Matching Items (5)

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Natural Family Planning in Evidence Based Practice: Implementing a True Method of Family Planning in Client Education Programs.

Description

Family planning educational programs offer a list of artificial contraceptive methods to couples wishing to avoid a pregnancy; however, many of these methods have disadvantages: many lead to negative individual

Family planning educational programs offer a list of artificial contraceptive methods to couples wishing to avoid a pregnancy; however, many of these methods have disadvantages: many lead to negative individual and environmental health outcomes, do not promote a sense of fertility awareness in women and men, may be culturally incompatible with certain religious beliefs and worldviews, and do not take into account the full extent of family planning, which includes the ability to achieve as well as to avoid a pregnancy. Natural Family Planning (NFP) is a true method of family planning in that it offers to the couple the option to achieve as well as avoid a pregnancy. NFP methods holistically approach fertility by taking into account the woman's unique fertility cycle and patterns, the need for the couple to understand complex fertility issues, and the needs and family planning intentions of the couple as a whole. This thesis utilizes Evidence Based Practice in an effort to search the best literature regarding the effectiveness of Natural Family Planning methods to avoid a pregnancy, in comparison to the effectiveness of artificial contraceptive methods to avoid a pregnancy. If effectiveness rates are similar, it is reasonable for the health care profession to consider Natural Family Planning as a valid and reliable family planning method, to move towards further research on its effectiveness and benefits, and to implement a practice change by including it in family planning client education programs.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes of Perinatal Substance Abuse

Description

Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study.

Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Online survey. Participants: Nurses (N=104) who are members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and subscribe to their perinatal listserv were invited to participate via email. Methods: Participants completed a survey, which included a modified version of the Attitudes about Drug Abuse in Pregnancy (AADAP) questionnaire, knowledge questions, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Statistical analysis was conducted. Results: Most nurses (88.46%) have cared for a newborn affected by NAS or their mother before, and every respondent has cared for an opioid-addicted patient. Most nurse respondents (82.69%) reported breastfeeding being a very common topic of discussion with patients, yet 78 (75%) reported being poorly prepared by nursing school in this topic. Despite this, the majority answered the knowledge questions correctly. Most respondents (94.23%) reported that they would assess the possibility of breastfeeding for women who used drugs during pregnancy, and 39.42% expressed that prenatal drug use should be considered child abuse. Conclusion: Despite feeling angry at mothers who perinatally abuse drugs, nurses recognize the benefits of breastfeeding for these patients. Self-assessment can help nurses identify personal bias and implement evidence-based nursing interventions

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Spina Bifida Cross-Sectional Study

Description

The number of individuals born with the neural tube defect, spina bifida, is still widespread here in the United States. To briefly explain, spina bifida is a birth defect where

The number of individuals born with the neural tube defect, spina bifida, is still widespread here in the United States. To briefly explain, spina bifida is a birth defect where the baby's vertebrae does not fully enclose the spinal cord. There are specifically four types of spina bifida, with varying degrees of severity. This severity can range from no symptoms to complete paralysis below the cleft area. To put this issue into perspective, approximately 166,000 individuals in the United States, today, are affected by spina bifida (National Health Institute, 2017). The purpose of the study is to determine if there is a knowledge discrepancy of health care needs between individuals who have Spina Bifida and ASU students studying a health profession. This will determine if there is a need to improve health care education of students, professionals, and members of a spina bifida association in respect to spina bifida. Not only that, this study will also identify if there is a need to increase awareness and prevention of spina bifida in the community to improve health outcomes for those affected by spina bifida. A total of 136 participants were studied with the 32-question survey. It was found, through the survey, that there was a knowledge mismatch between spina bifida members and ASU students who were studying a health profession. This knowledge mismatch was also compared with how well they answered the various questions as a group.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Barriers to Physical Activity for the Adult Transgender Population

Description

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that transgender individuals

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender individuals do. This suggests that the transgender population may face additional or unique barriers to physical activity. The purpose of this study was to further examine and identify these barriers for adult transgender individuals regardless of whether they decided to, were in the process of, or completed medical transition. Five categories of physical activity barriers were analyzed within a survey: time, motivation, accessibility, emotions, and social factors. This online physical activity questionnaire was distributed to transgender adults 18 years or older over a course of two months. Twelve responses were received but only nine of those met the inclusion criteria and were used in the study (n=9). Three questions were asked for each barrier category and were formatted as a Likert scale. Each question and barrier category was given a score based on if the responses indicated that particular instance as a barrier to physical activity or not. The results of the survey responses showed that social factors was the highest reported barrier to physical activity for transgender adults. Emotions was the second highest reported barrier, while accessibility was the lowest reported barrier. The responses from this study indicate that transgender adults do experience different or additional barriers to physical activity when compared to the general population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

Barriers to Physical Activity for the Adult Transgender Population

Description

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to
physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that
transgender individuals

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to
physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that
transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender
individuals do. This suggests that the transgender population may face additional or unique
barriers to physical activity. The purpose of this study was to further examine and identify these
barriers for adult transgender individuals regardless of whether they decided to, were in the
process of, or completed medical transition. Five categories of physical activity barriers were
analyzed within a survey: time, motivation, accessibility, emotions, and social factors. This
online physical activity questionnaire was distributed to transgender adults 18 years or older over
a course of two months. Twelve responses were received but only nine of those met the inclusion
criteria and were used in the study (n=9). Three questions were asked for each barrier category
and were formatted as a Likert scale. Each question and barrier category was given a score based
on if the responses indicated that particular instance as a barrier to physical activity or not. The
results of the survey responses showed that social factors was the highest reported barrier to
physical activity for transgender adults. Emotions was the second highest reported barrier, while
accessibility was the lowest reported barrier. The responses from this study indicate that
transgender adults do experience different or additional barriers to physical activity when
compared to the general population.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12