Matching Items (10)

Look Up LP

Description

"Look Up" is a full length hip hop concept album that follows a day in the life of protagonist Ozy Mandias, except with a science fiction twist. He has been

"Look Up" is a full length hip hop concept album that follows a day in the life of protagonist Ozy Mandias, except with a science fiction twist. He has been abducted by an alien who is going through his memories. The project includes a full length script and lyric companion as well as a package mood visuals to go along with the album.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Background Music: Cultivating Identity and Meaning through Music

Description

The attainment of a meaningful existence is a one of the most fundamental human desires. While the pursuit for a meaningful existence is universal, the path to achieving it looks

The attainment of a meaningful existence is a one of the most fundamental human desires. While the pursuit for a meaningful existence is universal, the path to achieving it looks different for all people. An important aspect in achieving a meaningful existence is personal enlightenment that is attained through not only a profound understanding of one's own identity through reflection but also an awareness of the environment that has shaped that identity. The purpose of reflection should not be to attach blame or find excuses for the aspects of one's life that are unfavorable or shameful; rather, it should be to achieve the sense of inner peace that is integral in making informed and rational progress towards realizing aspects of an individual's life that bring meaning and happiness. The purpose of the following two sections is to demonstrate how an understanding of group-specific challenges regarding identity and upbringing may help those that identify with Chinese American or immigrant culture in their pursuit of a meaningful and satisfying existence. The first section provides a profile on some of the common issues facing Asian Americans, particularly how an immigrant approach to parenting can affect the degree of acculturation, mental health, and identity of immigrant children. The second section provides a personal backdrop to some of the themes discussed in the first section through an autoethnographic account from a Chinese American student. The purpose of the autoethnographic account is to demonstrate that leisure activities, such as music, can address issues regarding acculturation and identity that Asian Americans commonly face.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Marching Madness: A Comparative Study of Instructional Practices in the Marching Arts

Description

The activities of drum corps and high school marching band are similar in many ways, and yet drum corps is styled as the "major league" of the marching arts. What

The activities of drum corps and high school marching band are similar in many ways, and yet drum corps is styled as the "major league" of the marching arts. What makes the learning environment different between drum corps and high school marching band? While drum corps has a denser rehearsal schedule, and involved an audition process where high school marching band does not, the biggest difference between the two activities lies in the instructional practices utilized. Drum corps does not have to adhere to state or national arts education standards, and so the instructors must create their own standards and forms of assessment for the students, which directly affects student motivation. This student motivation can be understood through the Self-Determination Theory pioneered by Deci & Ryan, in which the conditions of autonomy, competency, and relatedness must be supported for students to reach the highest levels of motivation. By interviewing the directors of the Academy Drum and Bugle Corps, and the Casa Grande Union High School marching band, and surveying students of each organization, a comparison can be made in the instructional practices of each organization and the subsequent effect on student motivation. Through the interviews with the directors, it was gathered that instructors in drum corps had more chances to work with the students one on one, and assess their personal growth in a subjective manner than the instructors in the high school marching band. This affected the way in which the drum corps instructors structured their rehearsals and set their goals. High school instructors were able to assess technical skill more often with graded assessments such as playing tests or scale checks, though this did not always take into account the students' personal growth or experience. From the anonymous surveys of the students of both organizations, a desire for relatedness was communicated from the high school students more than the drum corps students, and a greater lack of comfort with asking questions was displayed from the high school students. Interpreting these results with SDT, it could be said that these high school students were feeling less motivated than the drum corps students due to a lack of fulfillment in the areas of relatedness and competence. In the end, it would seem that the differentiated instruction that is possible in drum corps sets the activity apart from high school marching band, as the instructors are able to work with students on setting personal goals and may subjectively assess their growth within the activity. Self- and peer-evaluation in drum corps is also facilitated through video assignments in which other students may give comments to their peers, which builds the area of relatedness more within drum corps students than in high school students.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Leading Tone Project

Description

The idea that everything occurs linearly, over the course of time, is evident in the way we construct our sentences and track our understanding of our own lives. It is

The idea that everything occurs linearly, over the course of time, is evident in the way we construct our sentences and track our understanding of our own lives. It is within this understanding we perform, compose, and listen to music. Since language occurs over time, there is the understanding that words and ideas are uttered like marks on a continuous line, some closer together, others with large gaps in-between. It has been the work of linguists and philosophers to understand the patterns, or the rhythm, of speech and language in this way, and while there is no definitive or consistent model for how language is rhythmically produced in any language, it has been determined that rhythm is considered and perceived when language is spoken or heard. It is this perception of rhythm in speech that defines how language comprehension is acquired before phonetic skills. This paper will explore the effects of rhythm in language during infant's prelexical period, the correlations of rhythm and developing reading skills, and finally, explore how the intervals between vocalic utterances become normalized and consistent in poetic readings.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Exploring Earworms: An Analysis of Tendencies Observed From a Diary Study of Stuck Song Syndrome Amongst a Sample of University Students

Description

This study tracks specific earworm tendencies amongst a sample of university students in an effort to support previous theories and to offer fresh perspectives about what causes earworms and why

This study tracks specific earworm tendencies amongst a sample of university students in an effort to support previous theories and to offer fresh perspectives about what causes earworms and why some people may experience more earworms than others. Every participant was placed in one of four categories: Female Music Major (FMM), Female, Non-Music Major (FNM), Male Music Major (MMM), and Male, Non-Music Major (MNN). This study determined that females experienced more earworms than males, and music majors experienced less earworms than other majors. The study also found that most earworms occurred while participants were in an environment that they did not find particularly engaging, ranging from doing homework to commuting on the bus. Data collected from this research provides potential platforms for future research in the topic of a deep analysis of earworm tendencies amongst a wider population.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Relationships Between Musical Preferences of College-Age People and Level of Musical Education/Other Biographical Factors

Description

This project examines the relationship between individuals' musical preferences and the amount of musical education they have received, as well as some other supporting variables. Data was collected from 43

This project examines the relationship between individuals' musical preferences and the amount of musical education they have received, as well as some other supporting variables. Data was collected from 43 participants regarding general and musical background information. Participants then listened to eight musical samples and answered a series of related questions. These sets of data were compared to investigate how musical preference varies with changes in background information, principally the level of musical education received. Musical preference was gauged in part according to a system which relied more on discrete musical features than common genre categorizations. The population studied was made up of honors students from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. The research questions addressed are: is musical preference dependent on level of musical education; if so, how; and what are some possible explanations for any relationships? This study was conducted in order to obtain a clearer understanding of the nature of musical preference which may be of use to musicologists and modern musicians alike. Results indicated that musical education does have an effect on musical preferences and listening habits, but that this effect is not correlated in any straightforward relationship, and there are likely more diverse issues at play.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The musical life of Billy Cioffi: a narrative inquiry

Description

The purpose of this study is to raise questions by exploring, writing, imagining, and telling the musical life stories of Billy Cioffi. Billy Cioffi is a professional musician, band leader,

The purpose of this study is to raise questions by exploring, writing, imagining, and telling the musical life stories of Billy Cioffi. Billy Cioffi is a professional musician, band leader, private teacher, professor of English, and, formerly, a musical director for acts such as Chuck Berry, Del Shannon, and others. In this document I explore the life of Billy Cioffi with the following questions in mind: 1. What might Billy's musical experiences, expertise, teaching, and learning teach us about music education? 2. What might the story of Billy’s musical life cause us to question about institutional music education? 3. How might his story trouble beliefs and perceptions about music teaching and learning? Prior to Billy’s story, which appears as a novella, I raise questions about popular music, its histories, and its place in music education contexts. Following the novella, I invite readers into four different “endings” to this document.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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A Survey of the Current Financial Trends in American Adult Community Bands

Description

The purpose of this study was to collect specific data concerning the use of financial resources from extant adult community bands that are members of the Association of Concerts Bands

The purpose of this study was to collect specific data concerning the use of financial resources from extant adult community bands that are members of the Association of Concerts Bands (ACB). An adult community band is defined as an ensemble consisting primarily of amateur adult woodwind, brass, and percussion performers, the majority of whom are not satisfying school, college, or military requirements through participation.

This investigation comprises two main parts: 1) a perusal of the development of adult community bands within the overall history of bands in the United States, including, when possible, financial aspects of their operations; and 2) an examination of financial trends in ACB organizations, as illustrated by survey data.

An electronic survey was designed to examine six questions: 1) what are the budgets of today’s community bands, 2) how do bands compensate their staff and personnel, 3) where are bands spending their money, 4) what are their sources of income, 5) how are their current financial trends different than Peter Martin’s 1983 study on community bands, and 6) are there trends in regards to their expenses, revenues, bands’ longevity, and locations? In order to make more accurate conclusions, the author divided bands into five classes, based on their financial structure, to analyze and compare data.

Five major trends were observed: 1) current adult bands are usually non-profit organizations that list monetary compensation for their conductors on their Annual Operating Budget (AOB), 2) fifty-four percent (54%) of bands with an AOB spend between $4,000 and $19,999, 3) after adjusting for inflation, monetary compensation has remained nearly the same over the last thirty-four years, 4) music is the most common expense among adult bands, and 5) since 1983, the number of bands reporting government funding as a revenue source has decreased.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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A culturally relevant symbol: participant engagement in a volunteer tourism youth education program and impacts on program youth

Description

Engagement as a concept and emerging theory has been explored, but key elements have not been clearly described, and as such, work has not been comprehensive in nature. Research was

Engagement as a concept and emerging theory has been explored, but key elements have not been clearly described, and as such, work has not been comprehensive in nature. Research was needed to explore the concept and theory of engagement in general, as well its application to the study of volunteer tourism. Additional research was also needed to incorporate youth perspectives of a volunteer tourism program, along with exploration of engagement impacts on program youth. The purpose of this case study was to explore participant engagement in a volunteer tourism youth education program and impacts on program youth as perceived by program participants (volunteer tourist teachers, adult residents, and program youth). Confined within the Engagement Theoretical Framework, data were retrieved from nonprofit documents and websites, researcher observations, individual interviews, and focus groups (two focus groups used participant generated photo elicitation method).

Findings suggest participant engagement in a volunteer tourism program is related to the themes of connection, communication, and hope. The primary reason participant engagement in this program is due to the Mpingo (tree), the symbolic bridge between community members and volunteer tourist teachers. This culturally relevant symbol has linkages to the study of signs (or symbols) called semiotics. Through volunteers traveling to this area to teach, this culturally relevant symbol helps to connect, aids in the communication between, and gives hope to, participants. Significant contributions of this study to literature include: volunteer tourist and community member engagement plays an important role in the planning, and the sustaining, of volunteer tourism community development programs today; program youth perspectives about program impacts may result in prospective youth leadership and future adult civic engagement; program skill matched volunteers are likely to be repeat volunteers which leads to group cohesion and program sustainability; and the major theme of hope appears to be a significant motive for program participation in a community development project. In terms of deep meaning ascribed to culturally relevant symbols, this unique finding contributes to engagement research by understanding there are multiple dimensions involved in a diverse group of participants engaged in a specific community program.

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Date Created
  • 2018

Troubling disability: experiences of disability in, through, and around music

Description

The purpose of this study was to trouble existing conceptions of disability that ground music education literature and practice. I sought plausible insights into how disability is experienced in, through,

The purpose of this study was to trouble existing conceptions of disability that ground music education literature and practice. I sought plausible insights into how disability is experienced in, through, and/or around music by participants who are disabled persons/persons with disabilities (DP/PwD). Insights gained might allow readers to complexify and trouble taken-for-granted assumptions about disability. Questions included: (a) How do participants experience disability in, through, and around music? (b) What plausible insights related to disability can be gained by attending to participants’ experiences of disability in, through, and around music? (c) What plausible insights related to inclusion can be gained by attending to participants’ experiences of disability in, through, and around music? The inquiry approach was grounded in Buberian relational ontology, phenomenology, interactional theories of disability, and narrative.

Seven DP/PwD participated in this study: (a) Erica, a 14-year-old diagnosed with a developmental disability of unknown etiology; (b) Duke, a drummer diagnosed with Williams syndrome; (c) Birdie, an abstract visual artist with epilepsy who used music to inform her art; (d) Daren, a b-boy/breakdancer diagnosed with Tourette syndrome, (e) Sienna, a legally blind social work college student who played banjo in a music therapy-based bluegrass band and participated in musical theatre; (f) Ice Queen, an undergraduate flute player recently diagnosed with Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and (g) Culann, an adult counselor and music listener with ADHD and mood disorders. Data generation included conversational interviews, observations, artmaking, and serendipitous data.

Data co-generated with participants were crafted into narratives of their lifeworlds, including description of their experiences with disability in, through, and around music and in other aspects of their lives. An envisioned conversation among all participants demonstrates the shifts and complexities in the meanings of disability and unpacks different ways participants describe and understand disability and the myriad roles that music plays in their lifeworlds. The final chapter of the study offers discussions and suggestions regarding thinking about and approaching disability (i.e., interactional theories, intersectionality, and identity), inclusion (i.e., belonging, suggestions by participants, and anti-ableist pedagogy), and research/writing.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019