Matching Items (43)

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White and Beautiful: An Examination of Skin Whitening Practices and the Construction of the Female Identity in China

Description

This thesis investigates the role of colorism and the practice of skin whitening for women in China. By analyzing the historical evolution of ideal skin beauty in China, this project

This thesis investigates the role of colorism and the practice of skin whitening for women in China. By analyzing the historical evolution of ideal skin beauty in China, this project found that the cultural fixation with women's skin tone was used as a sociopolitical tool to regulate women's agency. Furthermore, this thesis also examines current skin whitening advertisements to understand modern impacts of Westernization and consumerism on contemporary discourses of femininity and beauty. Finally, it concludes with a discussion on skin whitening's ability to empower but also subjugate women within the confines of patriarchal expectations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi

Description

“Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi” analyzes archival research, publications, and oral histories to ma

“Okage Sama De (I Am Who I Am Because of You): A Comparative Examination of Japanese & Okinawan Experiences in Hawaiʻi” analyzes archival research, publications, and oral histories to map the generational progression of Japanese and Okinawan Americans in Hawaiʻi toward the American dream. The American dream and its meaning are questioned, particularly with regards to first generation experiences and the cultural shedding required for acceptance into American society. “Okage Sama De” is a saying that refers to the generational succession and accumulated wealth of Japanese and Okinawan Americans in Hawaiʻi, which these groups attribute their privileged position in society to. Although the strong emphasis placed on the hardships their ancestors overcame and on values like hard work allow members of this group to justify their privilege, the true origin of this privilege lies in the upward mobility afforded to them after World War II.

This work also explores how Japanese and Okinawans have maintained aspects of their culture and recreated their own distinct histories, particularly in Hawaiʻi. It analyzes how the Japanese and Okinawan communities have worked to preserve aspects of culture in Hawaiʻi and how their efforts have been received. Emphasis is placed on the third and fourth generations and how they have recreated their histories, particularly since many of them are largely Americanized. Furthermore, a critical lens is placed on the relationship between Japanese and Okinawans, who are often lumped together by larger society, to extract a better understanding of their historical and cultural differences. There is also analysis on how Japanese discrimination against Okinawans manifested in Hawaiʻi and what effect this had on each generation.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Geographical Influences on Parental Decision for Child's Secondary Education from a Race Perspective

Description

The objective of this research project was to explore how lower-income, Latinx parents make decisions about where their child will attend high school and the factors that influence choosing out-of-district

The objective of this research project was to explore how lower-income, Latinx parents make decisions about where their child will attend high school and the factors that influence choosing out-of-district or in-district (public, charter or private) high schools. Research on parental choice of schooling often finds that parents’ education and income make a difference in school choice decisions with higher-income parents relying more on social networks for information and lower-income parents relying more on school-based information (e.g., Bosetti, 2004; Holme, 2002). Researchers have also found that how information is presented and understood also plays a part in school choice (IES, 2018).
However, less information is available on how Latinx parents receive information and the factors that play a part in their schooling decisions. This project focused on how Latinx parents weight information about their local high schools versus other school choices. The research revolving around Latinx families and high school choice matters because most research in the education sector does not involve minority groups, such as the Latinx and Hispanic communities specifically in Laveen. The key research questions are: Why do Latinx parents send their children to in-district high schools when those schools have poorer test scores? Why do parents send their children out of district high schools? What information and resources are used by parents to help make their decision in the process? How do student perspectives play a part in the decision?
Data was gathered through an on-line survey of parents about factors that play a part in the choice of high school. In-person case studies of four families also showed the detail of the specific ways that sources of information, personal networks, child input, and other factors influence the school choice process. I found that parents sent their children to their designated in-district high school because it was the closest available option that led to the most convenience in regards to commuting. On the other hand, I found that parents sent their child to an out of district high school because of the resources they used, which consisted of mostly family and other social networks that had attended or were currently attending that high school. Overall, the students’ perspective at the time when the decision was made played an important role in almost all of the case studies. All of the children were included at least somewhat and their input was taken into consideration if and when possible. Also, a geographical analysis of Laveen that includes the income levels, education levels, and high schools available in the area is interpreted. Through the maps completed by Social Explorer, the data used is from 2018, and it was filtered from the Hispanic population in Laveen from the non-Hispanic population to add more emphasis on a specific ethnicity.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Korean Cowboy: An Autoethnographic Memoir of Self-Reflection

Description

This memoir is organized into three parts, each based on a geographic location where I have lived that has contributed to my self-growth the most. The first part, South Korea,

This memoir is organized into three parts, each based on a geographic location where I have lived that has contributed to my self-growth the most. The first part, South Korea, analyzes the history of South Korea, as well as its relationship of international adoptions with the United States through my personal adoption story. The second part is focused on the sixteen years I spent growing up in Utah. From my early years in school, sports, part-time jobs, graduating from high school and my life as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, this section will showcase the difficulties of growing up in a town where I never fit in. The third and final part deals with the past three years of living in Arizona and attending college.
Even though writing this memoir is incredibly personal to myself, that does not discourage others from gaining something from reading this. I am not the first Asian American, ex-Mormon, college student or adopted individual who writes about their life and I most certainly will not be the last. If anyone is somewhat interested in any of the topics I am going to be writing about, then they can read this memoir and learn something. If not, then they can at least enjoy the stories and hopefully something I went through will put a smile on their face.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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A Wok to Remember: a Culinary Exploration of Asian American Cuisine

Description

Asian Americans have a unique relationship with food. From the moment they landed on American soil, their history and experiences have been tied to food, and not entirely by their

Asian Americans have a unique relationship with food. From the moment they landed on American soil, their history and experiences have been tied to food, and not entirely by their own will. Now, the general American population enjoys foods from a multitude of ethnic groups, but in America’s early history, these foods were abhorred and used as justifications for legal discrimination, murders, massacres, and banishment. These struggles forced Asian Americans to work in the food industry (the only work they could do without as much backlash), further promoting the association of Asian Americans and food. While working in the food industry in order to find passage into America and to survive, many Asian dishes had to be assimilated to the palette of the general White American population and many dishes were made up and presented as authentically Asian. Some of these dishes have become iconic when thinking of classic American foods—chow mein, orange chicken, and more. For many non-Asian Americans, these popular dishes contribute to the pairing of Asian Americans with food and the food industry. But for Asian Americans, these dishes symbolize their struggles—leaving their homes and families behind, trying to live out the American dream, assimilating and changing their foods in just the right way in order to fit in, be accepted, and to survive. This project, in the form of a cookbook, examines the significance of food in the Chinese American, Japanese American, and Filipino American experiences in America while looking at the histories of those specific foods as well as histories of each group.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Japanese American Internment in Arizona

Description

The Japanese American internment in Arizona proved to be one of the greatest assaults on the civil liberties of American citizens in the 20th century. Families lived in shabby facilities,

The Japanese American internment in Arizona proved to be one of the greatest assaults on the civil liberties of American citizens in the 20th century. Families lived in shabby facilities, had meager food, fought isolation, and strict military control. However, they overcame these challenges and built a strong community relationship and courageously sought to prove their loyalty to a government that deemed them untrustworthy. With time, their fortitude and solidarity helped bring an end to World War II and create new lives afterwards.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Connect the Dots: Cultural and Social Capital and the Asian American Experience in Law School and After Graduation

Description

This paper explores the relationship between social and cultural capital and the experience of Asian Americans in law school and after graduating from law school. Bourdieu’s (1986) conceptualizations of institutional

This paper explores the relationship between social and cultural capital and the experience of Asian Americans in law school and after graduating from law school. Bourdieu’s (1986) conceptualizations of institutional cultural capital, embodied cultural capital, and social capital guide this analysis. Two electronic surveys resulted in participation by fourteen Asian American law students and nine Asian American law school graduates from American Bar Association-accredited law schools in the United States. The research design is qualitative, and a partial grounded theory approach based upon Charmaz’s (2006) work was utilized. Thematic coding, line-by-line coding, and focused coding were also used to analyze survey responses. Results demonstrate that there is a relationship between social and cultural capital and the experience of Asian Americans in law school and post-law school graduation. Institutional cultural capital, in the form of J.D. degrees, seems to influence the development of embodied cultural capital and social capital, particularly when considering membership in groups and forming personal and professional connections. When considering embodied cultural capital, family members appear to influence important personal characteristics that participants carry into law school and the workplace. These results may have implications for the larger trend of Asian Americans leaving large law firms; in addition, perceptions of embodied cultural capital may influence barriers to career advancement. Suggested areas for future research include the role of mentorship in Asian American career development, patterns within specific Asian American ethnic/cultural groups in the legal field, and the intersection of gender and Asian American identities in legal practice.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

End the Silence, End the Violence

Description

End the Silence, End the Violence is a creative project to aid victims of domestic violence. There is a website, pamphlet, video and presentation attached that explains statistics, encourages awareness,

End the Silence, End the Violence is a creative project to aid victims of domestic violence. There is a website, pamphlet, video and presentation attached that explains statistics, encourages awareness, and provides victims with access to shelters and legal resources. The website and the pamphlet are intended to put all resources in one place, making them easily accessible for victims of domestic violence. The legal terms were explained, helping any victims who may not have a legal background understand how the court process works. On the website, the adult court process is explained in simple language. Orders of protection are also explained, as well as how to access them, with the direct links to the forms provided. Domestic Violence Shelters in Maricopa county are also listed, along with contact information. All of these shelters were contacted, and were verified to be open for a minimum of one year from October, 2019, and are still accepting victims. No addresses were provided on either the website or the pamphlet, with the hopes that not providing locations will better protect the victims who are seeking help. The pamphlet includes these same shelter resources, along with contact information. The presentation includes domestic violence statistics, as well as important terms and definitions. Finally, there was a video to encourage awareness towards domestic violence. Purple and red paint was used to demonstrate common places these victims suffered abuse, with the purple representing sexual violence, and the red representing physical violence. Not all of the volunteers in the video are victims of domestic violence, but are all advocates for ending domestic violence and helping with prevention.

The website can be found at http://endyoursilence.org/

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Creative Process of Poetry Collection: “korean mourning rituals”

Description

My journey with “korean mourning rituals” began in search of understanding myself. Like many others, I use poetry as an emotional outlet, and as a way of understanding why I

My journey with “korean mourning rituals” began in search of understanding myself. Like many others, I use poetry as an emotional outlet, and as a way of understanding why I feel the way I do. Sometimes, even being able to put a name to what I feel. “korean mourning rituals” is a poetry collection comprised of 30 poems, created over the span of two years. “korean mourning rituals” is an accumulation of poems about intergenerational trauma, romantic relationships, family matters, and navigating the colonial settler state as a Korean american womxn. In this paper, I will be dissecting one poem selected for “korean mourning rituals,” and its editing process. Additionally, I will be discussing what I have planned for distribution of “korean mourning rituals,” as well as the self-publishing process and the different avenues I sought out.

One of the poems in my collection, “and the paperwork asks for my family’s history of mental health,” I dissect the intergenerational trauma of my Korean American family as a way to understand the guilt, sorrow, and difficulties buried within me. Intergenerational trauma is trauma transferred through the generations, even if those beyond the first-generation did not directly experience the traumatic incidents (Bombay, Matheson, Anisman, 2). This intergenerational trauma, when specifically tied to Koreans, is called, “han.” “Han” is described as a cultural phenomenon, that scholars often have trouble defining. Theologian Suh Nam-dong describes han as, “a feeling of unresolved resentment against injustices suffered, a sense of helplessness because of the overwhelming odds against one, a feeling of acute pain in one's guts and bowels, making the whole body writhe and squirm, and an obstinate urge to take revenge and to right the wrong—all these combined,” (Yoo, 221). Han, when applied to the Korean diaspora, is referred to as “postmemory han,” which refers to the feelings of han experienced by second-generation Korean Americans. “Postmemory han” is the idea that even if these second-generation Korean Americans did not directly experience the trauma the first-generation Koreans did, they still feel residual han, regardless of whether they actively pursue “remembering” their family’s trauma (Chu, 98-105). This “nonconsensual remembering,” is a concept I have, and continue to, explore throughout my written work, and is the nucleus of “korean mourning rituals.”

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Perceived control of the attribution process: measurement and theory

Description

The primary objective of this study was to develop the Perceived Control of the Attribution Process Scale (PCAPS), a measure of metacognitive beliefs of causality, or a perceived control of

The primary objective of this study was to develop the Perceived Control of the Attribution Process Scale (PCAPS), a measure of metacognitive beliefs of causality, or a perceived control of the attribution process. The PCAPS included two subscales: perceived control of attributions (PCA), and awareness of the motivational consequences of attributions (AMC). Study 1 (a pilot study) generated scale items, explored suitable measurement formats, and provided initial evidence for the validity of an event-specific version of the scale. Study 2 achieved several outcomes; Study 2a provided strong evidence for the validity and reliability of the PCA and AMC subscales, and showed that they represent separate constructs. Study 2b demonstrated the predictive validity of the scale and provided support for the perceived control of the attribution process model. This study revealed that those who adopt these beliefs are significantly more likely to experience autonomy and well-being. Study 2c revealed that these constructs are influenced by context, yet they lead to adaptive outcomes regardless of this contextual-specificity. These findings suggest that there are individual differences in metacognitive beliefs of causality and that these differences have measurable motivational implications.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014