Matching Items (19)

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Familismo: Can an obesity prevention curriculum targeted at Mexican-Americans effect the physical activity and eating habits of the complete family unit?

Description

The purpose of this study was to explore how the phenomenon of familismo effects behavioral change within the Mexican-American family if one member of the family participates in an obesity

The purpose of this study was to explore how the phenomenon of familismo effects behavioral change within the Mexican-American family if one member of the family participates in an obesity prevention curriculum. The qualitative approach findings indicate that the principle of familismo regarding perceived responsibility to provide emotional support to family members regarding changes in physical activity and dietary habits. Participants reported that their families are eating healthier, since, they started the obesity prevention curriculum. The findings regarding physical activity were inconclusive. This study can help nurses, because it emphasizes the importance of promoting family involvement as a motivator for behavioral change, in terms of physical activity and healthy diet eating, within Mexican-American populations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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One Does Not Simply De-Stress: A Blog of a Nursing Student's Stressors, Effects of Stress on Physical and Mental Health, and Effective Coping Methods

Description

This blog is to be used as a resource for communication
etworking and a tool for stress coping methods.
With this blog, it is my objective to aid my peers

This blog is to be used as a resource for communication
etworking and a tool for stress coping methods.
With this blog, it is my objective to aid my peers who might need help recognizing and coping with stress by the following methods:
a) Actualize the burden of Stress—Chronic stress is a burden and can be overwhelming if not managed. By disclosing my own stressors, it is my hope that peers will identify with me, so that I can then change the way they view and handle the stress.
b) Discuss the psychological and physical effects of stress on the body—It is my intent to clarify how unmanaged chronic stress can affect the physical and mental health and how acute stress is normal and healthy.
c) Share my coping methods that I have found effective in five minute or less videos with blurbs about how and why they are effective. I believe showing them to you in these mostly raw and unedited videos help maintain the current theme I am going for—keep things as real and raw as possible. Hopefully, these raw videos will help peers visualize working coping methods!

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Coping Skills Used by Nurses After the Death of a Pediatric Patient

Description

As the complexity and severity of hospitalized patients increase, nurses working in an acute care setting will experience patient deaths. From novice to expert, nurses may utilize a range of

As the complexity and severity of hospitalized patients increase, nurses working in an acute care setting will experience patient deaths. From novice to expert, nurses may utilize a range of coping strategies. When the patient is a pediatric patient, the coping strategies become critical. The purpose of this study is to explore the coping strategies used by novice and expert nurses when a pediatric patient dies. The second objective is to compare the coping strategies used by novice and expert nurses. The final objective is to determine if nurses feel nursing school and employee training prepared them for the death of a pediatric patient. Research has shown that nurses use many different coping strategies when faced with a patient's death (Abdullah, 2015; Kellogg, Baker, & McCune, 2014; Plante & Cry, 2011). Expert nurses who have years of experience should have more options for coping strategies than novice nurses, yet there is little evidence to support this. This qualitative descriptive study used structured in-depth interviews to explore the coping strategies of pediatric nurses when experiencing a patient's death. Using thematic analysis, transcripts of the interviews were coded such that themes emerged. Themes for novice nurses were compared to expert nurses. These themes were also placed into concepts that encompassed many similar themes. The findings help determine that there is a difference in the coping mechanisms used by novice and expert nurses, and there is a need for more education on coping strategies after the death of a pediatric patient.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

Description

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore,

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Exploring Perceptions of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Latino Adults: A Qualitative Approach

Description

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative CRC screening, Latinos as a group are of particular concern for CRC as they tend to have a lower screening rate, contributing to the possibility of late-stage diagnosis or even death. However, little is known about the perceptions of CRC screening and factors which contribute to beliefs about CRC in Latinos. Most studies are quantitative and rarely include a qualitative approach focusing on cultural aspects and communication with physicians. The purpose of this study was to explore participants' perceived facilitators and barriers to CRC screening, as well as perspectives on physician recommendation and fatalism, using a qualitative approach. A convenience and snowball sampling were used to collect the data. Eight English-speaking Latino individuals (M age=56 years; 75% female) in the Phoenix, Arizona area were invited to 60-90 minute in-depth interviews on perceptions of the colorectal cancer screening process. Ten major themes emerged from the interviews: (1) lacking awareness and knowledge of CRC screening, (2) attitude toward CRC and screening, (3) availability of preventive care, (4) physician trust, (5) fear, (6) desire for increased information, (7) personal learning, (8) lifestyle factors, (9) cultural impact, and (10) willingness to change lifestyle. Results indicated varying levels of perceived knowledge of colorectal cancer, little perceived risk of diagnosis, desire for more information, and a high level of physician trust. Implications for nursing included increased need for CRC screening educational resources, as well as further investigation of the influence of fatalistic belief in CRC screening compliance for the Latino population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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The Reconceptualization of Palliative Care in Oncology Nursing: A Meta-Synthesis

Description

Often equated with hospice or end-of-life care, palliative care is the expansion of traditional disease-model medical treatments to include the goals of enhancing quality of life, facilitating patient autonomy, and

Often equated with hospice or end-of-life care, palliative care is the expansion of traditional disease-model medical treatments to include the goals of enhancing quality of life, facilitating patient autonomy, and addressing physical or emotional suffering. This interdisciplinary model is essential throughout the cancer continuum and offers the best patient outcomes when initiated at the time of diagnosis. While extensive research exists on the purpose and benefits of palliative care, substantial barriers to early and effective implementation remain. This study aims to examine and integrate current research literature on oncology nurses' perceptions of palliative care, including comparison to evidence-based preferred practice. Synthesis of qualitative findings offers transformative reconceptualization aimed to inform nursing education and improve patient care.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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My Visit to the Emergency Room!

Description

The purpose of this project is to create an educational activity book for Spanish-speaking children that face a language barrier when seeking care in the Emergency Room. In order to

The purpose of this project is to create an educational activity book for Spanish-speaking children that face a language barrier when seeking care in the Emergency Room. In order to effectively develop relationships and provide exceptional healthcare for clients, nurses must understand how to effectively communicate (Escarce & Kapur, 2006). Current research reports that clients with Spanish as their primary language were more likely to have a poor experience when seeking health care assistance (Hispanic Health Disparities and Communication Barriers, 2016). Additionally, they were more likely not to seek care at all due to little or no communication capabilities with healthcare staff (Hispanic Health Disparities and Communication Barriers, 2016). The language barrier present and the lack of resources available to address the issue have created a disparity in the quality of healthcare for Spanish-speaking clients (Juckett, 2013). The book was made with the intention of being distributed to Spanish-speaking children and/or children with Spanish-speaking guardians, upon arrival to the Emergency Department. This educational activity book is to be used by the child, their guardians, and their involved health care staff to more comfortably navigate their way through the Emergency Room process.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

My Sister's Monster: A Story of Hardship and Healing

Description

At least 30 million people in the United States suffer from an eating disorder during their lifetime (National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, 2016). The Centers for Disease

At least 30 million people in the United States suffer from an eating disorder during their lifetime (National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, 2016). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines anorexia nervosa as a disorder where the person strives to maintain a lower than normal body weight through restriction and starvation (CDC MMWR, 1996). People with this disorder constantly have to control and count everything they eat (Mayo Clinic, 2016). For my creative project, I documented my sister's struggles through Digital Storytelling. My hope was to use my creative project to help others who are also struggling with anorexia nervosa. The goal is to provide advice and encouragement based on my family's experiences as well as my sister's accounts of her time in a rehabilitation center. Some of the things that helped my sister through her recovery were patience, support and communication from family and loved ones, caring for animals, and practices with positive self- talk.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Multimedia Approach in Asthma Medication Education

Description

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education comic book. Of the two creations, the asthma-education video was used in a former Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) student’s study to supplement a session at a clinic with an asthma educator. The tools included in the study, the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014) and the Asthma Control TestTM (ACTTM; QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), were completed by the participants prior to and after the implementation of the session that incorporated the video. The results suggested that the video had an effect on asthma control as measured by the ACTTM (QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), but not on daily preventative asthma inhaler usage as measured by the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014). The comic book has not been evaluated yet. Both multimedia education tools—the comic book and the video—were created as a requirement for the Barrett thesis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Christian Beliefs Surrounding End of Life Care

Description

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This study sought to investigate Christian end of life beliefs and needs. A qualitative study design was used to explore end of life beliefs and needs of members from a non-denominational Christian church who self-declared their Christianity. A 10-item Assessment Tool on end of life needs and beliefs was created by this investigator and used in the study (Appendix 1). A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Notes and audio recordings were taken and later transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis including an open analysis and an axial analysis of the data. The open analysis identified trends and common concepts which were then categorized into broader themes during the axial analysis. Findings included several major themes that described the Christian population's end of life needs and beliefs. The major themes identified included: trust in God, beliefs about necessity of religious practices, lack of fear of death, similarities in religious rituals and practices, and a desire for quality of life. During a statistical analysis, findings revealed that 86% believed that pain and suffering should be treated and prevented. One hundred percent (100%) of the participants reported that their faith helped with their acceptance of death. An additional 64% stated that they did not fear death. The findings in this study can improve religious and cultural awareness for nurses and others in the healthcare field.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05