Matching Items (5)

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Developing social capital for parents in low income urban schools

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if social capital for parents in a low-income urban school would develop through structured or unstructured parent-teacher meetings. The parent-teacher meetings were

The purpose of this study was to determine if social capital for parents in a low-income urban school would develop through structured or unstructured parent-teacher meetings. The parent-teacher meetings were developed to provide opportunities for parents and teachers to meet to build relationships and develop trust through teaching and learning how to support reading fluency and reading comprehension strategies. In order to build relationships between parents and teachers both parties need to trust one another. Trust is the foundation of relationships but before parties can trust one another, opportunities to form relationships need to be provided. In the case of parents and teachers, the study suggests that the parent-teacher meetings might be a starting point to provide opportunities to form trusting relationships. As parents and teachers work collaboratively to support the academic needs of the children, parents will increase their social capital and learn how to navigate the school system. The findings of the parent-teacher meetings showed that the perceptions of parents and teachers varied. The findings of the study did not display any noticeable differences in responses between the structured and unstructured group of participants. Parents appreciated meeting with teachers to learn how to support student learning at home and believed teachers were influential in the educational experience of their children. Teachers believed: parents want to support student learning at home, but lack academic skills; parents are the influential in the educational experience of the students; and parents are hesitant to ask school staff for help.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Professional development in the area of autism: effectiveness of collaboration in online and face-to-face learning formats

Description

Effectively educating students with autism is a necessary element in providing all students with a free and appropriate public education, and as the number of students diagnosed with an autism

Effectively educating students with autism is a necessary element in providing all students with a free and appropriate public education, and as the number of students diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder continues to increase in both public and private educational settings, providing successful and satisfactory professional development opportunities in the area of autism is becoming increasingly essential. This study explored the experiences of twenty-three educators in a suburban southwest K-12 public school district, as they participated in a fifteen-hour professional development course in an online or face-to-face format, and collaboratively problem-solved their challenges in educating students with autism. Qualitative data was collected from participants' weekly written reflections and comments from a pre- and post-survey on attitudes, to determine quality of and satisfaction with collaboration in relation to course format. Results indicated that the online format produced higher-quality collaboration when it came to presenting one's own situation(s) to the group, finding group discussions helpful, having enough time to collaborate, providing feedback/suggestions to group members, and perceiving suggestions for one's own situation as helpful (as evidenced by the number of suggestions that participants said they would likely implement). The face-to-face format produced higher-quality collaboration when it came to in-depth problem-solving regarding a situation, implementing suggestions for one's own situation, and relating course content to collaborative activities. Participants' attitudes about using technology as a means of collaboration showed little change overall from pre- to post-survey. Though slight increases in positive attitudes concerning technology were found in various areas, many participants still thought highly of a face-to-face format for collaborative purposes, even after participating in the online professional development course. Findings may be of use to educational institutions developing online or face-to-face professional development opportunities in the area of autism.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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The iPad as an Alternative Reinforcer during Functional Communication Training: Effects on Self-Injury and Aggression

Description

The present study used a multiple baseline design across settings to examine the effects of using an iPad as an alternative reinforcer on self-injury and aggression when reinforcement for appropriate

The present study used a multiple baseline design across settings to examine the effects of using an iPad as an alternative reinforcer on self-injury and aggression when reinforcement for appropriate communication was denied following Functional Communication Training in an adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID), and severe aggression. The study also assessed collateral effects of the intervention on the use of self-management to control aggression. Data indicate the use of an iPad as an alternative reinforcer decreased the duration of self-injury and physical aggression in an adolescent in a big box store, grocery store, and classroom. Instances of self-injury and aggression remained low during maintenance sessions and a six month post-hoc analysis. Collateral gains in self-management were made during treatment and maintenance sessions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Evaluation of a biofeedback intervention in college students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders

Description

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n=10) and in a typical college population (n=37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future research in the areas of biofeedback and accommodations for college students with ASD. Comparing the first five weeks of the study with the second five weeks of the 10 week study, both groups showed improvement in their control of heart rate variability, a physiological marker for anxiety used in biofeedback. The ASD group showed greater gains, more consistent gains, and less variability in raw scores than the typical group. EDA also revealed a pattern between participant attrition and a participant's biofeedback progress. Implications are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Effects of alternate format in-service delivery on teacher knowledge base and problem-solving related to autism & adaptations: what teachers need to know

Description

This study's purpose was to explore effectiveness of alternate format in-service delivery for what teachers needed to know to effectively teach their students with Autism Spectrum Disorder/High Functioning Autism/Asperger Syndrome

This study's purpose was to explore effectiveness of alternate format in-service delivery for what teachers needed to know to effectively teach their students with Autism Spectrum Disorder/High Functioning Autism/Asperger Syndrome (ASD/HFA/AS) in the general education setting. The study's research questions included: Did participants learn information they needed as well using asynchronous online in-service format models as when in a traditional face-to-face consultative approach? Did the use of a broad asynchronous online discussion approach to collaboration result in effective student problem-solving for the participants? Did participant attitudes change toward online instruction as a means of collaboration as a result of engaging in alternate in-service delivery models? A fifteen-hour staff development course was developed and taught to 24 teacher/educators in a suburban southwest K-12 public school district. The course content was organized around topics derived from an earlier data collection and included what teachers said they needed to know, from whom, and how. A free, simple asynchronous online environment was created for the course and online participation for learning and collaboration activities was requested of two participant groups, hybrid or online. Quantitative data was collected from Pre-/Post-Tests and survey. Qualitative data was collected from weekly collaborative problem-solving reflections. Results indicated that educators improved knowledge base in ASD/HFA/AS characteristics and adaptations and found collaborative online problem-solving about students effective and personally satisfactory. Results for online participants during the alternate format delivery sessions of the course were stronger than hybrid format although both appeared to profit from the use of technology. All participants changed their view to positively value asynchronous online formats for learning and collaborating with other teachers to find out what they needed to know to implement in the classroom in efficient and economical ways.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010