Matching Items (3)

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The Respect Movement: An Evaluation of a Student-Driven Sexual Assault Intervention at Arizona State University

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Abstract: This purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of a student-driven sexual assault intervention at Arizona State University. The first aim is to develop a

Abstract: This purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of a student-driven sexual assault intervention at Arizona State University. The first aim is to develop a theoretical framework of the organization and its relation to the Integrated Behavioral Health model. The second aim analyze change in attitudes and beliefs about sexual violence and bystander behaviors as well as barriers and facilitators of change including perceived control and self-efficacy for students involved in the Respect Movement. The final aim is to analyze how this change transmits through the broader social network of students involved in the Respect Movement.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Recovery 101: providing peer-to-peer support to students in recovery

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Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are university-sanctioned initiatives for students in recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Given the ever-rising rates of alcohol and opioid use and misuse, a great

Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are university-sanctioned initiatives for students in recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Given the ever-rising rates of alcohol and opioid use and misuse, a great need exists to understand how to provide support for those who are considering recovery or who choose a recovery lifestyle in college. The purpose of this action research study was to examine peer-to-peer support for students in recovery. The development of two training innovations, Recovery 101 and Recovery Ally, were delivered to health and wellness peer educators called the Well Devil Ambassadors (WDAs) with the goal of equipping them to better support their peers in recovery. Learning objectives for the training were to gain knowledge about addiction and recovery and to enhance positive attitudes toward students in recovery, which could thereby increase self-efficacy and behavior intention to work with their peers in recovery. Mindfulness was included in the trainings to enhance the WDAs’ experience and provide tools for a self-care skillset. Quantitative data included pre, post, and follow-up surveys for the Recovery 101 training. Qualitative data included short-answer questions following Recovery 101 training and in-depth interviews following Recovery Ally training. Findings indicated that the information provided in Recovery 101 built the WDAs’ knowledge on the topics of addiction and recovery; hearing multiple perspectives from students in recovery allowed the WDAs to increase empathy toward students in recovery; and the building of knowledge, empathy, and mindfulness allowed the WDAs to gain self-efficacy and behavior intention when supporting their peers in recovery.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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Relationship between perceived stress and depression in college students

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Other studies have previously demonstrated that perceived stress and maladaptive stress management can lead to harmful outcomes including depression, morbidity, and mortality. College students (especially freshmen) have more difficulty dealing

Other studies have previously demonstrated that perceived stress and maladaptive stress management can lead to harmful outcomes including depression, morbidity, and mortality. College students (especially freshmen) have more difficulty dealing with stress, which can increase their susceptibility to engage in high risk behaviors. The importance of conducting this research is to discover the effects that perceived stress levels may have on depression outcomes in college students, and to evaluate the influence of health related behaviors on this relationship. This study used a retrospective cross-sectional correlational design to examine correlations between perceived stress, physical activity, and other health behaviors on clinical and perceived depression in college students. A random sample of 20,000 students was drawn from 62,476 students enrolled at Arizona State University (ASU). Participants included 2,238 students who volunteered to take the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) in spring 2009. Supplemental questions for ASU students were developed by ASU Wellness and administered as a part of the ACHA-NCHA II. The university sent an invitation email, wherein students were directed through a hyperlink to the survey website. ACHA provided institutional survey data in an SPSS file for analysis. The data were evaluated with Spearman Rho Correlation Analysis and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. There were more female participants (n = 580) than males (n = 483), both averaged 23 years of age. Men had greater height, weight, and body mass index than females, all were significant mean differences. There were more significant correlations between health factors and having perceived depression than with having real or diagnosed depression. Logistic regression showed that out of all variables and behaviors studied, only high levels of stress, poor general health, substance use, and gender (female) resulted in significant odds in predicting that a participant would be in one of the depression categories. This research suggests that addressing these factors may be important to prevent and reduce depression among college students. This study provides empirical evidence that there is a significant relationship between perceived stress and depression among college students, and that health behaviors such as substance abuse have a negative mediating effect on this relationship.

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Date Created
  • 2011