responded positively to the use of the application and agreed that the electronic documentation usage and creation is a powerful tool that could help improve resuscitation practice by making it more efficient.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Assessing Adaptive Learning Styles in Computer Science Through a Virtual World

Description

Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field

Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field entails. To make matters worse, students who are introduced to computer science are frequently being fed only part of what it is about rather than its entire construction. Consequently, they feel out of their depth when they approach college. Research has discovered that by teaching computer science and programming through a problem-driven approach and focusing on a combination of syntax and computational thinking, students can be prepared when entering higher levels of computer science education.

This thesis describes the design, development, and early user testing of a theory-based virtual world for computer science instruction called System Dot. System Dot was designed to visually manifest programming instructions into interactable objects, giving players a way to see coding as tangible entities rather than text on a white screen. In order for System Dot to convey the true nature of computer science, a custom predictive recursive descent parser was embedded in the program to validate any user-generated solutions to pre-defined logical platforming puzzles.

Steps were taken to adapt the virtual world to player behavior by creating a system to detect their learning style playing the game. Through a dynamic Bayesian network, System Dot aims to classify a player’s learning style based on the Felder-Sylverman Learning Style Model (FSLSM). Testers played through the first half of System Dot, which was enough to test out the Bayesian network and initial learning style classification. This classification was then compared to the assessment by Felder’s Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire (ILSQ). Lastly, this thesis will also discuss ways to use the results from the user testing to implement a personalized feedback system for the virtual world in the future and what has been learned through the learning style method.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017