Matching Items (20)

United In Movement: A Dance Mural Aimed at Community Inclusion

Description

The objective of this community mural was aimed at cultural inclusion. I worked with the Borden community to paint a mural of dances from different parts of the world. I

The objective of this community mural was aimed at cultural inclusion. I worked with the Borden community to paint a mural of dances from different parts of the world. I wanted to do this as my creative project because as an artist, the community I lived in (the Borden Community) allowed me to explore my artistic self. The Borden community is a mile away from ASU and it is where I lived for the past two years--the time I was truly able to start creating the dancer within me. The mural was painted on una and lemon street, right behind the fire station located on Apache Blvd. Through the project I have grown more as an artist and as a community member. I see relationships built through the project and I now feel like I have been able to give back to the community that helped create a part of my college experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

136343-Thumbnail Image.png

Anthropology, Dance, and Education: Integrated Curriculum in Social Studies

Description

Students not only deserve to be actively involved and engaged in learning content knowledge, but it can in fact help them learn better. Arguably too few classrooms actually utilize teaching

Students not only deserve to be actively involved and engaged in learning content knowledge, but it can in fact help them learn better. Arguably too few classrooms actually utilize teaching methods that support this kind of environment. There is perhaps fear that methods like integrated curriculum may detract from student knowledge. The purpose of this intervention study was to determine how the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework effects student learning of content knowledge in social studies, as well as student attitude toward the topic. Research questions that were addressed in this study are the following: (a) How does the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework affect students' chapter test scores when compared to typical instruction?; (b) How does the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework affect students' attitude toward social studies when compared to typical instruction?. Participants were two 6th grade classes at the same elementary school. As a supplement to a unit on Ancient Egypt, the experimental group received four intervention lessons, taught by the investigator, incorporating creative dance to encourage student exploration and increased understanding of content. An anthropological framework was also implemented to foster respectful investigation of culture. Results show that at posttest the intervention group had significantly higher content knowledge, as measured by a chapter test, compared to the control group. This suggests that this program did in fact help students to reach a better understanding of content. Though surveys showed no difference in attitude between groups or over the course of the study, qualitative student responses from the experimental group suggest extremely positive feelings towards concepts covered in the intervention lessons.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

136581-Thumbnail Image.png

111 Steps to the Steel Door: A Movement Exploration of the Journey from Death Row to the Death Chamber

Description

Today's prison industrial complex in the United States often dehumanizes inmates simply because they are criminals. Members of the free society are generally too far removed from the inside of

Today's prison industrial complex in the United States often dehumanizes inmates simply because they are criminals. Members of the free society are generally too far removed from the inside of prisons that most people do not see the harsh and cruel conditions for and treatment of prisoners. As a Dance and Justice Studies major at Arizona State University, I was curious about how to intertwine my interests in dance and justice. This paper chronicles my exploration of adding a human rights issue to my dance practice through choreographing a solo dance performance based on Cleve Foster's unusual experience on death row. Research on theories of prison and punishment in American society combined with physical research in the dance studio enabled me to create a solo performance that shed light on the inhumane conditions for and treatment of prison inmates in today's society. Through the process, I found that some elements of my dance practice stayed the same, while others changed. This informed me of what continuously remains important to me, while allowing me to expand my personal dance practice. I ultimately discovered a bridge between my two passions, dance and justice, and learned a meaningful way to convey a contemporary social justice issue to the general public.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

136152-Thumbnail Image.png

Dance Around The Globe: Kinesthetic Education & Cultural Understanding

Description

The globalization of dance offers a unique situation to encourage peace. The kinesthetic experience associated with dance builds communities and unites people without needing to share the same language or

The globalization of dance offers a unique situation to encourage peace. The kinesthetic experience associated with dance builds communities and unites people without needing to share the same language or be in the same location on the planet. Dance is a vehicle to understand other cultures but how can people be given the keys? As the 2014 Circumnavigator Travel Study Grant recipient for Arizona State University (ASU), I traveled to six countries in three continents over seventy-two days conducting ethnochoreology (dance ethnography) research. Upon returning I had a passion to share my experience through dance. Therefore I organized a charity dance concert. To share my kinesthetic education from my trip I taught six high schools each a dance from the countries I visited. An additional high school, elementary school and ASU students joined the concert. The performers and audience members gained new understanding, curiosity and appreciation. The proceeds of the concert have started a new scholarship for ASU students pursuing dance or studying abroad. This journey has come full circle just like the Circumnavigator trip which began this project. Knowledge of other dances from around the world invites participants to see into the heart of the culture, creating empathy. Therefore dance can ignite peace.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

152628-Thumbnail Image.png

I went to the end of time, and this is what I found: a look into the making of a solo performance

Description

I'll go to the end of time for you (and you don't even know my name) is an evening-length solo performance created and performed by Kristopher K.Q. Pourzal. It premiered

I'll go to the end of time for you (and you don't even know my name) is an evening-length solo performance created and performed by Kristopher K.Q. Pourzal. It premiered November 8-10, 2013 in the Margaret Gisolo Dance Theatre of Arizona State University. The solo was the culmination (suspension, really) of a wild creative journey, the distillation of a process that initially involved several collaborators. Through a series of neurotically/erotically repetitive episodes of self-composed song, text, and dance, the work mines questions of the desire to be seen and the desire to feel alive. The conventions and constructs of the proscenium stage are both utilized and subverted in examining this platform as uniquely suited for revealing the nature of these experiences and their potential relationship. This document is primarily an account of the show's process--its before and after--and serves as a site of exploration, explanation, analysis, reflection, questioning, and ultimately furtherance of the practice-based research made manifest in the performances.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

154560-Thumbnail Image.png

Paseo: becoming self

Description

Paseo is a postmodern dance performance that reveals the migrational passage of bodies through space and time. Paseo included five dance participants, and the choreographer/pedagogue. Paseo members participated in rehearsal

Paseo is a postmodern dance performance that reveals the migrational passage of bodies through space and time. Paseo included five dance participants, and the choreographer/pedagogue. Paseo members participated in rehearsal and performance events that completed the investigational study. The creative process focused on integrating somatic and improvisational movement practices to design an environment where dancers could build body-mind awareness and sensitivity to their surroundings, participate democratically, and build agency in their performative decision-making. Paseo investigated the performance as an informal site for learning and understanding of migration, identity, and community. Another objective of Paseo was to explore the performance as an informal site of learning and its transformative effects on lived experiences that occur from the act of doing, the act of becoming, and experiential sensations.

Paseo was part of the Arizona State University’s (ASU) School of Film, Dance, and Theatre Emerging Artists I series, one of two performances that shared the stage with fellow graduate cohort member, Grace Gallagher. Paseo took place at ASU’s Margaret Gisolo Theatre, located at the Physical Education Building East. Performance dates were the following; fix punctuation Friday, November 6th, Saturday, November 7th, and Sunday, November 8th. Paseo had a fourth presentation on Saturday, December 5th, 2015, at Margaret Gisolo Theatre as part of the post-conference performance and dialogue event, “By The People.” The conference was hosted by the Participatory Government Initiative on the ASU Campus from December 3rd-5th, 2015.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

157185-Thumbnail Image.png

Fusion art with I Ching: an Interdisciplinary Choreography Project

Description

Cultural background is very important for people, and people from different cultural backgrounds will have different understandings of art. This document explores how individuals relate to other cultures and incorporate

Cultural background is very important for people, and people from different cultural backgrounds will have different understandings of art. This document explores how individuals relate to other cultures and incorporate the advantages of Chinese cultural values into contemporary dance experiences as researched for the applied project, III. This project uses the Bagua theory in the ancient Chinese book the I Ching to carry out the process of collaborative creation through different art forms in collaboration with artists from different mediums. This document details the artist’s process of self-exploration and creative expansion using personal cultural background and influences (both Eastern and Western). Through this research the artist has come to understand and develop unique personal perspectives and formulate a creative method that she will continue to use in the future; it centers the importance of cultural identity and how that shapes experiences of art and art-making.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

153999-Thumbnail Image.png

Worth the weight: the sustainability of breaking culture in Phoenix, Arizona

Description

This document outlines the formation and development of Worth the Weight, or WTW, a platform that seeks to sustain the Breaking community in Phoenix, Arizona and connect the generations by

This document outlines the formation and development of Worth the Weight, or WTW, a platform that seeks to sustain the Breaking community in Phoenix, Arizona and connect the generations by bringing them together in a newly and never before seen event in Breaking, an all weight class and division competition. In the last five to ten years there has been a noticeable decline in the local Breaking community, in part due to the introduction of new dance categories, economic and social changes, the cross over of academia and traditional studios in Phoenix; all combining to create a lack of longevity in veterans of the culture to pass on the tools of the trade to the next generation.

WTW is an event that occurs monthly for three consecutive months followed by a month off, totaling nine events and three seasons per calendar year. At each event dancers go head to head in battle in a single elimination style bracket, where they will add a loss or win to their overall season record. The goals of WTW are self-empowerment as well as ownership and investment in the community by those involved through participation in both the event and the planning process; all built on a foundation of trust within the Breaking community. This researcher has thirty years of direct involvement in the Breaking culture with twenty-two of those years as a practitioner in Phoenix, Arizona and co-founder of Furious Styles Crew, Arizona’s longest running Breaking crew. The development of WTW was drawn from this experience along with interviews and observations of Breaking communities worldwide. WTW intends to provide a reliable and consistent outlet during a time of instant gratification, allowing a space for self-discovery and the development of tools to be applied beyond movement. It is hoped that the format of WTW will be a model that can be adapted by other Breaking communities worldwide.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

153796-Thumbnail Image.png

Every body holds a story: empowerment through social-somatics and community dance within a K-12 dance education program

Description

Every body holds a story. Those stories are rich with physical movements to be expressed, and through the physical expression comes self-awareness and transformation. A partnership between Arizona State University

Every body holds a story. Those stories are rich with physical movements to be expressed, and through the physical expression comes self-awareness and transformation. A partnership between Arizona State University and Arcadia High School was the vehicle in which I implemented a curriculum built around somatic experiences and communal beliefs and values. The framework for this investigated curriculum teaches students' embodiment of self, tolerance and acceptance in collaboration, life skills through applied constructivist principles, and increased critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. This research involved somatic exercises enabling participants to have insight into natural moving patterns, how such patterns relate to others and outside environments. Research concluded with collective dialogue around individual and shared experiences. I worked twice per week with a choreography class with a four unit curriculum. From varying modes of assessment (e.g., one-on-one interviews, group discussions, journals, surveys, ongoing observations) students' responses to this type of curriculum ranged from excitement and curiosity to frustrating and provoking. Although these areas of research are not necessarily new to the field of dance and education, gaps in dialogue, published work, and reliable resources prove these theories and methods are still valued and necessary. This research demonstrates the imperative demand in dance education for deeper connections of self-discovery.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

151462-Thumbnail Image.png

Embodied continuity: weaving the body into a web of artistry and ethnography

Description

Embodied Continuity documents the methodology of Entangled/Embraced, a dance performance piece presented December, 2011 and created as an artistic translation of research conducted January-May, 2011 in the states of Karnataka

Embodied Continuity documents the methodology of Entangled/Embraced, a dance performance piece presented December, 2011 and created as an artistic translation of research conducted January-May, 2011 in the states of Karnataka and Kerala, South India. Focused on the sciences of Ayurveda, Kalaripayattu and yoga, this research stems from an interest in body-mind connectivity, body-mind-environment continuity, embodied epistemology and the implications of ethnography within artistic practice. The document begins with a theoretical grounding covering established research on theories of embodiment; ethnographic methodologies framing research conducted in South India including sensory ethnography, performance ethnography and autoethnography; and an explanation of the sciences of Ayurveda, Kalaripayattu and yoga with a descriptive slant that emphasizes concepts of embodiment and body-mind-environment continuity uniquely inherent to these sciences. Following the theoretical grounding, the document provides an account of methods used in translating theoretical concepts and experiences emerging from research in India into the creation of the Entangled/Embraced dance work. Using dancer and audience member participation to inspire emergent meanings and maintain ethnographic consciousness, Embodied Continuity demonstrates how concepts inspiring research interests, along with ideas emerging from within research experiences, in addition to philosophical standpoints embedded in the ethnographic methodologies chosen to conduct research, weave into the entire project of Entangled/Embraced to unite the phases of research and performance, ethnography and artistry.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012