Matching Items (6)

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Problematic Peer Behaviors Among Older Adults in Low-Income Housing

Description

Abstract The purpose of this study is to draw attention to problematic peer behaviors experienced among older adults in low income housing. Antagonistic behaviors including peer bullying are commonly associated

Abstract The purpose of this study is to draw attention to problematic peer behaviors experienced among older adults in low income housing. Antagonistic behaviors including peer bullying are commonly associated with youth yet they also occur among older adults. This study shares findings from a recent study of negative social interactions among older adults in independent low-income housing. Using a sample size of 11 tenants, and semi-structured interviews, this author used thematic analysis to code and categorize themes. This author found that common themes included types of behaviors experienced, contributing factors, interventions and perceived barriers to interventions. Results indicated that tenants experienced a variety of antagonistic behaviors including verbal, physical and relational aggression. The most common behaviors reported were verbal threatening (36.4%) and being gossiped about (54.4%). The least common reported were physical behaviors (27.3%). Tenants reported the most common contributing factor for the aggressor's actions as having mental health or emotional issues (45.5%), whereas they reported physical disability as the most common contributing factor in those who were victimized (54.5%). Individuals reported responding to these behaviors most commonly through isolation, withdrawal, and avoidance. Findings suggest the need for interventions to minimize bullying and other antagonistic behaviors in low-income housing. Additionally, findings suggest the need to help those who are mistreated to find ways to address the bullying in more positive ways. Keywords: themes, behaviors, factors, interventions, barriers

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Effectiveness of Art Therapy as an Anxiety Reducer with Homeless Young Adults in a Sex Trafficking Psycho-Education Group

Description

This study was conducted to look at the possible effects of art intervention on anxiety levels of homeless young adults in a local drop-in shelter. While there is a fair

This study was conducted to look at the possible effects of art intervention on anxiety levels of homeless young adults in a local drop-in shelter. While there is a fair amount of literature on art intervention and its applicability with vulnerable populations, its specific effect on anxiety has not been extensively examined. Researchers conducted two art interventions where state-trait anxiety (STAI Inventory) was measured before and after the interventions. Researchers hypothesized that anxiety would decrease after the art sessions. Some significant results were found. Participants reported feeling less strained (p = .041), worrying less over possible misfortunes (p = .02), feeling less nervous (p = .007) and feeling more decisive (p = .001). Future research recommendations are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Applying the Ecological Systems Theory to a Child Welfare Agency: Examining the Association Between Organizational Culture and Climate and Individual Level Factors

Description

ABSTRACT

The child welfare workforce is charged with the demanding work of ensuring the safety, well-being, and permanency of maltreated children. Although child welfare work can be rewarding, it is

ABSTRACT

The child welfare workforce is charged with the demanding work of ensuring the safety, well-being, and permanency of maltreated children. Although child welfare work can be rewarding, it is also associated with high levels of stress and burnout, causing challenges to retain staff. Developing organizational cultures and climates within child welfare agencies that are supportive of the workforce and strive to improve outcomes is essential. Applying the ecological systems theory to a child welfare agency provides for an understanding that the agency is comprised of different levels of systems with interactions between the systems. This study examined the association between the individual level factors of job satisfaction, coping skills, self-efficacy, burnout, job stress, and individual affect with organizational level factors including culture and climate. Child welfare workers from one regional area were invited to participate in an online survey utilizing the Comprehensive Organizational Health Assessment and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Results indicate that there is an association between each of the individual level factors and the organizational factors. The importance of the role of individual affect was highlighted in the results in that the level of affect reported was associated with corresponding ratings of the perception of the organizational culture and climate. These results provide implications for hiring, training, mentoring, and supervision. This study attempted to assess if the organizational culture and climate of individual child welfare units could be linked to permanency outcomes. This linkage was not possible in this study, however implications to conduct this type of research are made. Advancing the study of organizational culture and climate beyond the impact of such factors as job satisfaction and retention to linking to direct client outcomes is an emerging and important field of research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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An Exploration of Bias in Arizona’s Foster and Adoption Agencies

Description

The Arizona state child welfare system has recently experienced an increase in the number of children and youth living in out-of-home care. A lack of licensed foster homes has resulted

The Arizona state child welfare system has recently experienced an increase in the number of children and youth living in out-of-home care. A lack of licensed foster homes has resulted in many of these children residing in congregate care. This study sought to determine what role, if any, personal and policy bias against five demographic groups (i.e., ethnicity, sexual orientation, marital status for individuals and couples, and educational level) plays in this insufficiency of foster homes. In this pilot study a group of foster and adoption licensing agency executives and directors (n=5) were surveyed and qualitatively interviewed with the aim of discerning if bias is present at the personal and agency policy levels and to seek input for a future study with direct-service staff. Results indicate a discrepancy between personal and policy bias within agencies. Additionally, evidence suggests a policy bias which results in unmarried couples and single parents being perceived as inferior placement options. Implications for future research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Risk factors, unmet needs, and perceived service needs of gender/sexual minority emerging adults in Phoenix

Description

This exploratory quantitative study examined the risks and needs expressed by gender/sexual minority emerging adults in Phoenix, Arizona. Differences in experiences and perceived service needs between gender minorities and cisgender

This exploratory quantitative study examined the risks and needs expressed by gender/sexual minority emerging adults in Phoenix, Arizona. Differences in experiences and perceived service needs between gender minorities and cisgender sexual minority emerging adults were also identified. Respondents (N=102) completed a 78-item questionnaire in March and April of 2015. Individuals reported high rates of risk factors and physical needs, with those individuals who were both gender and ethnic minorities more likely to report having a perceived service need than their cisgender white counterparts. In addition, the study found significant positive correlations between housing factors (i.e., having experienced homelessness, ever/currently being in foster care, not having a safe/stable living situation) and other risk factors and needs. Risk factors were also correlated with wishing for a different gender identity or sexual orientation. With the majority of the respondents reporting a service need, implications include the need for culturally competent and accessible services, as well as services that continue to build on the protective factors of having an accepting family, friend group, and a sense of belonging to a community.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Prevalence rates of acute injection related injuries in a sample of persons who inject drugs in Phoenix, Arizona

Description

Opioid use in the United States is skyrocketing. Overdose deaths have increased 433% in

the last decade and will continue climbing. In addition to the mortality caused by illicit

opioid misuse, morbidity

Opioid use in the United States is skyrocketing. Overdose deaths have increased 433% in

the last decade and will continue climbing. In addition to the mortality caused by illicit

opioid misuse, morbidity rates have also risen. People Who Inject Drugs (PWID)

demonstrate higher rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus

(HCV), Endocarditis, Persistent Abscesses, Staphylococcus Aureus (S. aureus, Staph)

and other skin infections. This thesis serves as (1) a systematic review of the differences

in health conditions experienced by PWID and (2) an examination of the trends in skin

and soft tissue infection from a small sample in Phoenix, Arizona. The author argues that

PWID suffer from an increased rate of comorbid conditions associated with substance

use. Targeted social work interventions could be useful in reducing the rates of disease

and their impact on the individual and community.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019