Matching Items (3)

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Norming at scale: faculty perceptions of assessment culture and student learning outcomes assessment

Description

To foster both external and internal accountability, universities seek more effective models for student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). Meaningful and authentic measurement of program-level student learning outcomes requires engagement with

To foster both external and internal accountability, universities seek more effective models for student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). Meaningful and authentic measurement of program-level student learning outcomes requires engagement with an institution’s faculty members, especially to gather student performance assessment data using common scoring instruments, or rubrics, across a university’s many colleges and programs. Too often, however, institutions rely on faculty engagement for SLOA initiatives like this without providing necessary support, communication, and training. The resulting data may lack sufficient reliability and reflect deficiencies in an institution’s culture of assessment.

This mixed methods action research study gauged how well one form of SLOA training – a rubric-norming workshop – could affect both inter-rater reliability for faculty scorers and faculty perceptions of SLOA while exploring the nature of faculty collaboration toward a shared understanding of student learning outcomes. The study participants, ten part-time faculty members at the institution, each held primary careers in the health care industry, apart from their secondary role teaching university courses. Accordingly, each contributed expertise and experience to the rubric-norming discussions, surveys of assessment-related perceptions, and individual scoring of student performance with a common rubric. Drawing on sociocultural learning principles and the specific lens of activity theory, influences on faculty SLOA were arranged and analyzed within the heuristic framework of an activity system to discern effects of collaboration and perceptions toward SLOA on consistent rubric-scoring by faculty participants.

Findings suggest participation in the study did not correlate to increased inter-rater reliability for faculty scorers when using the common rubric. Constraints found within assessment tools and unclear institutional leadership prevented more reliable use of common rubrics. Instead, faculty participants resorted to individual assessment approaches to meaningfully guide students to classroom achievement and preparation for careers in the health care field. Despite this, faculty participants valued SLOA, collaborated readily with colleagues for shared assessment goals, and worked hard to teach and assess students meaningfully.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Validation theory into practice: asset-based academic advising with first-generation Latina engineering college students

Description

To meet the increasing demands for more STEM graduates, United States (U.S.) higher education institutions need to support the retention of minoritized populations, such as first-generation Latinas studying engineering. The

To meet the increasing demands for more STEM graduates, United States (U.S.) higher education institutions need to support the retention of minoritized populations, such as first-generation Latinas studying engineering. The theories influencing this study included critical race theory, the theory of validation, and community cultural wealth. Current advising practices, when viewed through a critical race theory lens, reinforce deficit viewpoints about students and reinforce color-blind ideologies. As such, current practices will fail to support first-generation Latina student persistence in engineering. A 10-week long study was conducted on validating advising practices. The advisors for the study were purposefully selected while the students were selected via a stratified sampling approach. Validating advising practices were designed to elicit student stories and explored the ways in which advisors validated or invalidated the students. Qualitative data were collected from interviews and reflections. Thematic analysis was conducted to study the influence of the validating advising practices. Results indicate each advisor acted as a different type of validating “agent” executing her practices described along a continuum of validating to invalidating practices. The students described their advisors’ practices along a continuum of prescriptive to developmental to transformational advising. While advisors began the study expressing deficit viewpoints of first-generation Latinas, the students shared multiple forms of navigational, social, aspirational, and informational capital. Those advisors who employed developmental and transformational practices recognized and drew upon those assets during their deployment of validating advising practices, thus leading to validation within the advising interactions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Teachers L.E.A.D. (Learn. Engage. Act. Discuss): a study of teacher leaders' perceptions on engagement in school improvement

Description

“If you treat an individual as he is, he will stay as he is,

but if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be

and could

“If you treat an individual as he is, he will stay as he is,

but if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be

and could be, he will become what he ought and could be.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

Teacher leaders in public education have a great amount of responsibility on their shoulders in today’s political climate. They are responsible for evaluating instruction, improving the teaching force, and raising student achievement. These responsibilities coupled with the day-to-day demands of effectively running a school have caused many teacher leaders to disengage from the true purpose of their work and have lead to retention rates that are less than desirable. This mixed methods action research study was conducted to investigate how participation in L.E.A.D. (Learn. Engage. Act. Discuss.) groups, influenced the self-perceptions teacher leaders have of their ability to engage in the change process at their schools. The innovation was a series of three action-driven sessions aimed at providing the participating teacher leaders with a space to discuss their roles in the change process at their school, their perceived engagement in those processes, and their perceived ability to navigate the technical, normative, and political dimensions of change. The greater purpose behind the design of this innovation was to provide teacher leaders with tools they could utilize that would support them in the realization that their level of engagement was not totally dependent on those around them. Through the L.E.A.D. groups, it became evident that the participating teacher leaders were resilient and optimistic individuals that, despite factors outside of their control demanding their time and energy, were still dedicated to the change process at their schools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016