Matching Items (19)

The Freshmen 15

Description

We faced many struggles of starting college together, one of which, being the difficulty of mealtime once you are officially on your own. To the two of us and many of our friends, it was difficult no longer having a

We faced many struggles of starting college together, one of which, being the difficulty of mealtime once you are officially on your own. To the two of us and many of our friends, it was difficult no longer having a meal that felt like it turned a house to a home. Our goal of this project was to help those who may be experiencing similar feelings.

For our Thesis Project we wanted to create a cookbook that was designed specifically for college students who are living in the dorms. Our cookbook includes recipes that are low cost and easy to make for beginners. To be sure to capture our target audience, our cookbook will only included recipes which can be created using the given appliances in most standard dorms, which are limited to a microwave, blender, refrigerator and small freezer.

For the recipes specifically, we used a lot of family recipes and recipes from peers and colleagues. A great deal of time was spent actually testing out the potential recipes so we could narrow down which would be best for our book.

As two seniors who have grown immensely over the past few years at Arizona State, we recognize the issues that students may face when moving into a dorm. It was our goal to use our own experience and knowledge combined with research of those people who have also gone through this process, to create a book that we feel would have tremendously helped us navigate through our freshman year of college.

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2019-05

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Increasing Health and Fitness Literacy in Underserved Communities to Prevent Childhood Obesity in Children Ages 8-14

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One of the great difficulties in leading America to become a healthier nation involves overcoming the socioeconomic disparity that exists between income and health literacy. Impoverished communities consistently lack the proper health education to make quality food purchases and healthy

One of the great difficulties in leading America to become a healthier nation involves overcoming the socioeconomic disparity that exists between income and health literacy. Impoverished communities consistently lack the proper health education to make quality food purchases and healthy lifestyle choices, leading to higher rates of obesity. Through FitPHX Energy Zones, an after-school program designed to encourage Phoenix youths to lead healthier lifestyles through an innovative use of library spaces, I provided health education and opportunities for physical activity for 8 to 14-year-olds in underserved Phoenix communities. However, although this intervention made significant progress with the kids' health literacy development over the course of the program, it is difficult for community-based intervention programs to continue in the long run due to budget or other extraneous circumstances. Once the program ends, there needed to be a way to continue to reach the kids beyond the scope of the program such that they can continue to experience the lessons taught during the program. Following the conclusion of FitPHX, I created an interactive book for the kids I worked with to help them retain the health and nutrition knowledge taught during the program.

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2018-05

Lessons Learned from the Halle Heart Museum: A Content Analysis of Student Letters

Description

The purpose of this study was to gain greater insight on the educational growth and experience of children who visit the Halle Heart Children's Museum, by analyzing and exploring student thank you letters received from 2011-2016. Of the major contributors

The purpose of this study was to gain greater insight on the educational growth and experience of children who visit the Halle Heart Children's Museum, by analyzing and exploring student thank you letters received from 2011-2016. Of the major contributors of cardiovascular disease taught in the museum, nutrition was discussed about most in the letters (42.6%). Children are able to learn about health related topics in museums, as evidenced by recall of topics and facts in student letters. Museums can be an influential and education experience for children, especially museums teaching about health related topics.

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2017-12

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Comparison of Nutrition Resources Available to Non-Athlete Students at Pac-12 Schools

Description

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at each university within the Pacific-12 conference will help determine which schools are best able to support their students' needs. Data was collected using a Google forms survey sent via email to wellness directors of each of the universities in the Pac-12 conference. Eight out of the twelve schools in the conference responded to the survey. The average number of dietitians available to all students (regardless of athlete status) was found to be 1.43 dietitians. Of the schools that responded, the University of Colorado, Boulder, has the most resources dedicated to student nutrition wellness with three dietitians available for all undergraduate students, free dietitian services, and approximately 150 wellness events each year. The success of available nutrition wellness resources was inconclusive as schools did not provide the information regarding student utilization and attendance. Future university promoted nutrition wellness programs should increase the number of affordable dietitians and total wellness events, as well as promote student health services through social media platforms to improve student nutrition knowledge and usage of resources.

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2018-05

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Trying to Keep Up: Energy Drink and Coffee Consumption, Student Involvement, and Sleep Among Diverse College Freshmen

Description

Background While extensive research has been conducted among college students consuming alcohol with energy drinks, there is limited research exploring how extracurricular activities could have an impact on energy drink consumption and sleep. Understanding the association between student involvement and

Background While extensive research has been conducted among college students consuming alcohol with energy drinks, there is limited research exploring how extracurricular activities could have an impact on energy drink consumption and sleep. Understanding the association between student involvement and the impact it could have on sleep and energy drink consumption among college freshmen is essential in promoting healthy behaviors while in college. Objectives The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between student involvement, average hours of sleep, and predicted prevalence of energy drink and coffee consumption amongst college freshmen living in residence halls at a large, public university in the Southwest. Student involvement and fewer hours of sleep hypothesized to observe higher energy drink consumption. Methods This study was a secondary data analysis of the second wave of the longitudinal SPARC (Social impact of Physical Activity and nutRition in College) study assessing college freshmen (n=599; 70.6% female; 50.9% non-white) living on campus. Students were enrolled in this study during the 2015\u20142016 school year. Mutually adjusted generalized estimating equation (GEE) binomial models examined the relationship between involvement (academic clubs, sport clubs, honors, taking 16 or more credit hours, and having a job) and sleep with energy drink and coffee consumption, controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, Pell grant status, ever having tried alcohol, and clustering of students in residence halls. Results On average, students were enrolled in 15 credits, slept an average 8 hours per night, those who had a job worked 14 hours for pay per week, 35% reported consuming energy drinks in the past week, and about 29% of students reported coffee consumption. Males showed a higher predicted prevalence of energy drink consumption compared to females (p<0.001), where females showed a higher predicted prevalence of coffee consumption compared to males (<0.001); energy drink consumption was less prevalent amongst Hispanic students compared to white students (p=0.018), but more prevalent amongst black students compared to white students (p=0.002); no associations between race were found in predicted prevalence of coffee consumption. Average hours of sleep per night was inversely associated with energy drink consumption predicted prevalence (p<0.001). There was a lower predicted prevalence of energy drink and coffee consumption in honors student status (p<0.001) compared to non-honors students. Students taking 16 or more class credit hours showed a higher predicted prevalence in both energy drink (p=0.050) and coffee consumption (p=0.023) compared to students taking less than 16 class credit hours. Students involved in physically active clubs showed a greater predicted prevalence of coffee consumption (p<0.001) compared to students not in physically active clubs. There was no difference in the predicted prevalence in energy drink consumption amongst students involved in physically active clubs (p=0.710), non-physically active clubs (p=0.493), and having a job (p=0.146). Coffee consumption predicted prevalence showed no significant prevalence amongst students of different race and ethnicity [Black (p=0.507), Hispanic (p=103), Other (p=116)] as well as students involved in non-physically active (p=0.839) clubs and who had a paid job (p=0.088). Conclusion Associations observed between average hours of sleep, the different types of involvement of student activities, and energy drink and coffee consumption, were interesting in that a few findings were found to be contrary to the hypotheses. Future research should delve deeper into student involvement within honors programs to understand the contextual factors of why these students showed a significant inverse association in energy drink consumption. Contrary to hypothesis, sleep and energy drink consumption prevalence were indirectly related leading future research to examine and understand why students are consuming energy drinks since on average participants were meeting recommended sleep guidelines. Nutrition interventions are needed for the groups at consuming energy drinks and alcohol in combination due to the study finding increased predicted prevalence amongst these groups as well as the increased risky health behavior associated with the combination found in the literature. Support or Funding Information This study was supported by the NIH Common Fund from the Office of the Director and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, grant number 1DP5OD017910-01 (PI: M. Bruening). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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2018-05

ASU Student Attitudes and Beliefs of the Vegan Diet

Description

People have become increasingly perceptive in their health and well being. As a result, people are directing their attention to unconventional diet choices. A number of individuals are turning to a veganism. In 2017, six percent of Americans identified as

People have become increasingly perceptive in their health and well being. As a result, people are directing their attention to unconventional diet choices. A number of individuals are turning to a veganism. In 2017, six percent of Americans identified as vegan, up from only one percent in 2014. A vegan diet has been scientifically shown to have many health benefits when compared to the average western diet, which is typically inadequate in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and contains excessive amounts of processed foods, alcohol, salt, red meat, and sugar. With its gain in popularity, and more people adopting the diet, comes a lot of controversies. There are many who support and advocate for it, including a number of celebrities, and health organizations like the American Diabetes Association and USDA. However, many people remain skeptical about its purpose and proposed benefits. There is a general lack of knowledge when it comes to veganism. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and beliefs held by college students at Arizona State University about a vegan diet. A survey was prepared and later distributed to students of different majors across Arizona State University. A total of 100 students completed the survey. The results revealed that ASU students had varying beliefs in regard to a vegan diet, some accurate beliefs, and other inaccurate beliefs. In general, the vegan participants tend to be more accurate in their knowledge of a vegan diet, however, no statistical differences were found among the vegan and non-vegan (includes vegetarian, pescatarian and omnivorous) participants. Supplemental research should include a larger sample of vegan participants and should examine behavioral differences among vegans and non-vegans.

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2018-12

Polycystic ovary syndrome: How does diet play a role?

Description

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine-metabolic disorder found in 5-10% of reproductive-aged women, and is characterized by symptoms such as increased blood-sugar levels and increased androgen production, which can cause a multitude of complications, including obesity, high blood-pressure, type-2

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine-metabolic disorder found in 5-10% of reproductive-aged women, and is characterized by symptoms such as increased blood-sugar levels and increased androgen production, which can cause a multitude of complications, including obesity, high blood-pressure, type-2 diabetes, infertility, acne, hirsutism, and much more. All of this is predicted to be the outcome of genetics, excess insulin production, low-grade inflammation, and/or hyperandrogenaemia. In attempt to reduce these experienced symptoms/causes, it is suggested that women with PCOS adopt healthy and balanced diets that incorporate foods low on the glycemic index, high in fiber, and low in anti-inflammatory properties, to help reduce insulin levels and low-grade inflammation. This dietary alteration should also be coupled with other lifestyle changes such as exercise, stress-reduction techniques, and, if needed, medications such as oral contraceptive pills and/or metformin to help regulate hormones and insulin levels. While further research needs to be conducted, these dietary considerations may help to alleviate the symptoms experienced by women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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Date Created
2020-05

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Finding the 'Ideal' Nutrition Intervention

Description

High childhood obesity rates have resulted in many interventions to attempt to lower these rates. Interventions such as day camps, residential camps, therapy-based interventions and family-based interventions lead to changes in weight and self-esteem but family-based intervention leads to the

High childhood obesity rates have resulted in many interventions to attempt to lower these rates. Interventions such as day camps, residential camps, therapy-based interventions and family-based interventions lead to changes in weight and self-esteem but family-based intervention leads to the longest-term success for children ages nine to 17. Analysis of the interventions was measured using tools such as BMI, BMI-percentiles, and weight. Psychological measures such as self-esteem, happiness, and quality of life analysis was preferred, however were not measured in all studies. While most interventions resulted in weight loss and increased self-esteem, results were often not long-term. Studies provided evidence that family-based therapy has potential to last long-term, however there is a lack of research. To determine the most effective childhood nutrition intervention research must conduct follow-ups for many years after the initial intervention to ensure they provide long-term results.

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2020-05

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The Center-Level Predictors of Non CACFP and CACFP Participation in Arizona: A Cross-Sectional Study

Description

Background: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), as a federal nutrition assistance program, provides guidance and financial support to early childcare education centers (ECECs) who provide nutritious foods to children in care. Understanding factors that predict participating in

Background: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), as a federal nutrition assistance program, provides guidance and financial support to early childcare education centers (ECECs) who provide nutritious foods to children in care. Understanding factors that predict participating in CACFP is necessary to expanding CACFP reach. The purpose of this study was to assess center-level predictors of ECECs participating in CACFP in Arizona to guide state-wide recruitment efforts. Methods: This study analyzed data from ECECs in Arizona in 2020 (n=2228), sourcing data from the Arizona Department of Economic Services (Quality First rating (an Arizona-based score for quality of the ECE centers), accreditation Status, highest educational attainment, enrichment center status, and total licensed capacity), Arizona Department of Education (CACFP), Arizona Department of Health and Sanitation (SNAP-Ed participation), and the US Census. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between the predictors and participating in CACFP, adjusting for SNAP-Ed eligibility by census tract.
Results: Centers had a significantly greater odds of participating in CACFP if they were an enrichment site (OR=5.9; 95% CI: 4.6, 7.5), had a Quality First rating (OR=2.5; 95% CI: 2.0, 3.0), and when the highest educational attainment by staff was a bachelor’s degree or higher (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7).
Discussion: The findings support indicate that certain modifiable center-level factors were related to participation in CACFP. Findings may assist possible linkages with other state-level programs to improve the recruitment and retention of ECE centers to CACFP.

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Date Created
2021

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Reduction of visceral fat in response to consumption of red wine vinegar

Description

Objectives: To investigate the potential of vinegar supplementation as a means for reducing visceral fat in healthy overweight and obese adults, and to evaluate its effects on fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin.

Subjects and Methods: Forty-five sedentary overweight and

Objectives: To investigate the potential of vinegar supplementation as a means for reducing visceral fat in healthy overweight and obese adults, and to evaluate its effects on fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin.

Subjects and Methods: Forty-five sedentary overweight and obese adult participants with a waist circumference greater than 32 inches for women and 37 inches for men were randomly assigned to one of two groups, the vinegar group (VIN, n=21) or the control group (CON, n=24), and instructed to consume either two tablespoons of liquid red wine vinegar (3.6g acetic acid) or a control pill (0.0225g acetic acid) twice daily at the beginning of a meal for 8 weeks. Participants were also instructed to maintain normal diet and physical activity levels. Anthropometric measures, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, blood samples, and 24-hour dietary recalls were collected at baseline and at end of trial. A compliance calendar was provided for daily tracking of vinegar supplementation.

Results: Compliance to vinegar supplementation averaged 92.7 ±13.3% among the VIN group and 89.1 ±18.9% among the CON group. There were no statistically significant differences in anthropometric measurements between baseline and week 8: weight (P=0.694), BMI (P=0.879), and waist circumference (P=0.871). Similarly, DXA scan data did not show significant changes in visceral fat (P=0.339) or total fat (P=0.294) between baseline and week 8. The VIN group had significant reductions in fasting glucose (P=0.003), fasting insulin (P <0.001), and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance scores (P <0.001) after treatment.

Conclusions: These data do not support the findings from previous studies that indicated a link between vinegar supplementation and increased fat metabolism, specifically visceral fat reduction.

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Date Created
2019