Matching Items (24)

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Capitalism and Mental Illness: An Investigation of How Our Culture Makes Us Sick

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The purpose of this thesis is to examine the relationship between mental illness and capitalist consumer society. Many Americans are suffering from mental illness and there has to be something

The purpose of this thesis is to examine the relationship between mental illness and capitalist consumer society. Many Americans are suffering from mental illness and there has to be something causing it besides a chemical imbalance in the brain. A capitalist society creates a set of expectations that conflict with human desires. The thesis takes a historical, economical, and psychological approach to answering the following question: Does a capitalist society make its citizens mentally sick? A brief history of capitalism over the past century is discussed, as well as a more in depth look at capitalism and the creation of neoliberalism during the 1980s. The psychological effects capitalism has on human beings is discussed for the majority of the thesis and focuses on ideas from the 1950s as well as the early 2000s. To show the effect capitalism has on modern day society, an analysis of a psychopharmaceutical drug commercial is given. The concluding thoughts attempt to offer solutions to the problems of human unhappiness in a consumer culture.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Most Sublime Object of Ideology: Reworking Government's Sublime Object

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The source of governmental power is the Zizekian sublime object of ideology. This object is composed of demands that are enforced by a force that is vast and powerful beyond

The source of governmental power is the Zizekian sublime object of ideology. This object is composed of demands that are enforced by a force that is vast and powerful beyond comprehension. It is the Lacanian Symbolic Order enforced by the fear of castration by the Other. The evolution of government is characterized by the use of more subversive power mechanisms. The more subversive these mechanisms, the more they resemble the Symbolic Order and the greater their effectiveness. Marx outlines a progression of governmental structures. At each point of change, there is great unrest amongst the population. In this way, unrest and protest are indicative of a need for the change i.e., protest is a symptom of a system in need of revolution. There is a growing sense of unrest, particularly in the United States, characterized by growing participation in protest movements. The government is oftentimes responding with violence, a sign that the rules of its sublime object are failing to do their job. Thus, there must be a substitution for the current sublime object. Existentialist humanism seems to be the best substitution available because it promotes the safe release of instinctual drives while still promoting social cohesion. Humanism values all parts of the human condition and recognizes that human shortcomings are simply a fact of life. Recognition of peoples' tendency to fail and to later overcome these failures is a failsafe built into the new sublime object, thus preserving civil society in a way that religion or neo-liberal ideas cannot.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Conservation Conundrum: Living Religiously through Sustainability and Liberation Theology

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This thesis reflects on how we understand the psyche, religion, and care for the Earth and the suffering Other. Through a hermeneutic walk through the works of Martin Heidegger, John

This thesis reflects on how we understand the psyche, religion, and care for the Earth and the suffering Other. Through a hermeneutic walk through the works of Martin Heidegger, John D. Caputo, and Friedrich Nietzsche, we come to have an understanding of the incredible importance of words, language, and stories. Technological language is taken as a threat to what makes humans unique, if it makes us say that what matters most must be able to be measured. The myth of Cupid and Psyche leads us to an understanding that the psyche is made of words, and that stories are true, not factual. The way in which meditative thinking requires us to open to other ideas leads us to postmodernism. A discussion of Pope Francis's encyclical, "Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home," aims to persuade Catholics that climate change is a complex and real issue worthy of our attention. As people of faith, we must acknowledge our sins against the Earth and against the poor. We have the power to create positive change, yet we waste our resources. Evidence is given that the poor are effected at a greater degree by climate change. Liberation theology is discussed as one way Catholics can care for the suffering Other. Through my reading of Caputo's "On Religion," we are all more religious than we think, and therefore must all play a part in the care of our common home. A new and more inclusive conversation from a place of love about all of these issues is needed to create revolutionary change.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

Dwelling in the Dream

Description

It seems that we are incessantly scolded about the importance of the American political process and its virtue of practicality in contemporary society. Whether through the accumulation of the so-called

It seems that we are incessantly scolded about the importance of the American political process and its virtue of practicality in contemporary society. Whether through the accumulation of the so-called facts about the issues that inform the veneration of the contest between candidates, the stern and noble duty of becoming an activist performing dreary tasks, or the religious fervor surrounding the sacred obligation of voting, we are assured and reassured that our system is sound and that we must only confront problems of implementation rather than structural ones. From here, the narrative goes that if we subscribe to the doctrine of exclusively employing the efficient, strictly rational, and the immediately realistic, we will almost assuredly succeed in persuading others toward producing the resolutions required to solve our shared challenges. Admittedly, these ideas serve a role in addressing the issues we face. However, when unaided by sophisticated and nuanced notions and applications of the fantastic, the beautiful, the ideal, the possible, the playful, the useless, in a word, dreaming, we foreclose the possibility of building a future that can qualitatively improve society and more meaningfully elevate our being-with-one-another in the world. Therefore, this work aims to validate the aforementioned claim by engaging in a critical, political, and hermeneutic exploration of what it means to dream against the backdrop of present-day American politics. It will honestly seek to analyze the prevailing notions of contemporary western thought and action to work on the way toward a new, yet latent, way of understanding. This understanding would fundamentally revolutionize the task of civilization as being grounded upon the appropriate channeling of our desires and dissatisfactions toward actualizing the projections of our imagination. Simply put, this project seeks to repudiate the mandate of work as toil and order as oppression to clear the way for envisioning a more suitable alternative.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Rewording Revolution: A Philosophical Detour Through Romanticism and Feminism

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My thesis argues Romanticism and feminism are utopian allies, and Romanticism, understood as a philosophical movement, should be recognized as an essential aspect of critical feminist theory. I claim feminism

My thesis argues Romanticism and feminism are utopian allies, and Romanticism, understood as a philosophical movement, should be recognized as an essential aspect of critical feminist theory. I claim feminism must be understood as holding an undischarged utopian potential, liberated and inspired by a dynamic neo-Romanticism. This critical discourse gives birth to Romantic-feminism, which reinterprets Romantic works and rereads feminist theory, cultivating their shared revolutionary aspirations. While the claim that feminism buoys Romanticism—potentially creating a space for a singularly genuine kind of Romantic thought—is fairly bold, the core of this project rests upon an argument of even greater magnitude: feminism is as in need of Romanticism as Romanticism is in need of feminism. In fact, feminism is in desperate want of the revolutionary, aesthetic, and utopian vision of Romanticism, and a reinvented, reinvigorated feminism capable of confronting grave contemporary issues will not be possible without philosophical and artistic Romantic influence. A dynamic and progressive feminism not only betters Romantic texts, but provides the only possible condition for the realization of genuine revolution within Romanticism as a whole . As such, the second half of this project focuses on close readings of three poems by 19th-century women: “On Being Cautioned Against Walking on an Headland Overlooking the Sea because it was Frequented by a Lunatic” by Charlotte Smith, “The Lily” by Mary Tighe, and “Lines of Life” by Letitia Elizabeth Landon. Approaching these Romantic works will necessitate an openness and welcoming of both tradition and the strange, a critical emphasis on intersectional feminist concerns, an innovative critique of modernity informed by Marxist and socialist thought, a willingness to transform (the text, the self, and the world), and revolutionary and utopian desires.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Costumes, identity, and performance: Cosplay and the empowered public speaker

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This Barrett, the Honors College senior thesis connects the experiences of cosplay with public speaking confidence. “Cosplay, abbreviated from the word ‘costume play,’ is a performance art in which the

This Barrett, the Honors College senior thesis connects the experiences of cosplay with public speaking confidence. “Cosplay, abbreviated from the word ‘costume play,’ is a performance art in which the participant masquerades as a character from a selected film, television, video game, or comic book” (Gn, 2011, p. 583). The ability to “cosplay” in front of other relies on performing in front of an audience much like public speaking. When students speak with confidence, students will know their ideas are being expressed with conviction and assurance. Having the ability to speak professionally and publicly, is a highly valued skill in the workforce and key to success in all types of employment. Communication skills are frequently a top factor in determining whether a college student will obtain employment (Beebe & Beebe, 2006, p. 275-276). Despite their different definitions, there are multiple connections between cosplay and public speaking. This thesis explores the connection between peer support and belief in one’s self in both cosplay and public speaking. Now those who have direct support become self-reliant and confident as a result of these connections. This projects highlights Goffman’s identity theory, the Pygmalion effect, theories of fashion and identity, role-play, narrative paradigm, dramatism, and non-verbal communication, and explores how cosplay can contribute to the formation of one’s public speaking persona. The issue of anxiety is also included in the conversation as it is central to both cosplay and public speaking. Ultimately, this thesis explores the questions: Can cosplay help students become empowered public speakers?

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Put the Camera on My Feet, I'm Ready for My Close-up: A Cinematic Analysis of the Psychological Power of the Modern Dance Film Genre

Description

This thesis takes four modern dance genre films — Footloose (1984), Save the Last Dance, Take the Lead, and Step Up 2: The Streets — and analyzes them through the

This thesis takes four modern dance genre films — Footloose (1984), Save the Last Dance, Take the Lead, and Step Up 2: The Streets — and analyzes them through the psychological concepts of trust, self-esteem, and prejudice. This thesis begins by identifying the cinematic elements of the dance film genre. It then explores and explains the underlying psychological elements and the impact they have on the film viewers. This thesis contains three chapters that will explore the significance of this new genre. Chapter One will describe how documentary dance films differ from fictional dance films. This will be followed by a history of the fictional dance films beginning with foundational films Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Dirty Dancing (1987) as a gateway to the modern dance film storylines. Chapter Two identifies the genre elements of modern dance films in regards to the typical characters, settings, and filmic devices. Chapter Three provides an in-depth view of the psychological concepts of trust, self-esteem, and prejudice, showing how they are integrated in the lessons the characters and audience learn throughout the films. The purpose of the thesis is to educate readers that dance films not only have an entertaining element, but also the ability to offer a deeper psychological understanding through the audience identification with the characters.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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VERSING INHERITANCE: THEORY, POETRY, POLITICS

Description

Theory has often been historically characterized as lacking pragmatisms and action necessary for social change. Thus, as this challenge between pragmatists and theorists continues to exist, this project attempts to

Theory has often been historically characterized as lacking pragmatisms and action necessary for social change. Thus, as this challenge between pragmatists and theorists continues to exist, this project attempts to disclose a manner in which we may alter this conflict by reinterpreting theory, poetry, and philosophy as active political moments of resistance that fundamentally change our ethical relationship with language and consequently to others. This thesis recognizes that dire political situations of social injustice require a more materialistic and sociological analysis in order to achieve structural reform for marginalized groups. However, this work attempts to show how an ethical relationship with theory, poetry, and philosophy is requisite to cultural and material change, as these meditative ways of thinking hold a stake in the overall discussion of social progress as well.

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  • 2014-12

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The Restructuring of Masculinity The Rise of the Bromantic and Homosocial Culture

Description

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like gay and straight. Feelings are no longer foreign and inaccessible to men, and this has led them to a greater understanding of themselves. Man is currently on the road that woman has been on for many years, that being of close knit friendships that resemble homosexual relationships; and even though this mimicry (or rather appropriation) has come at a much later time, man is now closer than ever to the tipping point for a new masculinity. Through philosophy, sociology, gender studies, social theory, psychoanalysis, and pop culture (specifically film and television) this paper reveals what bromance has already done and could potentially do for man and eventually for humanity.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Befriending Suffering: Re-Imagining the Patient-Doctor Relationship

Description

Techno-scientific thinking, which has become firmly grounded in modern medicine, moves towards reifying medicine as a science, losing all aspects of what it means to heal beyond curing a patient’s

Techno-scientific thinking, which has become firmly grounded in modern medicine, moves towards reifying medicine as a science, losing all aspects of what it means to heal beyond curing a patient’s physical malady. A blueprint has been made on how best to interact with patients, a formulaic way of approaching medicine that seeks to get to the bottom of the patient’s biological disease. But this blueprint is the very reason doctors and patients misrecognize the potential befriending suffering has to heal the psychological dis-ease the patient feels when confronted by suffering. Thus, the process of treating patients is in need of reform. To do this, we must recover the dimension of depth that has been seemingly lost in the medical field. Doctors and patients alike should be critical of this systematic way of thinking about the doctor-patient relationship, a way of thinking that has far more implications than typically recognized. Science itself is not the problem; rather, it is thinking that says science is the only way one ought to approach and understand medicine and the only way to cure patients when there is much more to healing than curing.
In befriending suffering, one has the opportunity to re-understand herself and reorient herself to the world. Through dialogue, one can befriend her suffering and attempt to hear what it might be saying to her. Furthermore, by being a virtuous friend to her suffering, being one who is sincere, reverent, tender, and effortful, one can discover the generative aspects of suffering. By turning toward suffering together, the doctor and patient can connect in a way that better helps them understand themselves and each other. By understanding themselves and their individual suffering, each has the possibility of becoming a more authentic person and living more meaningfully in their daily lives. In understanding each other, the doctor has the potential to heal her patients—and patients, one could say, have the potential to heal their doctors as well. To do this, both must enter into conversation openly and with the virtues of friendship in mind. It may be difficult, but each one’s worldview might expand and new insights gleaned. By coming together, each has the possibility of living better individually.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05