Matching Items (11)

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Implementing Breastfeeding Education Into a Perinatal Medication Assisted Recovery Program

Description

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy is a time when women with OUD may be ready to begin a journey of recovery. OUD has both maternal and fetal implications. The safest way to begin recovery during pregnancy is with the initiation of either buprenorphine or methadone to prevent symptoms of withdrawal which can increase risk of fetal harm.

Both medications have the added benefit of being safe to use during lactation. There is a minimal amount of either medication that is found in breastmilk. Breastfeeding during medication assisted recovery (MAR) is linked both to improved maternal and neonatal outcomes, and improved bonding. Often women who are engaged in MAR are unaware of the benefits of breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity. Mothers may perceive breastfeeding as a danger to their baby based on misinformation and bias. Initiation of individualized and nonjudgmental breastfeeding education to women beginning an inpatient MAR program can improve maternal understanding of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding and increase intention to exclusively breastfeed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-02

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Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening in a Federally Qualified Health Center

Description

Routine cervical cancer screening has significantly decreased the mortality rate of cervical cancer. Today, cervical cancer predominantly affects those who are rarely or never screened. Government programs are in place

Routine cervical cancer screening has significantly decreased the mortality rate of cervical cancer. Today, cervical cancer predominantly affects those who are rarely or never screened. Government programs are in place to provide cervical cancer screening at little to no cost, yet screening rates remain suboptimal.

This project evaluated an evidence-based intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among underserved women in a federally qualified health center (FQHC). Female patients ages 21 to 65 years without history of hysterectomy (n=1,710) were sent reminders to their phones through the electronic health record (EHR). The message included educational material about the screening process and an announcement regarding government aid for free or reduced cost screening.

The number of patients who made an appointment after receiving the message was assessed two months later. In total, 156 responses were collected, and 28 patients made an appointment for screening. The most frequently observed category of Ethnicity was Hispanic/Latina (n = 24, 86%). The most frequently observed category of Insurance was Title X (n = 13, 46%). The observations for Age had an average of 41.04 (SD = 9.93). Using an EHR communication function to send motivational reminders has shown some promise for increasing cervical cancer screening, thereby reducing cervical cancer mortality among the underserved.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-18

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A Gap Analysis of Syphilis Screening During Pregnancy by Prenatal Care Clinicians

Description

Congenital syphilis (CS) is increasing at an alarming rate in Arizona. The state health department has recommended increased screening to include the third trimester, but providers in individual counties are

Congenital syphilis (CS) is increasing at an alarming rate in Arizona. The state health department has recommended increased screening to include the third trimester, but providers in individual counties are not following the recommendation. A literature search and appraisal showed increased screening reduces the incidence of CS and presented interventions to increase screening rates. Furthermore, the literature suggests provider education increases screening rates. However, before education could be completed an understanding of providers current knowledge, attitudes, and practice was needed. Using this information, a gap analysis that was completed in an Arizona county (“the County”) of syphilis screening during pregnancy by prenatal care clinicians will be presented guided by the Knowledge-Attitude-Practice (KAP) Model and the ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-24

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Oral Health Care in Pregnancy

Description

Pregnancy is a specific time in a woman’s life filled with complex changes in health, including the oral cavity. During this time, dental and perinatal care teams can be influential

Pregnancy is a specific time in a woman’s life filled with complex changes in health, including the oral cavity. During this time, dental and perinatal care teams can be influential in helping women initiate and maintain essential habits to improve health and prevent adverse outcomes. There is research evidence that dental providers are reluctant to treat dental problems during pregnancy. Barriers to practice identified by dentists include lack of education, time, financial constraints, and concern for the safety treating pregnant women. Factors that facilitate dental care for pregnant women include purposeful assessment, referrals from prenatal providers, and continuing education for dental team members.

Multiple organizations recommend the treatment of oral health conditions during pregnancy to promote health and prevent pregnancy complications. In order to promote community-based partnerships in a healthcare system, dentists are encouraged to develop an intentional plan to increase collaboration with other members of the women’s healthcare team. Prior to developing a system wide intervention to improve access to dental care during pregnancy, dental team members were surveyed to identify barriers and facilitators which promote or hinder care in their practice. The data acquired will be used to inform the design and implementation of an intervention to specifically meet the needs of patients and providers in that system.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-15

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Reproductive Health Equity: One Key Question© for Women in Recovery

Description

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population.

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC) with recovery programs to improve both access to and quality of RHC. Arizona’s largest SUD recovery program, Crossroads, Inc. recently opened an on-site, integrated primary clinic offering RHC. A one-month pilot demonstration of One Key Question (OKQ), a pregnancy desire screening tool, was implemented with fidelity at Crossroads to identify clients with RHC needs and offer care.

IRB exempt status was obtained through Arizona State University. All female-bodied clients aged 18-49 were screened following routine admission assessments. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim model based on Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing was used to prioritize client autonomy. The client experience of care was measured using an adapted Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning scale. The magnitude of needs and desires were summarized with descriptive statistics. Sixty-three clients were screened with OKQ. Needs were identified in 97% of clients. Of those clients, 98% accepted referrals. Ninety percent of items measuring the client experience of care were rated as “excellent.” OKQ provided an efficient structure for person-centered screening and referral conversations to integrate RHC in a large SUD recovery program with excellent care experiences reported by clients.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Human Papillomavirus Education in Military Service Members

Description

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is associated with several types of cancer and genital warts. No cure exists for those currently infected with HPV,

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is associated with several types of cancer and genital warts. No cure exists for those currently infected with HPV, but a vaccine is available that can prevent the virus and development of cancers associated with HPV. Military servicemembers are at a high risk for contracting HPV; it is one of the most common STIs among active duty service members. The health consequences of HPV can impact a servicemember’s military readiness. The HPV vaccine is not required for military servicemembers, but it is offered free of charge. HPV vaccination rates among military service members remain relatively low.

The purpose of this evidence-based project was to increase the level of knowledge about HPV, improve health beliefs regarding HPV, increase HPV vaccine intention, recommendation, and uptake. Using the Health Belief Model as an organizing framework, a population targeted eight-minute education video on HPV and HPV vaccination was developed. It was implemented at an outpatient military treatment facility located in the southwest United States over a 6-week period, to newly reported service members. Participants included 116 military service members aged 18 to 45. A pretest and posttest questionnaire were used to assess the impact of the intervention. HPV level of knowledge increased significantly from pretest to posttest mean scores were 3.00 to 4.39 respectively (p < .001). HPV vaccine intention increased from 62% to 66% (p = .739). HPV vaccine recommendation increased from 62% to 85% (p < .001).

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-28

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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

Description

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore,

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Increasing Perimenopausal Patient and Clinician Satisfaction with Care Through Use of Shared Decision Making

Description

Vasomotor symptoms (VMS) associated with menopause vary greatly, as do the multitude of available treatment options. It can be difficult for clinicians to manage these symptoms while balancing patient safety

Vasomotor symptoms (VMS) associated with menopause vary greatly, as do the multitude of available treatment options. It can be difficult for clinicians to manage these symptoms while balancing patient safety concerns and preferences. Shared decision-making (SDM) can assist both the provider and patient to navigate the various treatment options, minimizing gaps between their preferences.

To assess the effect of SDM in a nurse-led practice in the Southwest, two nurse practitioners (NP) were invited to use a menopausal decision aid (DA). Women aged 40 to 64 years experiencing VMS were invited to participate in the project. Following a visit with the NP in which the DA was used, patients completed a six question post-intervention survey based on both the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) and SDM-Q-9 surveys. Patients were also asked to complete a telephone interview about the process 1-2 weeks post-intervention. The NP completed a post-intervention survey based on the SDM-Q-Doc to assess clinician satisfaction with the SDM process. Eight patients (mean age, 47.9 years), presenting with a range of 2 to 6 perimenopausal symptoms participated in the project.

All patients (100%) strongly or completely agreed that the clinician precisely explained the advantages & disadvantages of treatment options, helped them understand all the information, reached an agreement on how to proceed with care, and were extremely satisfied or satisfied with their decision and making an informed choice. Both clinicians completely agreed they had come to an agreement on how to proceed, and completely or strongly agreed they helped the patient understand all information. There was a correlation between the use of SDM patient’s age, making an informed choice, and being satisfied with their decision. Incorporating a perimenopausal DA can enhance patient and clinician satisfaction with SDM to understand their treatment options and make an informed menopausal decision.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-03

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Improving Postpartum Follow-Up Through Enhanced Prenatal Education and Concurrent Scheduling with a One-Month Well Baby Visit

Description

Stress of transitioning to parenthood, hormonal fluctuations as well as physical changes, and complications during postpartum could be addressed at the routine postpartum follow-up visit to avoid long-term adverse effects.

Stress of transitioning to parenthood, hormonal fluctuations as well as physical changes, and complications during postpartum could be addressed at the routine postpartum follow-up visit to avoid long-term adverse effects. While emphasis on preconception and prenatal care has increased nationwide, attendance at this important visit is on the decline. The purpose of this project was to investigate how enhanced prenatal education and concurrent scheduling of a well-baby visit at four weeks, instead of the traditional six weeks, could increase adherence to recommended follow-up care at a federally qualified health clinic in the Southwestern United States.

The Theory of Reasoned Action guided the intervention while Rosswurum and Larrabee’s evidence-based practice model was used to develop the project. The pre-existing weekly prenatal education program was enhanced with information regarding the importance of a four-week postpartum follow-up visit. Front desk schedulers were educated to offer same day appointments for the postpartum care visit and one-month well-baby appointment. Data collection took place for three months after implementation of the project and was compared to adherence rates during the three months prior to the intervention. Providers and scheduling staff members participated in a short post-intervention interview. Prenatal education and convenience of concurrent scheduling increased the percentage of adherence to follow-up visits over a three-month period. Providers and clinic staff recommend continuing with the process changes to increase patient’s access to family centered care.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05-01

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Improving Oral Health in Pregnancy

Description

Maintaining good oral health during pregnancy is a significant contributor to healthy pregnancy outcomes. The physiological changes that happen during pregnancy can adversely affect women’s oral health and place her

Maintaining good oral health during pregnancy is a significant contributor to healthy pregnancy outcomes. The physiological changes that happen during pregnancy can adversely affect women’s oral health and place her at risk for pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and preeclampsia. The unborn child’s health can also be affected by premature birth and low birth weight. Although professional organizations have evidence-based practice guidelines for both prenatal and dental providers, the evidence shows a gap between recommendations and practice. An oral health promotion project for pregnant women was implemented in a federally qualified community health center where there was a lack of adherence to the guidelines.

The purpose of this project was to implement established oral health screening guidelines for pregnant women and to increase dental visits among pregnant women. For this project, a two-item maternal oral health-screening tool (MOS) for the prenatal providers was added into the electronic health record to standardize and document oral health screening for pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. After three months of implementation, there was a significant increase in maternal oral health screening and referral. This project may be replicated at any prenatal setting to improve oral health during pregnancy.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-24