Matching Items (25)

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Reaching women in the Peruvian Andes through cervical cancer screening campaigns: assessing attitudes of stakeholders and patients

Description

Background: Peru is characterized by high cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. The country also experiences significant gaps in quality cervical cancer screening coverage for the population.
Objective: This descriptive

Background: Peru is characterized by high cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. The country also experiences significant gaps in quality cervical cancer screening coverage for the population.
Objective: This descriptive mixed methods study conducted in Cusco, Peru, aimed to assess the attitudes and perceptions of medical staff, health care workers, and patients toward a cervical cancer screening program that included both clinic-based and community outreach services conducted by a nongovernmental organization clinic (CerviCusco). The study also explored patient knowledge and attitudes around cervical cancer and about the human papillomavirus (HPV) to inform patient education efforts.
Methods: The study employed structured interviews with key informants (n=16) primarily from CerviCusco, which provides cervical cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment services, and surveys with a sample of patients (n=30) receiving services at the clinic and at screening campaigns.
Results: The majority of key informant medical staff participants felt that the general public had a very negative view of government health services. One theme running throughout the interviews was the perception that the general population lacked a culture of preventive health care and would wait until symptoms were severe before seeking treatment. Regarding services that were received by patients at CerviCusco, the participants responded that the prices were reasonable and more affordable than some private clinics. Patients attending the rural health campaigns liked that the services were free and of good quality.
Conclusion: CerviCusco has demonstrated its capacity to provide screening outreach campaigns to populations who had not previously had access to liquid-based cytology services. The finding that patients had generally low levels of knowledge about cervical cancer and the HPV vaccine prompted the development of culturally and linguistically appropriate educational and promotional materials to improve the educational component of the periodic campaigns conducted primarily in rural areas of Andean Peru.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-10-18

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Sociocultural perspectives on antibiotic consumption and resistance

Description

In 2015, the World Health Organization cited antibiotic resistance as one of the greatest current challenges to global public health. A major driver of the evolution of antibiotic resistance is

In 2015, the World Health Organization cited antibiotic resistance as one of the greatest current challenges to global public health. A major driver of the evolution of antibiotic resistance is the overuse and misuse of these drugs. While antibiotic stewardship, education campaigns, and health policy attempt to limit drug use globally, public understanding of antibiotic resistance and its consequences are lacking. The goal of this study is to analyze the social and cultural influences of antibiotic knowledge and usage behavior. Over a three-month period, I interviewed 211 laypersons in Guatemala, Spain, the Netherlands, India, South Africa, and New Zealand to understand their ideas, perceptions, and behaviors regarding antibiotics and compared results across countries. While an overall consensus across countries does exist, I found significant differences between low and high income countries as well as between low and high antibiotic consumption countries. Additionally, I found that having increased public health knowledge is related to lower antibiotic "risky" behavior. These results help contextualize national data on antibiotic consumption and resistance by illustrating relationships between access, beliefs, and consumption patterns within populations. The results also inform the development of community and culture specific educational campaigns regarding antibiotic resistance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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A critical literature review and case study of the 'draw and write' research technique

Description

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow children to participate in research in a way that is less restrictive than other techniques, many critique the method for its adverse ethical concerns, validity, and issues of interpretation and analysis. This article reviews the ‘draw and write’ research technique and its common critiques as well as offers a case study of the ‘draw and write’ technique, performed with children in Acatenango, Guatemala, in order to validate the accuracy of the ‘draw and write’ technique in depicting specific quantitative results.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Utilization and an Evaluation of Health Services Provided by the Flying Samaritans at the Laguna de San Ignacio Clinic in Baja California Sur, Mexico

Description

The Flying Samaritans is a group of volunteers who provide health care on a monthly basis at the Laguna de San Ignacio Clinic in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The purpose

The Flying Samaritans is a group of volunteers who provide health care on a monthly basis at the Laguna de San Ignacio Clinic in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to gather demographic information about the patients at the clinic as well as to determine why the patients need to use a free clinic, how they use other health care facilities that are available to them, how well they take care of themselves in terms of exercise, nutrition, and care of chronic disease, and how the Flying Samaritans can improve their care for this population. This information was gathered using an extensive patient survey as well as through interviews with both patients and health care providers at this clinic. Based on the data gathered, it was determined that some health problems present in the population could be prevented with education about daily health and dental care. The Flying Samaritans could implement some forms of patient education in order to minimize chronic health problems and to continue to improve the overall health of this population. The data also demonstrated that the patients rely heavily on the Flying Samaritans services, as the town in very isolated and does not offer any other medical or dental facilities. The Flying Samaritans are essential to the well-being of this town and provide services that the patients may not otherwise receive.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Variance in Perceptions of Suicide Within and Between Gender in Nepal

Description

Globally, suicide is the second leading cause of death, and accounts for about 800,000 deaths per year worldwide (WHO, 2013). The majority of these deaths occur in low and middle-income

Globally, suicide is the second leading cause of death, and accounts for about 800,000 deaths per year worldwide (WHO, 2013). The majority of these deaths occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), yet the research and documentation of suicide is heavily skewed to higher income countries where more systematic reporting of suicide occurs, along with a larger existing evidence base. Nepal is one LMIC where the speculated burden of suicide is high, with a predicted suicide rate of 7th highest in the world. Using both public-health and ethnographic approaches, the current study contributes to the discussion about suicide in Nepal. The primary goal of this research study is to understand the similarities and differences in perceived drivers for suicide for men and women in Nepal. Interviews conducted in Kathmandu and Jumla, Nepal were transcribed, and free lists which described drivers for suicide for men and women were extracted from the narratives. Thematic codes were then created to classify narrative responses into a cultural domain. The most salient codes listed by males and females for drivers for male/female suicide were analyzed and further contextualized using interview dialogue. Findings reveal social and relational drivers of suicide as the most salient for both genders, suggesting that suicide is not an individual act, but something that is caused by the broader, social environment. Additionally, perceptions of the reasons for suicide vary between gender. Perceived drivers for suicide for males are more often correlated with financial burden and the responsibilities tied to being the source of income and prosperity in a highly patriarchal society. Violence and inequality are perceived to be among the main drivers for female suicide. Findings contribute to the ethnographic research of suicide and the suicide literature in Nepal, and generate a better understanding of how reasons for suicide differ among males and females.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Student Knowledge Regarding Infectious Disease and Its Impact on Prevention Behavior

Description

Advancements in both the medical field and public health have substantially minimized the detrimental impact of infectious diseases. Health education and disease prevention remains a vital tool to maintain and

Advancements in both the medical field and public health have substantially minimized the detrimental impact of infectious diseases. Health education and disease prevention remains a vital tool to maintain and propagate this success. In order to determine the relationship between knowledge of disease and reported preventative behavior 180 participants amongst the ASU student population were surveyed about their knowledge and prevention behavior for 10 infectious diseases. Of the 180 participants only 138 were completed surveys and used for analysis. No correlation was found between knowledge or perceived risk and preventative measures within the total sample of 138 respondents, however there was a correlation found within Lyme disease and Giardia exposure to information and prevention. Additionally, a cultural consensus analysis was used to compare the data of 17 US-born and 17 foreign-born participants to analyze patterns of variation and agreement on disease education based on national origins. Cultural consensus analysis showed a strong model of agreement among all participants as well as within the US-born and foreign-born student groups. There was a model of agreement within the questions pertaining to transmission and symptoms. There was not however a model of agreement within treatment questions. The findings suggest that accurate knowledge on infectious diseases may be less impactful on preventative behavior than social expectations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Utilization of Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants of Senor de los Milagros of Trujillo, Peru to Identify Barriers to Care

Description

The purpose of this study is to analyze what barriers of care exist within the Senor de los Milagros community in Trujillo, Peru and how these barriers to care can

The purpose of this study is to analyze what barriers of care exist within the Senor de los Milagros community in Trujillo, Peru and how these barriers to care can identify shortcomings in the public healthcare system. This study is a collaboration of field research and outside literature. The research conducted was done via structured interviews with 15 participants, all promotoras (mothers of the community) and their husbands in the Senor de los Milagros community of Trujillo, Peru. Summaries and quotes from these interviews were uploaded and quantified to identify common barriers to care derived from socioeconomic and cultural determinants . Although this was on the main focus of the study, observations and conversations with healthcare staff and patients showed that the two most specific barriers found when data was analyzed were the wait times of public sector facilities and quality of care within these facilities. These barriers to care did not stop the promotoras from seeking care at MINSA facilities, but it does pose the questions as to how it affects healthcare-seeking behaviors and if this affects long-term healthcare outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Traditional Healing and Pubilc Health Integration: Utilizing Cultural Strengths to Provide Targeted HIV Interventions

Description

Curanderos are Hispanic traditional healers who attend to their clients through spiritual, natural, and physical techniques. Recent studies have shown that a subset of the Hispanic population refer to these

Curanderos are Hispanic traditional healers who attend to their clients through spiritual, natural, and physical techniques. Recent studies have shown that a subset of the Hispanic population refer to these healers for HIV and STD treatment and believe they are important in a collaborative targeted HIV intervention. Thus, curanderos were interviewed and the lay population of Phoenix was sampled in order to get a better idea of the utility of these healers in an HIV prevention effort targeted at the Hispanic community. Due to the limitations of this study there was not sufficient enough data to make significant conclusions; however the interviews with the curanderos were surprising in the they had significant roles as healers in the Phoenix area, patients have referred to them for HIV and STD treatment, and a couple of the healers have integrated western medical knowledge into their practice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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PUERTO RICAN TRADITIONAL FOLK MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION IN A PUERTO RICAN CLINICAL SETTING

Description

Over the past three decades, medical anthropology research, published within both public health and anthropological journals, demonstrates both the prevalence of traditional folk medicine in Latino populations in the United

Over the past three decades, medical anthropology research, published within both public health and anthropological journals, demonstrates both the prevalence of traditional folk medicine in Latino populations in the United States and the potential difficulty of negotiating these beliefs and practices with clinical, western biomedicine. I bring attention to what might be a narrative of divergent values that occurs in Latino communities in the United States. A well-documented source (Pachter, 1994) of this clash is the culturally pervasive use of folk medicine in Latino layperson populations seeking biomedical care in the Unites States (U.S.). Numerous studies (Padilla, 2001; Koss 1972) suggest that a significant portion of Latinos in the continental United States call upon folk knowledge to diagnose, reinterpret, and treat illness. The Puerto Rican population seems to be no exception, though few studies are specific to native-born Puerto Ricans living in Puerto Rico, where the issue of access to quality public health care becomes increasingly problematic. In this honors undergraduate thesis project, I conduct a review of the literature that bridges anthropology and public health research and proceed to describe a study I conducted on Culebra Island, Puerto Rico in May of 2015. The study aims to determine whether patient satisfaction can be linked to being treated by a physician hailing from a similar cultural background, or if an irredeemable disparity between patient and provider present a roadblock to health outcomes. I found that the Puerto Rican physicians are receptive to folk illness (symptoms) and consider folk therapy as part of the treatment regimen. The physicians make patients feel understood, which might improve treatment adherence and thus health outcomes. Still, respondents demonstrated that there is high patient trust in the biomedical model by emphasizing the use of conventional medications in tandem with the folk therapy. Nevertheless, the health care provider's disposition in regards to folk knowledge and modalities are important but does not present a roadblock to optimal care and health outcomes as much as access, available services or clinic resources.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Midwifery around the World: A Study in the Role of Midwives in Local Communities and Healthcare Systems

Description

2015 marks the deadline for the UN Millennium Development Goal 5 to reduce global maternal mortality rate (MMR) by 75% since 1990. As of 2015, MMR has only been reduced

2015 marks the deadline for the UN Millennium Development Goal 5 to reduce global maternal mortality rate (MMR) by 75% since 1990. As of 2015, MMR has only been reduced by 45%. Many international organizations claim that more medically trained midwives can meet global maternal health care needs. This study investigates two major questions. What is the role of midwives in diverse international maternal healthcare contexts? How do midwives in these different contexts define their roles and the barriers to providing the best care for women? From May to August 2015, I conducted over 70 interviews with midwives in Netherlands, Sweden, Rwanda, Bangladesh, Australia and Guatemala, interviewing between 6 and 13 midwives from each country. The majority of midwives defined their roles as supporting women's individual capacities and power through normal birth, and knowing when to refer when high-risk complications arise. Although thematic barriers vary by country, midwives in all countries believed that maternal healthcare can be improved by increased collaboration between midwives and other health care professionals, better access to culturally appropriate services, and greater public awareness of the role of midwives.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05