Matching Items (16)

Impacts of COVID-19 on Food Security in Arizona

Description

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected employment and food security globally and in the United States. To understand the impacts of COVID-19 on food security in Arizona, a representative survey

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected employment and food security globally and in the United States. To understand the impacts of COVID-19 on food security in Arizona, a representative survey of Arizona households was launched online from July 1 to August 10, 2020. This brief provides an overview of changes in food security rate, perceived worries and challenges about food security, as well as behavioral changes and strategies adopted since the pandemic. Additional briefs from the Arizona survey covering topics on economic consequences, food access, and participations in food assistance programs during the pandemic are also available.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-11

Food Assistance Program Participation among Arizona Households during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Description

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic led to disruptions in the food supply and high rates of unemployment and under-employment, both in Arizona and nationally. These emergencies required food assistance programs to adapt

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic led to disruptions in the food supply and high rates of unemployment and under-employment, both in Arizona and nationally. These emergencies required food assistance programs to adapt quickly and in unprecedented ways by relaxing eligibility criteria, improvising on delivery modalities, and increasing benefits. To examine food assistance program participation during the pandemic, we collected data from a representative sample of 620 Arizona households. The sample was drawn from across Arizona in July-August 2020 using an online survey. This brief provides the summary for participation in key food assistance programs, namely, the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Special Supplemental Program for Women Infants and Children (WIC), School Food Programs, and the emergency food assistance provided through food pantries.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-11

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Job Disruptions During the First Four Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their Impacts on Food Security in Arizona

Description

With more than 19 million confirmed COVID-19 cases across the United States1 and over 500,000 in Arizona as of December 2020, the ongoing pandemic has had devastating impacts on local, national,

With more than 19 million confirmed COVID-19 cases across the United States1 and over 500,000 in Arizona as of December 2020, the ongoing pandemic has had devastating impacts on local, national, and global economies. Prior to the pandemic (February 2020), based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the unemployment rate in Arizona was 6.5%, compared to 4.9% at the national level.3 Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020), the United States has experienced striking increases in the unemployment rate, reaching 13.2% in April. Similarly, in Arizona, the unemployment rate jumped to over 13.5% in April. The unemployment rates have since declined both nationally and in Arizona but remain higher compared to February 2020. In November 2020 (the most recent data available), the national unemployment rate was 6.7%, while in Arizona the rate was 7.8%—the 10th highest unemployment rate among all U.S. states.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

Food Assistance Program Participation among US Household during COVID-19 Pandemic

Food Assistance Program Participation among US Households during COVID-19 Pandemic

Description

In the face of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, food assistance programs adapted quickly and in unprecedented ways to meet the challenges of high unemployment, disruptions in the food supply, and

In the face of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, food assistance programs adapted quickly and in unprecedented ways to meet the challenges of high unemployment, disruptions in the food supply, and school closures. Supported by US Department of Agriculture’s COVID-19 program-specific waivers, some programs relaxed their eligibility criteria, while others improvised on delivery modalities or temporarily increased benefits.1 To examine food assistance program participation and participant experiences during the first few months of the pandemic, we collected online survey data in July 2020 from a sample of over 1,500 U.S. households, representative of the US population. This brief summarizes participation in key food assistance programs, namely, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Special Supplemental Program for Women Infants and Children (WIC), School Food Programs, as well as emergency food assistance provided through Food Pantries

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-11

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COVID-19 Pandemic One Year Later: Food Insecurity and Assistance in Arizona

Description

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 and the resulting closures of schools, businesses, and restaurants led to a massive economic disruption in Arizona. The unemployment rate at

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 and the resulting closures of schools, businesses, and restaurants led to a massive economic disruption in Arizona. The unemployment rate at its peak reached 14.2% (April 2020) - a level even higher than during the great recession of 2008. High unemployment rates, coupled with a breakdown of local and national food supply chains, led to a remarkable increase in food insecurity rates among Arizona households. More than a year later, as vaccines became widely available and restrictions were lifted, schools and business began to reopen, and most activities slowly returned to pre-pandemic standards. The effects of the pandemic on food insecurity and food-related behaviors, however, might have long-lasting effects. This brief describes levels of food insecurity, food assistance program participation, job disruption, and food related behaviors among 814 households in Arizona, in the 12 months preceding the pandemic (March 2019 – March 2020) and approximately one year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic ( January 2021 –April 2021). Data collection took place between April and May 2021.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-08

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Food Based Strategies Against Alzheimer's Disease

Description

The purpose of this project is to present and consolidate current research on various nutrients and diet patterns and assess their role on the development of Alzheimer's Disease. I will

The purpose of this project is to present and consolidate current research on various nutrients and diet patterns and assess their role on the development of Alzheimer's Disease. I will begin with an explanation of Alzheimer's Disease that includes general health related information and the statistical prevalence of the disease. Following the informational overview, I will be presenting the most current research and summarizing the findings for seven single nutrients and five dietary patterns. Following the assessment will be an expository segment discussing epigenetics nutrigenomics and how this process works with different nutrients and diet patterns to impact the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's Disease from a genetic perspective. Based on the research found in the single nutrients segment, the dietary pattern segment, and the epigenetics nutrigenomics segment, I will conclude with a holistic diet plan that is the most preventative against Alzheimer's Disease.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Signature Dish: The Art of Cooking and the Science of Eating Well in the Age of Social Media

Description

For this creative project, the student's overarching objective was to establish a signature dish and to learn how to cook. She acquired a cookbook fit for novice cooks, "Eat What

For this creative project, the student's overarching objective was to establish a signature dish and to learn how to cook. She acquired a cookbook fit for novice cooks, "Eat What You Love" by Marlene Koch, which focused on healthy eating through the reduction of sugar and fat. The student completed thirty recipes including two appetizers, five breakfast entrees, five lunch entrees, twelve dinner entrees, and six desserts. Her culinary ventures were then detailed through a blog site the student had created. Blog posts included a brief description primarily of the portion size, a nutritional analysis of the recipe, enjoyable aspects of the dish, whether something went wrong, what was learned from creating the dish, as well as a photograph of the prepared dish. A large element of this project focused upon food photography and obtaining images that made the created dish look appealing. It was found that the best images were taken in natural lighting with good compositions and pops of color. In order to gain readership, the student developed an Instagram account where she would post images of the food and provide links to her blog entries and recipes. Through this means, she was able to obtain over 100 followers to her blog. In addition to learning how to cook, the student sought out to understand components of a healthy diet and how each nutrient contributes to an individual health. This objective is detailed throughout the course of the paper as well as several other objectives. The student also studied how social media has impacted the way in which we share food and our knowledge of food. Additionally in this paper, the student evaluated the evolution of the USDA Dietary Guidelines and their effectiveness over time. From this project, the student walked away with new knowledge about nutritional eating and lifestyle habits that she will retain for years to come. She hopes that this project will encourage other students to take on their own culinary adventure.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Eat In, Not Out: A Comparative Analysis Between at Home Cooking and Restaurant Dining

Description

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this information with our peers to potentially influence them to make a healthy lifestyle change. The first step was to determine the factors that influence college-aged students eating habits, and was presented with a review of relevant literature in several topics. We researched food literacy in young adults, the impact of fast food, social media's role in healthy eating habits, health behavior change in young adults, and the benefits of home cooking to obtain a general baseline of the knowledge of college-aged students. The initial research was utilized to write more effective blog posts that appropriately addressed our targeted demographic and to determine what platforms would be most appropriate to convey our information. These ideas were taken and then translated into a blog and Instagram account that contained healthy, copycat recipes of popular restaurant meals. We wrote 30 blog posts which were made up of 20 original recipes, 8 nutrition informational posts, and an introduction/conclusion. Finally, a focus group was hosted to ascertain the opinions of our peers, and to determine if they would be willing to make a lifestyle change in the form of cooking more frequently as opposed to eating out regularly. We provided them with a pre and post survey to gather their opinions before and after reviewing the findings of our research and project. We concluded that if given the information in an accessible way, college students are willing to eat in, not out.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Engaging Parents to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Hispanic Preschool Children: Parent Perception of Newsletters in the Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE) Intervention

Description

Hispanic youth have the highest risk for obesity, making this population a key priority for early childhood interventions to prevent the development of adult obesity and its consequences. Involving parents

Hispanic youth have the highest risk for obesity, making this population a key priority for early childhood interventions to prevent the development of adult obesity and its consequences. Involving parents in these interventions is essential to support positive long-term physical activity and nutrition habits. Interventions in the past have engaged parents by providing information about nutrition and fruit and vegetable intake through written materials or text such as newsletters and text messages. The Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE) intervention used gardening and interactive activities to teach preschool children ages 3-5 about healthy eating and physical activity. It aimed to increase physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children as well as improve related parenting practices. The intervention utilized newsletters to engage parents by promoting opportunities to increase physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake for their children at home. The newsletters also encouraged parents to discuss what was learned during the SAGE lessons with their children. The purpose of this paper is to describe the content of the newsletters and determine the parent perception of the newsletters through parent survey responses. This can help inform future childhood obesity interventions and parent engagement.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Grocery Store Promotion of Fruits and Vegetables: Are there Disparities by Neighborhood Demographics?

Description

Introduction: In-store promotion of food products leads to more frequent purchases. Product promotion can vary by store characteristics. We compared marketing strategies used by grocery stores to promote fruit and

Introduction: In-store promotion of food products leads to more frequent purchases. Product promotion can vary by store characteristics. We compared marketing strategies used by grocery stores to promote fruit and vegetables (FV) in neighborhoods with varying socio-economic and racial/ethnic characteristics.<br/><br/>Methods: Data was collected from a random sample of 12 large grocery stores from the same national chain located within a 15-mile radius of Downtown Phoenix. Store zip-code level median household income was used to classify stores as located in lower (<$50,000) or higher (>$50,000) income areas. Stores located in neighborhoods with more than 50% Hispanic population were classified as majority Hispanic serving. The ProPromo tool was adapted to document the presence and promotion of FV at 8 distinct locations throughout each store. Types of promotion strategies documented included displays, price promotions, size, or themes.<br/><br/>Results: FV were present at the entrance, islands, checkouts, and produce section; while fruits were promoted in all of these locations, vegetables were promotion in fewer locations. All stores used size and price promotion to promote FV; display was used to promote vegetables in 2 stores and fruits in all stores. On average stores promoted 32 fruits and 38 vegetables. Stores serving higher and lower income areas promoted similar numbers of FV. However, stores in Hispanic majority neighborhoods promoted fewer FV (66) in comparison to those in Hispanic minority areas (73).<br/><br/>Conclusion: Fruit and vegetable promotion disparity associated with neighborhood demographics may contribute to disparities in fruit and vegetable consumption.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05