Matching Items (100)

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Development of a Head's Up Display (HU)

Description

Head's up displays (HUD) are now emerging into the technological market that is used in various functionalities, but most of all, they are expensive. An alternative method to find cheaper

Head's up displays (HUD) are now emerging into the technological market that is used in various functionalities, but most of all, they are expensive. An alternative method to find cheaper ways to develop a head's up display is researched and implemented. The HUD is equipped with a processor and projector. Both of these hardware components encompasses most part of the HUD along with some manipulation of the material that the image is projected on. In this study, the software and the optics of the HUD will be explored and lastly, taking into full consideration on the future work that can be done to make improvements on the HUD.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Tunneling Time in Quantum Mechanics

Description

The longstanding issue of how much time it takes a particle to tunnel through quantum barriers is discussed; in particular, the phenomenon known as the Hartman effect is reviewed. A

The longstanding issue of how much time it takes a particle to tunnel through quantum barriers is discussed; in particular, the phenomenon known as the Hartman effect is reviewed. A calculation of the dwell time for two successive rectangular barriers in the opaque limit is given and the result depends on the barrier widths and hence does not lead to superluminal tunneling or the Hartman effect.

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Date Created
  • 2009-05

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Minority carrier lifetime of lattice-matched CdZnTe alloy grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

Description

A CdZnTe/MgCdTe double-heterostructure (DH) consisting of a 3 μm thick Cd[subscript 0.9946] Zn[subscript 0.0054]Te middle layer that is lattice-matched to an InSb substrate has been grown using molecular beam epitaxy. A

A CdZnTe/MgCdTe double-heterostructure (DH) consisting of a 3 μm thick Cd[subscript 0.9946] Zn[subscript 0.0054]Te middle layer that is lattice-matched to an InSb substrate has been grown using molecular beam epitaxy. A long carrier lifetime of 3.4 × 10[superscript 2] ns has been demonstrated at room temperature, which is approximately three times as long as that of a CdTe/MgCdTe DH with identical layer thickness. This substantial improvement is due to the reduction in misfit dislocation density in the CdZnTe alloy. In contrast, a CdTe/MgCdTe DH with 3 μm thick CdTe layer grown on an InSb substrate exhibits a strain relaxation of ∼30%, which leads to a wider x-ray diffraction peak, a weaker integrated photoluminescence intensity, and a shorter minority carrier lifetime of 1.0 × 10[superscript 2] ns. These findings indicate that CdZnTe lattice-matched to InSb has great potential as applied to high-efficiency solar cells as well as virtual substrates for high-performance large-area HgCdTe focal plane arrays.

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Date Created
  • 2015-01-01

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Molecular beam epitaxial growth of high-reflectivity and broad-bandwidth ZnTe/GaSb distributed Bragg reflectors

Description

This paper reports the molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of high-reflectivity and broad-bandwidth distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) made of ZnTe/GaSb quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) layers for optoelectronic applications in the midwave

This paper reports the molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of high-reflectivity and broad-bandwidth distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) made of ZnTe/GaSb quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) layers for optoelectronic applications in the midwave infrared spectral range (2-5 mu m). A series of ZnTe/GaSb DBRs has been successfully grown on GaSb (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). During the MBE growth, a temperature ramp was applied to the initial growth of GaSb layers on ZnTe to protect the ZnTe underneath from damage due to thermal evaporation. Post-growth characterization using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy reveals smooth surface morphology, low defect density, and coherent interfaces. Reflectance spectroscopy results show that a DBR sample of seven lambda/4 pairs has a peak reflectance as high as 99.0% centered at 2.56 mu m with a bandwidth of 517 nm.

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Date Created
  • 2013-10-28