Matching Items (3)

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Advance Care Planning: How Do We Get to Completion?

Description

Advance care planning (ACP) is the act of deciding ones wishes at the end-of-life and making those wishes known. Healthcare providers rely on these wishes to provide end-of-life care. Despite

Advance care planning (ACP) is the act of deciding ones wishes at the end-of-life and making those wishes known. Healthcare providers rely on these wishes to provide end-of-life care. Despite the impact ACP has on quality of life at the end-of-life, most conversations remain undocumented. Even when ACP conversations take place, completion rates remain at an all-time low. This report explored the impact of appointment call reminders and patient portal messages on advance directive (AD) completion and documentation in the EHR. Following completion, a primary care practice experienced an increase in ACP conversation and ACP completion in the EHR. This report will discuss the methods utilized to improve ACP completion.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-28

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Primary Provider Education Regarding Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

The purpose of this project is to look at the relationship between education about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and knowledge, attitudes and beliefs in adult primary care providers. The project

The purpose of this project is to look at the relationship between education about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and knowledge, attitudes and beliefs in adult primary care providers. The project addresses the transition challenges adults with ASD have in finding a primary care provider who is comfortable and competent with ASD. Education was provided to adult primary care providers in a multi-site primary care clinic in a large metropolitan city in the Southwestern United States. The Modified Knowledge/Attitudes/Belief instrument was used. A pre-test was administered prior to the education session, then a post-test and a one-month post-test were given afterward.

The results of the education program showed that attitudes and beliefs increased after the education and continued to increase more in the month following. Knowledge improved after the education session but declined after a month although scores were not back to the pre-education level. Primary care providers who receive education about ASD may be more comfortable in caring for this population and more likely to welcome adults with ASD into their practice. Education for primary care providers is key to improving health outcomes for adults with ASD.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-30

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The Effect of Post Partum Breastfeeding Peer Support on Breastfeeding Success Outcomes

Description

The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented and exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first six months of life is the target of national and global health care organizations.

The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented and exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first six months of life is the target of national and global health care organizations. Although initial breastfeeding is on the rise, the percentage of infants still breastfeeding at six months drops significantly. In the population of newly delivered mothers of an obstetric practice, there is no readily accessible breastfeeding support offered following hospital discharge. A review of relevant literature revealed that lack of support is often cited as a key factor in the discontinuation of breastfeeding, whereas the evidence shows that participation in peer support has a positive effect on breastfeeding self-efficacy, which can have a positive effect on breastfeeding duration.

To address this problem, the initiation of a breastfeeding closed social network Facebook group for this practice setting population was developed and implemented to provide readily accessible peer support and have a positive effect on the outcome of breastfeeding self-efficacy. Three months after initiation of the Facebook group, an anonymous voluntary survey was offered to group members, and 25 members participated in the survey. Responses demonstrated that peer support is helpful with breastfeeding confidence and that, following participation in the group, the respondents wanted to continue breastfeeding.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-03