Matching Items (48)

Deconstructing and Recreating Japanese Variety Television

Description

While studying in Japan, I became fascinated by the variety shows my roommates would watch. These shows featured a flexible format with comedians and other entertainers participating in a wide

While studying in Japan, I became fascinated by the variety shows my roommates would watch. These shows featured a flexible format with comedians and other entertainers participating in a wide variety of activities. For my senior creative project, I decided to determine what features were essential to Japanese variety shows, and to then use these features to create my own program.
In order to determine the essential features of Japanese variety television, I watched a total of 22 episodes of three popular Japanese variety shows: Gaki no tsukai ya arahende (ダウンタウンのガキの使いやあらへんで! Usually abbreviated as ガキの使い), London Hearts (ロンドンハーツ), and Utaban (うたばん). I chose these three shows because of their differing styles, popular comedic hosts, and impressive longevity, with a combined 58 years of runtime. Through my research, I was able to assemble the analyses of basic and technical features found in the next section of this document in addition to several pages of my own notes used to design my original program.
My own program, American Joke (アメリカンジョーク), is meant to be filmed in America featuring an entirely Japanese cast. The main idea of the show is to capitalize on the comedic potential of cultural differences by having Japanese comedians interact with American people and traditions.
In order to showcase the show, I filmed a short “sizzle reel” video featuring Japanese exchange students as the cast. Segments filmed included our “comedians” learning the high jump from ASU track athletes, bringing Japanese fermented soybeans to campus for American students to taste, and participating in an American-themed quiz show.

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  • 2014-05

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All Walks Project: New Chapter Guide

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All Walks Project is a student-led nonprofit dedicated to spreading awareness about domestic sex trafficking on college campuses by implementing replicable Student Chapter models on both high school and college

All Walks Project is a student-led nonprofit dedicated to spreading awareness about domestic sex trafficking on college campuses by implementing replicable Student Chapter models on both high school and college campuses. Through the All Walks Project: New Chapter Guide, we explore the effectiveness of peer-to-peer grassroots student organizations, and we provide students with a structured framework to create an effective grassroots campaign against trafficking of their own, with personalized assistance from the All Walks Project's Regional Representatives. This guide explores walks students through the step-by-step process of creating an All Walks Student Chapter. These steps include registering the chapter as a club with the host school, filing a funding request, setting up regular meeting times, connecting with a sister school, becoming educated about sex trafficking, creating a market strategy to fit the specific school, creating an effective student executive board, creating the chapter's social media presence, and registering the chapter with an All Walks Project Regional Representative. This guide also provides the chapter leaders with ideas and guidelines for events, meeting agendas, flyers, and many other relevant resources in order to involve the chapters in official All Walks Project nationwide anti-trafficking campaigns.

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  • 2015-12

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Commodifying Asian Aesthetics and Eliminating Asian Bodies: Misrepresentations of Asianness in Science Fiction Film and Television

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This work examines three common practices—yellowface in Cloud Atlas (2012), whitewashing in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013), and absence in Firefly (2002)—employed in popular science fiction that represent Asianness and

This work examines three common practices—yellowface in Cloud Atlas (2012), whitewashing in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013), and absence in Firefly (2002)—employed in popular science fiction that represent Asianness and disregard the Asian body. Though the creators purport to have progressive ideals at the center of their production choices, their works call on Techno-Orientalist and Orientalist tropes and divorce them from the Asian body, implicitly continuing the Orientalist argument of Western supremacy even in representing Asianness.

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  • 2017-05

State of Grace & ACT1 Project Portfolio

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My thesis is comprised of three components: the first is the short film, “State of Grace.” The second is a Project Portfolio of my films produced from May 2016 –

My thesis is comprised of three components: the first is the short film, “State of Grace.” The second is a Project Portfolio of my films produced from May 2016 – April 2017; this document includes concept notes for each project, visual inspirations, shot lists, storyboards, and budget breakdowns. The individual video URLs are included at the end of the portfolio. The third component is a video showcasing each of those projects in a demo reel.

The short film, “State of Grace,” is about a woman who reminisces about a past relationship on a night drive. The memories of this relationship compel her to show up at his door. The title, “State of Grace,” is a reference to the character’s emotional state. She is unable to move forward with a new relationship because she is still in love with her ex-boyfriend; however, her ex-boyfriend has moved on and she cannot reclaim that love. The title also refers to the struggle of reconciling love with heartbreak. The film is predominantly silent, accompanied by a piano driven score that reflects the character’s state of mind. The project is highly imagistic, intercutting between happy memories of the couple and the woman driving alone. The piece ends with the character at her ex-boyfriend’s door, intending to tell him she’s still in love with him. She changes her mind when she realizes he isn’t alone. The production influences are described in greater detail in the Project Portfolio.

“ACT1” is the brand I’ve assigned to my films. The Project Portfolio includes concept notes for each of the seven projects I’ve produced, directed, and edited in the past year (May 2016 – April 2017). In addition to a written description of the creative influences on the project, I’ve included my visual inspirations for each piece. All of the films are silent, feature slow motion photography, and are accompanied by original music. The visual expression of emotion inspires most of my work, along with connections in human relationships. Overall, my films have a cinematic, surreal aesthetic, experimenting with ethereal lighting and high frame rates. The shot lists and storyboards are included for most of the projects, along with an itemized budget breakdown. Since I’m most inspired by imagery, my shooting style is improvisational—none of my films have formal screenplays. Intercutting and jump cuts are frequent editing techniques in my projects, including the demo reel.

I edited the reel, connecting the different projects via match cuts whenever possible. The match cuts are on similar composition, content, or camera motion. The music is original and synth-heavy. The title animation features parallax overlays and lens flares to reference the surreal aesthetics in my films.

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  • 2016-12

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The Past and Present of The Importance of Being Earnest

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This thesis is a two-part theatre and literature project on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. The research component will consist of gathering information from the origins of

This thesis is a two-part theatre and literature project on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. The research component will consist of gathering information from the origins of this play in writing and in production to further understand my knowledge of the time it was written in and how it has been interpreted over the years. The theatrical elements will come as I direct and produce my own production of the play, and compare my research of Wilde's play and past productions to my own directorial decisions in attempt to make a successful student performed play.

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  • 2016-12

A Monster in the House: Gothic and Victorian Representations of Female Madness

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A Monster in the House: Gothic and Victorian Representations of Female Madness explores female madness and mental illness as perceived by Gothic and Victorian society over the span of three

A Monster in the House: Gothic and Victorian Representations of Female Madness explores female madness and mental illness as perceived by Gothic and Victorian society over the span of three literary works: The Fall of the House of Usher (1839); Jane Eyre (1847), and The Yellow Wallpaper (1892). Each text features a ‘mad’ female character--Madeline Usher (The Fall of the House of Usher), Bertha Mason (Jane Eyre), and Jane (The Yellow Wallpaper)--who symbolizes the vast inequality women of the mid-to-late 1900s endured. Each character challenges social and religious mores and subverts the established order of a sacrosanct, male-dominated perspective. In Victorian society, female divergence was equated with madness and “moral insanity.” The penalty was isolation, confinement, and/or the woman’s complete removal from society. Depression, aggression, overt sexuality and excessive mental or physical stimulation are just a few of the characteristics considered to be socially inappropriate. In assessing these texts, this essay examines and problematizes the prevailing medical practices and beliefs of the time, the mischaracterization and demonization of natural biological female functions, and the prescribed medical treatments and cures for madness (insanity) and mental illness. Furthermore, this essay reveals how each text features female characters who weaponize their madness to usurp their male oppressors, and as tools to speak out against the hegemonic discourse. A common theme to many Gothic and Victorian novels is the threat posed by female characters whose behavior directly challenges then-contemporary social, behavioral and religious standards. In defense of these institutionalized mores, the deviant character is portrayed as “morally insane,” or inherently evil. What bridges these texts together are the unifying themes of female mental illness, sexual prowess, societal stereotypes, and how each of these female characters employed their madness in an effort to resist and overcome persecution.

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  • 2017-05

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Dark Knights to Remember: A Developmental Analysis of The Batman

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Batman is one of the most iconic characters in the history of popular culture. Ever since his creation in 1939, the character and his stories have gone through several changes.

Batman is one of the most iconic characters in the history of popular culture. Ever since his creation in 1939, the character and his stories have gone through several changes. In my thesis, I explore and analyze the character within the nearly 20-year period in which he went through the most significant changes (1968-1986). Overall, these changes can be summarized as a shift from a lighthearted superhero consistently placed in campy situations to a dark and brooding vigilante who brutally dispatches his enemies. While analyzing the different versions of this character in this period of time, I reference the conclusions of two scholars: Travis Langley and Chuck Tate. Langley wrote a general psychological analysis of Batman by considering the essential characteristics of the character found in all forms of media. Tate concluded that Batman only uses hostile aggression for the sake of deriving pleasure form the pain he causes to criminals. After analyzing the comics as my primary sources, I have concluded that the general findings of Tate and Langley actually ignore the subtle details of changes in the humanity and self-awareness of the character through time. The lighthearted version of Batman in the late 60's is actually a self-obsessed narcissist, but as time passes, the darker mood of the character can be attributed to an increased acknowledgment of the destructive nature of his unique lifestyle. As the character grows more accepting of himself and his own reasons for continuing this lifestyle, his motivations become less self-centered. Overall, the central change of the character throughout time can be traced back to the status of his inner conflict between normal, human desires and the pure desire for constant vengeance.

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  • 2015-05

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Body Integrity Identity Disorder Screenplay

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Body Integrity Identity Disorder Screenplay Abstract
The Body Integrity Identity Disorder Screenplay, tentatively entitled Detach, is a full-­‐length feature film script. Based on a fascinating mental disorder (generally referred to

Body Integrity Identity Disorder Screenplay Abstract
The Body Integrity Identity Disorder Screenplay, tentatively entitled Detach, is a full-­‐length feature film script. Based on a fascinating mental disorder (generally referred to as the acronym BIID) where an individual does not associate a limb with the rest of their body, the script follows a sufferer and a reporter attempting to write a story on his struggle.
As my creative sensibilities and skills have developed over the span of my undergraduate career, the most ambitious undertaking imaginable for myself at this moment is the completion of a feature script. This project was a significant test of my storytelling skills and ability to format an unusual tale into a conceivable film.
I am proud of the end result and believe that the final version of my screenplay is an accurate representation of my taste as a filmmaker. I hope to actualize this project one day and help facilitate a transformation of the script into a feature film.

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  • 2015-05

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Images of Crusaders Portrayed in Film and Their Use as Tools to Serve Contemporary Goals

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This paper aims to investigate how the portrayal of the crusaders in twentieth and twenty-first century film has evolved and how they have become tools in serving contemporary goals, including

This paper aims to investigate how the portrayal of the crusaders in twentieth and twenty-first century film has evolved and how they have become tools in serving contemporary goals, including those of individual filmmakers and broad societal ideologies. Through the analysis of five films, in both narrative and cinematography, spanning from the 1950s until 2011, themes of redemption, maturity, and the dichotomy of "good" and "bad" are discussed, as well as their chronological evolution in regards to the crusading hero. These films, widely ranging in historical subject matter and country of origin, show a greater range of evolution for the holy war hero and the important themes widely associated with them.

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  • 2015-05

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The Beautiful Grotesque and Other Glorified Horrors: A Study of the Abjection of Female Beauty in Modern Art

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The following study is an attempt to analyze the idea of the abject through the grotesque representation of the female body in contemporary visual art. The focus of the paper

The following study is an attempt to analyze the idea of the abject through the grotesque representation of the female body in contemporary visual art. The focus of the paper will remain within the scheme of the modern Western ideology of physical female beauty, social affirmations, and restraints. My hypothesis is that the grotesque imagery of the female body in modern art redefines beauty and liberates the female subject by turning the gaze upon itself. The proposition of this study emerges from Julia Kristeva’s theory of the abject as it applies to the viewer and the viewed. There is a distinct relationship between grotesque ideas and the female body as it is viewed in the late 20th and 21st centuries. Visual imagery has become increasingly bold in its presentation for good or for bad. I chose the selected artists because they present dark, often socially ‘ugly’ depictions of the female body in honest, straightforward ways. I question why the grotesque is not popularly recognized on the ‘beauty scale’, yet our society craves this kind of imagery. The purpose of this study is to identify and explain abjection within depictions of the grotesque. This exploration of the female figure and its portrayal through the eyes of modern sculptors, painters, and designers aims to highlight that 20th and 21st century aesthetics have moved towards themes of grotesqueness in beauty, amidst cultural objectification and materialization. These themes perhaps present Western culture’s underlying physical insecurities and self-loathing.

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  • 2015-05