Matching Items (3)

153372-Thumbnail Image.png

Preparing teacher candidates for 21st century classrooms: a study of digital citizenship

Description

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University recently adopted a "technology infusion" approach to prepare teacher candidates (TC) to integrate technology into their instruction and meet the International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Teachers (ISTE Standards*T)

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University recently adopted a "technology infusion" approach to prepare teacher candidates (TC) to integrate technology into their instruction and meet the International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Teachers (ISTE Standards*T) by infusing technology integration approaches into methods courses. At the onset of the technology infusion approach, one important ISTE Standard-T was neglected in the curriculum--that is, digital citizenship (DC), i.e., the responsible, legal, and ethical use of technology. To address this problem of practice, a suite of teaching materials and support services was created, the Technology Infusion Support System (TISS), to help instructors effectively teach DC. The suite consisted of four online modules on essential DC topics including copyright/fair use, digital footprint/social media, acceptable use policies, and responsible student behavior. The support component consisted of ongoing just-in-time support from a technology integration specialist, an instructor's guide, and a resource folder.

This mixed methods action research study was conducted to examine: DC instruction by those who used the TISS and the influence of DC instruction on TC's intention to promote and model DC in their future classrooms. With respect to the second objective, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) guided study efforts.

Participants included teacher education faculty members who taught DC in technology-infused methods courses, their students, and the technology infusion specialists who provided ongoing support to instructors throughout the duration of the study. Data gathered included survey data, observations, focus group interviews, instructor interviews, and researcher journal entries. Results suggested the TISS was a useful intervention in a college using a technology infusion approach. Course instructors provided consistent instruction on a topic outside of their area of expertise. Further, there was a significant increase in the students' intention to promote and model DC in their future classrooms. The discussion focuses on explaining: the effectiveness of DC instruction; how instruction in DC changes students' intentions to promote and model DC; and the usefulness of the TPB model in understanding how attitudes toward DC, and perceived behavioral control, i.e., efficacy, influence intention to promote and model DC.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

156251-Thumbnail Image.png

Mindfulness in online courses: a mixed methods research study

Description

ABSTRACT

Community colleges serve an important and pivotal role in society. Neighborhood community colleges attract local students and students who attend community colleges do so for reasons including convenience and cost savings of living near or at home, lower tuition, developmental

ABSTRACT

Community colleges serve an important and pivotal role in society. Neighborhood community colleges attract local students and students who attend community colleges do so for reasons including convenience and cost savings of living near or at home, lower tuition, developmental education courses, vocational training, ESL courses for English Language Learners, and a myriad of student and college resources. Community college faculty and administration work hard to meet the needs of by providing vocational and university transfer programs.

This research study is about the proliferation of online learning and the community college’s struggle to offer online course and keep students enrolled. In an effort to keep up with new educational innovations such as learning online, community colleges offer and fill online courses. However, attrition in online courses is high. Educators continue to innovate and change in areas of course design and online teaching pedagogy, but online learning lacks the physical presence of teacher-student and student-to-student contact and connectedness to the class itself. This study investigates whether it is possible, and effective, for educators to include non-content related curriculum that tries to boost student connectedness to the class, reduce stress, and increase focus so students are more likely to stay enrolled or at least gain more self-efficacy.

I chose mindfulness and its myriad of benefits to incorporate into assignments to enhance the online learning experience and keep students enrolled and passing. This study used one class section of online ENG102 students in a small, urban community college. Within the online course students were introduced mindfulness through periodic opportunities to read about and participate in mindfulness activities.

Results indicate that students still withdrew or stopped participating in the course, even after just a couple weeks and with minimal opportunity to engage in the mindfulness exercises. Students who did stay enrolled and participated in the mindfulness exercises reported that mindfulness did relieve stress and increase focus in general and when approaching course work. Attrition remained high. The implications for online educators indicate that more than just mindfulness is needed to address the attrition problem in online courses.

Keywords: mindfulness, attrition, online learning

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018

161299-Thumbnail Image.png

Digital Connections: Supporting Part-Time Teacher Educators Teaching with Technology Through an Online Community of Practice

Description

To address national technology standards for PK-12 educators and accreditation requirements, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College has developed an approach to preparing its teacher candidates by infusing technological learning experiences in its preparation programs. Faculty members have been expected to

To address national technology standards for PK-12 educators and accreditation requirements, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College has developed an approach to preparing its teacher candidates by infusing technological learning experiences in its preparation programs. Faculty members have been expected to teach with technology, model various levels of technology integration, and provide their students with appropriate learning to develop their digital pedagogy skills. Part-time faculty members have been responsible for teaching courses with these requirements but often lacked access to professional development opportunities and support. The lead technology strategist in the college determined these part-time instructors needed improved strategies for knowledge development, support, and networking. Thus, an online community of practice was created as a potential solution to this problem of practice. This mixed methods study examined how part-time instructors participated in an online community of practice (OCoP) housed in two digital platforms, Canvas and Slack. Elements of the OCoP included learning sessions and resources based upon the Teacher Educator Technology Competencies (TETCs), the Technological Pedagogical Content (TPACK) framework, and elements integral to communities of practice. The investigation included measuring the influence of the OCoP on participants’ technology knowledge, technology skills, technology use, and technological self-efficacy. Participants were part-time faculty members responsible for teaching courses in various teacher preparation programs in the college. Data from the study included survey data, Canvas and Slack analytics describing use, lesson analyses and observational notes, and interviews. Results suggested the OCoP was an effective intervention for the purpose of providing digital connections for part-time faculty to develop professionally with respect to teaching with technology. Participants displayed an increase in TPACK, TETC, and self-efficacy construct scores and demonstrated development in technology knowledge, technology skills, technology use, and technological self-efficacy. The discussion focused on describing the complementarity of the quantitative and qualitative data, explaining the findings in relation to the literature, and presenting limitations, implications for practice and research, lessons learned, and conclusions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021