Matching Items (10)

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Walt Disney World and Universal Studios: Understanding Strategy in the Theme Park Sector

Description

Theme parks have been expanding in size and scope since their inception decades past, a trend that the academic world has begun to notice. There is a wide variety of

Theme parks have been expanding in size and scope since their inception decades past, a trend that the academic world has begun to notice. There is a wide variety of academic literature on tourism, but not nearly as much on theme parks. As a unique entertainment concept, theme parks have yet to be studied as extensively as other tourism settings. The purpose of this study is to expand on the current academic research concerning theme parks. The researcher applied directed content analysis to dozens of mass media articles in an attempt to identify strategies currently in use in the theme park industry, thereby filling a gap in academic research on the practical application of strategy in the theme park industry. The content analysis consisted of 87 articles from 34 United States-based sources ranging in year from 1985 to 2013, including both large- and small-scale publications, in regards to circulation, spanning the entire country. At the conclusion of the data collection process, the researcher recorded 225 statements demonstrating eight distinct strategies historically present in the theme park industry. The statements from the articles were extracted, analyzed and categorized as discussed below. Those strategies fit into the following eight categories: (1) value, (2) uniqueness, (3) niche, (4) innovation, (5) variety, (6) quality, (7) currency, and (8) convenience. Results from this study introduced two new key strategies being applied in the theme park industry that had not been previously included in the academic literature. The first new strategy discovered was currency. The strategy of providing something current means the theme park attempted to give its guests experiences that were culturally relevant at that time and modern in the theme itself, like creating a ride from a new movie. The second new strategy was convenience, in which case the theme park attempted to make its experiences more accessible for a single member in a party, or the entire group. Both of these new strategies appeared frequently, often more than the six strategies originally identified in the academic literature review. As theme parks continue to grow and diversify in the United States and around the world, it is important for professionals in tourism and business to understand the industry's progression. By combining previous knowledge and adding new research, this study has provided a foundation for future research and analysis on the dynamics of the theme park industry on a national and international scale.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Studying Abroad in Fiji: A Non-Traditional Student's Perspective

Description

During the summer of June 2014, the researcher, a non-traditional student, studied abroad in Fiji with Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change leaving behind a family

During the summer of June 2014, the researcher, a non-traditional student, studied abroad in Fiji with Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change leaving behind a family and financial responsibilities. The program was part of a growing trend as a short-term study abroad experience lasting only eight days. A service-learning project was completed at Votua Village on the Coral Coast which included a homestay and planting on the farm. An autoethnographical approach was used to describe this experience using a personal narrative written in first-person to evoke an emotional response. As a non-traditional student, the experience was probably profoundly different than it may have been for a majority of the class. The motivations, fears, and challenges associated with being a non-traditional student are discussed as well as the mother's guilt that many women experience when working outside of the home towards a personal achievement. The benefits of study abroad to non-traditional students is explained, as is the need for further research regarding their inclusion into these programs. Possible expansions of the study abroad program to include more of the non- traditional demographic within the student body at ASU are discussed. Several recommendations follow the narrative that may help to increase equitable access to study abroad for all students at the tertiary level. This work is a reflection on the researcher's experience as part of a diverse yet mostly traditional group of 35 students that made the trip to Fiji from a non-traditional student perspective and includes photographs as a visual autoethnography from the adventure to enhance and supplement the narrative.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Experience Ireland

Description

Experience Ireland is a multimedia interactive website about ten different heritage tourism sites and traditions. The sites range from a farm in Dublin to a fort on the edge of

Experience Ireland is a multimedia interactive website about ten different heritage tourism sites and traditions. The sites range from a farm in Dublin to a fort on the edge of a cliff in the Aran Islands. The website also includes traditions such as storytelling and Irish dancing. Hear from experts, tour guides, and tourists about the history behind each site/tradition and what it means to them.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Representation of the United Kingdom Pre- and Post- Referendum

Description

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study examines the United Kingdom's image, and determines whether the dissonance exist pre- and post- referendum in the internal imagery of the United Kingdom and imagery portrayed aboard. Leading newspapers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Europe are analyzed to determine the predominant themes. Semi-structured interviews are conducted with the U.S. tour operators and Arizona's travel agents. Tour brochures and user-generated content on TripAdvisor are analyzed to study tourists' responses to Brexit. Skift is analyzed to project future growth in tourism industry. Results show that the leadings newspapers projects similar concerns negatively and positively pre- and post- referendum. Uncertainty in policy changes leads to other themes that are identified such as investment, employment, trade, independence, market growth, etc. It projects the international trade, domestic market growth and global market growth will be significantly impact by Brexit due to higher tariff and regulations on migrants in the United Kingdom. In contrast, travel brochures are marketing UK from heritage, historical attractions, and special events, but they do not reflect the influence of Brexit on how tour operators market UK pre- and post- referendum. Further data is conducted on the semi-structured interviews with travel agents across Arizona, but travel agents responded with Brexit has no influences on US tourists. Additional content analysis on VisitBritain/VisitEngland shows the growth in tourism industry by an increasing provided data collection on tourism performance that reflect there is an increasing departure rate of US tourists in UK after the referendum. User-generated content on TripAdvisor and Skift align with the identified themes in leading newspapers from US, UK, and Europe such as uncertainty in policy change. The present study further outlines preferable method to advance future studies on the destination image of U.K. during and after the Brexit.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Companionship preferences in incentive travel

Description

Incentive travel continues to grow as a form of motivation in the work place. However, there is little research that has examined future potential incentive travelers' wants and needs from

Incentive travel continues to grow as a form of motivation in the work place. However, there is little research that has examined future potential incentive travelers' wants and needs from an incentive travel trip. The purpose of this study was to understand how and in what way various potential incentive travelers' beliefs, including attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and motivation, influence their future inclusion of a significant other on an incentive travel trip using a modified theory of planned behavior. Moreover, the potential moderating effect of past inclusion of a significant other experience was examined as well. The study collected 129 usable responses from potential incentive travelers from companies based in Iowa and Arizona. The research for this project was conducted through online questionnaires that included quantitative and qualitative questions. The study used exploratory factor analysis (EFA), Pearson's correlation and multiple regression to test study hypotheses. The results of the multiple regression indicated three constructs, attitudes, subjective norm and motivation appeared to be statistically significant, while perceived behavioral control was not statistically significant in predicting potential incentive travelers' intended inclusion of a significant other. Perceived behavioral control was not significant because the control of including a significant other is dependent on the participant's employer. Pearson's correlation found a moderating effect of past inclusion of a significant other on subjective norm and perceived behavioral control. In conclusion, the results validated the theory of planned behavior in the context of incentive travelers' inclusion of a significant other.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Enlightened travelers?: cultural attitudes, cultural competency and study abroad

Description

In this study the impact of outside the classroom activities and experiences of study abroad participants on cultural attitude change and perceived cultural competence was investigated. Motives to participate, expectations

In this study the impact of outside the classroom activities and experiences of study abroad participants on cultural attitude change and perceived cultural competence was investigated. Motives to participate, expectations and outcomes of study abroad programs were also explored. The study used a mixed methods approach and was conducted in three parts including an exploratory sequential component followed by a concurrent embedded component. The exploratory sequential component included a photo elicitation project, the results of which contributed both to the results of the study and the development of the questionnaire used in the concurrent embedded component. The concurrent embedded component used a pre and post-test survey design and included a qualitative writing exercise with select participants between the completion of their pre and post-test questionnaires. The results suggest that study abroad participation does result in changes in both participants' cultural attitudes and cultural competency. It was hypothesized that length of time abroad and the cultural distance of the host country would have an influence on the change in cultural attitudes and cultural competency. As found in previous research, length of time abroad was not found to be a major contributing factor to this change when considering the results of the pre and post-test survey. However, the results of the qualitative studies resulted in many questions about the impact of length abroad. Participants in longer-term programs discussed changes in their cultural attitudes in a more complex way than short-term participants. Longer-term participants expressed changes in their cultural competency differently as well, though not in a way that it can be conclusively said they were more culturally competent. The reverse was the case for cultural distance. Cultural distance was a factor in the changes in cultural competency, however not in cultural attitudes when considering the results of the quantitative component. The qualitative results seem to bring up more questions. While shorter-term participants discussed cultural competency differently than longer-term participants, surprisingly the short-term programs had a higher percentage of participants studying in countries with large cultural distance than did long-term programs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The economic viability of heritage festivals

Description

Many scholars agree that heritage tourism has grown in recent years. It has become a unique way for communities to diversify their economies while preserving local culture and heritage.

Many scholars agree that heritage tourism has grown in recent years. It has become a unique way for communities to diversify their economies while preserving local culture and heritage. One unique way communities are doing this is through heritage festivals. These festivals have a significant impact on local communities and are multifaceted as they do not just provide economic impact to host communities, but also positive or potentially negative social and environmental impacts.

In recent years, a more sustainable approach integrating economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts has been suggested when analyzing short term event such as festivals. It is important for event managers and scholars alike to understand these potential impacts as heritage festivals continue to evolve and prevalent part of heritage tourism.

This study aims to measure and quantify the economic, social and environmental impacts of two heritage festivals – Gold Rush Days and Bluegrass Festival, closely following Andersson and Lundberg’s 2013 study on commensurability and sustainability utilizing willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA). Both are annual heritage festivals and take place in Wickenburg, Arizona. Primary data collection methods are used to gather information regarding economic and social impacts. Paper questionnaires distributed via stratified random sample to festival attendees and town residents is the survey instrument used in the study. To determine environmental impacts, secondary data in the form of stakeholder interviews are conducted.

Findings suggest a positive economic impact to the town of Wickenburg. Visitor expenditures, retained local spending and direct, indirect, and induced impacts are presented. Social impacts show a generally positive attitude toward the festival from a resident perspective. Environmental impacts show that collaboration among town stakeholders is needed to better determine festival environmental impact as no formal measures of impact are currently being recorded. Further empirical research is needed to better determine these impacts.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Metropolitan cuisine tourism: exploring food tourists to the Creole cuisine in New Orleans, LA USA

Description

Cuisines are becoming increasingly significant in a tourist's experience and as such looking into different cuisines and their effects on the tourist's destination provides strong indicators of the outlook for

Cuisines are becoming increasingly significant in a tourist's experience and as such looking into different cuisines and their effects on the tourist's destination provides strong indicators of the outlook for the destination. Metropolitan areas within the United States have a history of being known for specific food items as well as types of cuisines. This study explores the Metropolitan area of New Orleans and the cuisine specific to this region: the Creole cuisine. A mixed methods approach was used to identify the Creole cuisine within the New Orleans area as both a regional cuisine and as a culturally significant cuisine, within the context of the United States of America. Once established, and through the help of the local New Orleans' Convention and Visitors Bureau, an online questionnaire was distributed to individuals that had shown an interest in visiting the New Orleans area. The questionnaire identified the characteristics of the Creole cuisine and the respondents' most recent trip to New Orleans. The Brief Sensation Seeking Scale, adjusted for cuisine tourism, provided a categorical separation of the respondents into three groupings: "Foodies", "Semi-foodies", and "Non-foodies". Two important findings emerge from this study, the cultural significant cuisine segmentation model and the foodie scale. These two findings allow for an in depth look at characteristics of regional cuisines and food tourists, while providing a way to predict food characteristics of both destination and individual.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Co-Created Destination Branding for Creative MICE Tourism: Building Synergies with Cultural Heritage Assets

Description

This study develops a Creative MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions/conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism Destination Branding Model (CMDBM), and argues for co-creation and synergies between MICE and heritage resources in a popular

This study develops a Creative MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions/conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism Destination Branding Model (CMDBM), and argues for co-creation and synergies between MICE and heritage resources in a popular business destination. MICE tourism can be enhanced through co-created offerings by adding innovative value to MICE tourism experiences. The proposed CMDBM framework aims to help determine how a destination can develop a co-created MICE brand through collaboration with key stakeholders to better meet potential MICE travelers’ other touristic interests and cultural values.

The research project was undertaken in collaboration with the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, and several heritage institutions in New Orleans. The study adopts both qualitative and quantitative research designs to explore the destination brand strategy. The qualitative data were acquired through interviews with relevant stakeholders to analyze the use of destination branding strategies and understand existing and potential synergies with heritage institutions. The quantitative portion measures MICE attendees’ perceptions of the co-created value of enhancing MICE destinations with cultural heritage appeal. NRPA Conference attendees’ responses provide a practical understanding for stakeholders.

This research provides both practical and theoretical insights for the tourism industry for destination communities, and has salient conceptual and theoretical implications for the academy. The study confirms that MICE tourism, collaborating with cultural heritage assets, can enrich MICE travelers’ travel experiences. The destination brand strategy was identified with supportive cultural heritage resources and an appropriate destination brand framework of MICE tourism was proposed. As confirmed by MICE attendees’ evaluations from the case study, it extends the literature on destination brand, destination brand awareness, destination brand experience, destination brand personality, and destination brand equity.

The empirical exploration of MICE destination branding has been handicapped in existing literature by a lack of conceptual marketing perspectives. This work will lend credence to the important aspect of business destination marketing and stresses building synergy and adding value to MICE tourism experiences. As destination marketing programs become competitive, especially in the context of equitable distribution of monetary benefits across different stakeholders, creating synergies become crucial in the destination. A co-created brand strategy can help make destinations more competitive.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Casas Montezumas: chorographies, ancient ruins, and placemaking in the Salt and Gila River valleys, Arizona, 1694-1868

Description

This dissertation uses the narrative practice of chorography as a genre for assessing the history of placemaking in the Salt and Gila River region of central Arizona from the late

This dissertation uses the narrative practice of chorography as a genre for assessing the history of placemaking in the Salt and Gila River region of central Arizona from the late seventeenth century through the mid-nineteenth century. Chorography concerns the descriptive representation of places in the world, usually of regions associated with a particular nation. Traditionally, chorography has served as a written method for describing geographical places as they existed historically. By integrating descriptions of natural features with descriptions of built features, such as ancient ruins, chorography infuses the physical landscape with cultural and historical meaning. This dissertation relies on a body of Spanish- and English-language chorographies produced across three centuries to interpret how Euro-American descriptions of Hohokam ruins in the Salt and Gila River valleys shaped local placemaking. Importantly, the disparate chorographic texts produced during the late-seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries reflect ‘discursive continuity’—a continuity of thought spanning a long and frequently disregarded period in the history of central Arizona, in which ruminations about the ruins of ancient cities and irrigation canals formed the basis for what people knew, or thought they knew, about the little-known region. When settlers arrived in the newly-formed Arizona Territory in the 1860s to establish permanent settlement in the Salt and Gila River valleys, they brought with them a familiarity with these writings, maps, and other chorographical materials. On one hand, Arizonans viewed the ancient ruins as literal evidence for the region’s agricultural possibilities. On the other hand, Aztec and Cíbola myths associated with the ruins, told and retold by Europeans and Americans during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, offered an imaginative context for the establishment and promotion of American settlement in central Arizona.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017