Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

154053-Thumbnail Image.png

System identification using discontinuous data sets and PID loop-shaping control of a vertical take-off and landing drone

Description

Vertical taking off and landing (VTOL) drones started to emerge at the beginning of this century, and finds applications in the vast areas of mapping, rescuing, logistics, etc. Usually a

Vertical taking off and landing (VTOL) drones started to emerge at the beginning of this century, and finds applications in the vast areas of mapping, rescuing, logistics, etc. Usually a VTOL drone control system design starts from a first principles model. Most of the VTOL drones are in the shape of a quad-rotor which is convenient for dynamic analysis.

In this project, a VTOL drone with shape similar to a Convair XFY-1 is studied and the primary focus is developing and examining an alternative method to identify a system model from the input and output data, with which it is possible to estimate system parameters and compute model uncertainties on discontinuous data sets. We verify the models by designing controllers that stabilize the yaw, pitch, and roll angles for the VTOL drone in the hovering state.

This project comprises of three stages: an open-loop identification to identify the yaw and pitch dynamics, an intermediate closed-loop identification to identify the roll action dynamic and a closed-loop identification to refine the identification of yaw and pitch action. In open and closed loop identifications, the reference signals sent to the servos were recorded as inputs to the system and the angles and angular velocities in yaw and pitch directions read by inertial measurement unit were recorded as outputs of the system. In the intermediate closed loop identification, the difference between the reference signals sent to the motors on the contra-rotators was recorded as input and the roll angular velocity is recorded as output. Next, regressors were formed by using a coprime factor structure and then parameters of the system were estimated using the least square method. Multiplicative and divisive uncertainties were calculated from the data set and were used to guide PID loop-shaping controller design.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

158513-Thumbnail Image.png

Scheduling in Wireless and Healthcare Networks

Description

This dissertation studies the scheduling in two stochastic networks, a co-located wireless network and an outpatient healthcare network, both of which have a cyclic planning horizon and a deadline-related performance

This dissertation studies the scheduling in two stochastic networks, a co-located wireless network and an outpatient healthcare network, both of which have a cyclic planning horizon and a deadline-related performance metric.

For the co-located wireless network, a time-slotted system is considered. A cycle of planning horizon is called a frame, which consists of a fixed number of time slots. The size of the frame is determined by the upper-layer applications. Packets with deadlines arrive at the beginning of each frame and will be discarded if missing their deadlines, which are in the same frame. Each link of the network is associated with a quality of service constraint and an average transmit power constraint. For this system, a MaxWeight-type problem for which the solutions achieve the throughput optimality is formulated. Since the computational complexity of solving the MaxWeight-type problem with exhaustive search is exponential even for a single-link system, a greedy algorithm with complexity O(nlog(n)) is proposed, which is also throughput optimal.

The outpatient healthcare network is modeled as a discrete-time queueing network, in which patients receive diagnosis and treatment planning that involves collaboration between multiple service stations. For each patient, only the root (first) appointment can be scheduled as the following appointments evolve stochastically. The cyclic planing horizon is a week. The root appointment is optimized to maximize the proportion of patients that can complete their care by a class-dependent deadline. In the optimization algorithm, the sojourn time of patients in the healthcare network is approximated with a doubly-stochastic phase-type distribution. To address the computational intractability, a mean-field model with convergence guarantees is proposed. A linear programming-based policy improvement framework is developed, which can approximately solve the original large-scale stochastic optimization in queueing networks of realistic sizes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020