Matching Items (22)

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Efficient and stable single-doped white OLEDs using a palladium-based phosphorescent excimer

Description

A tetradentate Pd(II) complex, Pd3O3, which exhibits highly efficient excimer emission is synthesized and characterized. Pd3O3 can achieve blue emission despite using phenyl-pyridine emissive ligands which have been a mainstay

A tetradentate Pd(II) complex, Pd3O3, which exhibits highly efficient excimer emission is synthesized and characterized. Pd3O3 can achieve blue emission despite using phenyl-pyridine emissive ligands which have been a mainstay of stable green and red phosphorescent emitter designs, making Pd3O3 a good candidate for stable blue or white OLEDs. Pd3O3 exhibits strong and efficient phosphorescent excimer emission expanding the excimer based white OLEDs beyond the sole class of Pt complexes. Devices of Pd3O3 demonstrate peak external quantum efficiencies as high as 24.2% and power efficiencies of 67.9 Lm per W for warm white devices. Furthermore, Pd3O3 devices in a carefully designed stable structure achieved a device operational lifetime of nearly 3000 h at 1000 cd m[superscript −2] without any outcoupling enhancement while simultaneously achieving peak external quantum efficiencies of 27.3% and power efficiencies over 81 Lm per W.

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Date Created
  • 2017-09-11

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Photocurrent enhancements of organic solar cells by altering dewetting of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles

Description

Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into active layers of organic solar cells is one of the promising light trapping approaches. The size of metal nanoparticles is one of key factors to

Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into active layers of organic solar cells is one of the promising light trapping approaches. The size of metal nanoparticles is one of key factors to strong light trapping, and the size of thermally evaporated metal nanoparticles can be tuned by either post heat treatment or surface modification of substrates. We deposited Ag nanoparticles on ITO by varying nominal thicknesses, and post annealing was carried out to increase their size in radius. PEDOT:PSS was employed onto the ITO substrates as a buffer layer to alter the dewetting behavior of Ag nanoparticles. The size of Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS were dramatically increased by more than three times compared to those on the ITO substrates. Organic solar cells were fabricated on the ITO and PEDOT:PSS coated ITO substrates with incorporation of those Ag nanoparticles, and their performances were compared. The photocurrents of the cells with the active layers on PEDOT:PSS with an optimal choice of the Ag nanoparticles were greatly enhanced whereas the Ag nanoparticles on the ITO substrates did not lead to the photocurrent enhancements. The origin of the photocurrent enhancements with introducing the Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS are discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2015-09-21

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FBXW8-dependent degradation of MRFAP1 in anaphase controls mitotic cell death

Description

Mof4 family associated protein 1 (MRFAP1) is a 14 kDa nuclear protein, which involves in maintaining normal histone modification levels by negatively regulating recruitment of the NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of

Mof4 family associated protein 1 (MRFAP1) is a 14 kDa nuclear protein, which involves in maintaining normal histone modification levels by negatively regulating recruitment of the NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4) histone acetyltransferase complex to chromatin. MRFAP1 has been identified as one of the most up-regulated proteins after NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down- regulated 8) inhibition in multiple human cell lines. However, the biological function of MRFAP1 and the E3 ligase that targets MRFAP1 for destruction remain mysterious. Here we show, by using an immunoprecipitation-based proteomics screen, that MRFAP1 is an interactor of the F-box protein FBXW8. MRFAP1 is degraded by means of the ubiquitin ligase Cul7/FBXW8 during mitotic anaphase-telophase transition and accumulated in mitotic metaphase. Overexpression of FBXW8 increased the polyubiquitination and decreased the stability of MRFAP1, whereas knockdown of FBXW8 prolonged the half-life of MRFAP1. Moreover, forced expression of MRFAP1 in HeLa cells caused growth retardation and genomic instability, leading to severe mitotic cell death. Thus, Cul7/FBXW8-mediated destruction of MRFAP1 is a regulatory component monitoring the anaphase-telophase transition and preventing genomic instability.

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Date Created
  • 2017-10-12

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Ground and excited states of zinc phthalocyanine, zinc tetrabenzoporphyrin, and azaporphyrin analogs using DFT and TDDFT with Franck-Condon analysis

Description

The electronic structure of eight zinc-centered porphyrin macrocyclic molecules are investigated using density functional theory for ground-state properties, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for excited states, and Franck-Condon (FC) analysis

The electronic structure of eight zinc-centered porphyrin macrocyclic molecules are investigated using density functional theory for ground-state properties, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for excited states, and Franck-Condon (FC) analysis for further characterization of the UV-vis spectrum. Symmetry breaking was utilized to find the lowest energy of the excited states for many states in the spectra. To confirm the theoretical modeling, the spectroscopic result from zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) is used to compare to the TDDFT and FC result. After confirmation of the modeling, five more planar molecules are investigated: zinc tetrabenzoporphyrin (ZnTBP), zinc tetrabenzomonoazaporphyrin (ZnTBMAP), zinc tetrabenzocisdiazaporphyrin (ZnTBcisDAP), zinc tetrabenzotransdiazaporphyrin (ZnTBtransDAP), and zinc tetrabenzotriazaporphyrin (ZnTBTrAP). The two latter molecules are then compared to their phenylated sister molecules: zinc monophenyltetrabenzotriazaporphyrin (ZnMPTBTrAP) and zinc diphenyltetrabenzotransdiazaporphyrin (ZnDPTBtransDAP). The spectroscopic results from the synthesis of ZnMPTBTrAP and ZnDPTBtransDAP are then compared to their theoretical models and non-phenylated pairs. While the Franck-Condon results were not as illuminating for every B-band, the Q-band results were successful in all eight molecules, with a considerable amount of spectral analysis in the range of interest between 300 and 750 nm. The π-π [superscript ∗] transitions are evident in the results for all of the Q bands, while satellite vibrations are also visible in the spectra. In particular, this investigation finds that, while ZnPc has a D [subscript 4h] symmetry at ground state, a C [subscript 4v] symmetry is predicted in the excited-state Q band region. The theoretical results for ZnPc found an excitation energy at the Q-band 0-0 transition of 1.88 eV in vacuum, which is in remarkable agreement with published gas-phase spectroscopy, as well as our own results of ZnPc in solution with Tetrahydrofuran that are provided in this paper.

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Date Created
  • 2015-03-07

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Highly Efficient and Stable Narrow-Band Phosphorescent Emitters for OLED Applications

Description

In order to develop organic light-emitting diodes with improved optical properties, a series of phosphorescent complexes exhibiting narrow-band emission spectra are prepared and color tuned to emit efficiently across the

In order to develop organic light-emitting diodes with improved optical properties, a series of phosphorescent complexes exhibiting narrow-band emission spectra are prepared and color tuned to emit efficiently across the whole visible spectrum through a judicious molecular design. Devices employing a green narrow-band phosphorescent emitter are fabricated and demonstrate an internal quantum efficiency of close to unity and impressive device operational lifetimes, estimate at over 70 000 h at a practical luminance of 100 cd m[superscript -2]. Additionally, a deep blue narrow-band emitter is incorporated into a device setting that demonstrates a peak external quantum efficiency of 17.6% and CIE coordinates of (0.14, 0.09).

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Date Created
  • 2015-03-01

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Luminescent cyclometalated platinum and palladium complexes with novel photophysical properties

Description

Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a rapidly emerging technology based on organic thin film semiconductors. Recently, there has been substantial investment in their use in displays. In less than

Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a rapidly emerging technology based on organic thin film semiconductors. Recently, there has been substantial investment in their use in displays. In less than a decade, OLEDs have grown from a promising academic curiosity into a multi-billion dollar global industry. At the heart of an OLED are emissive molecules that generate light in response to electrical stimulation. Ideal emitters are efficient, compatible with existing materials, long lived, and produce light predominantly at useful wavelengths. Developing an understanding of the photophysical processes that dictate the luminescent properties of emissive materials is vital to their continued development. Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 provide an introduction to the topics presented and the laboratory methods used to explore them. Chapter 3 discusses a series of tridentate platinum complexes. A synthetic method utilizing microwave irradiation was explored, as well as a study of the effects ligand structure had on the excited state properties. Results and techniques developed in this endeavor were used as a foundation for the work undertaken in later chapters. Chapter 4 introduces a series of tetradentate platinum complexes that share a phenoxy-pyridyl (popy) motif. The new molecular design improved efficiency through increased rigidity and modification of the excited state properties. This class of platinum complexes were markedly more efficient than those presented in Chapter 3, and devices employing a green emitting complex of the series achieved nearly 100% electron-to-photon conversion efficiency in an OLED device. Chapter 5 adapts the ligand structure developed in Chapter 4 to palladium. The resulting complexes exceed reported efficiencies of palladium complexes by an order of magnitude. This chapter also provides the first report of a palladium complex as an emitter in an OLED device. Chapter 6 discusses the continuation of development efforts to include carbazolyl components in the ligand. These complexes possess interesting luminescent properties including ultra-narrow emission and metal assisted delayed fluorescence (MADF) emission.

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Date Created
  • 2014

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Contact and length dependent effects in single-molecule electronics

Description

Understanding charge transport in single molecules covalently bonded to electrodes is a fundamental goal in the field of molecular electronics. In the past decade, it has become possible to measure

Understanding charge transport in single molecules covalently bonded to electrodes is a fundamental goal in the field of molecular electronics. In the past decade, it has become possible to measure charge transport on the single-molecule level using the STM break junction method. Measurements on the single-molecule level shed light on charge transport phenomena which would otherwise be obfuscated by ensemble measurements of groups of molecules. This thesis will discuss three projects carried out using STM break junction. In the first project, the transition between two different charge transport mechanisms is reported in a set of molecular wires. The shortest wires show highly length dependent and temperature invariant conductance behavior, whereas the longer wires show weakly length dependent and temperature dependent behavior. This trend is consistent with a model whereby conduction occurs by coherent tunneling in the shortest wires and by incoherent hopping in the longer wires. Measurements are supported with calculations and the evolution of the molecular junction during the pulling process is investigated. The second project reports controlling the formation of single-molecule junctions by means of electrochemically reducing two axial-diazonium terminal groups on a molecule, thereby producing direct Au-C covalent bonds in-situ between the molecule and gold electrodes. Step length analysis shows that the molecular junction is significantly more stable, and can be pulled over a longer distance than a comparable junction created with amine anchoring bonds. The stability of the junction is explained by the calculated lower binding energy associated with the direct Au-C bond compared with the Au-N bond. Finally, the third project investigates the role that molecular conformation plays in the conductance of oligothiophene single-molecule junctions. Ethyl substituted oligothiophenes were measured and found to exhibit temperature dependent conductance and transition voltage for molecules with between two and six repeat units. While the molecule with only one repeat unit shows temperature invariant behavior. Density functional theory calculations show that at higher temperatures the oligomers with multiple repeat units assume a more planar conformation, which increases the conjugation length and decreases the effective energy barrier of the junction.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Crystalline and amorphous metallic membranes for hydrogen separation

Description

In the United States, 95% of the industrially produced hydrogen is from natural gas reforming. Membrane-based techniques offer great potential for energy efficient hydrogen separations. Pd77Ag23 is the bench-mark metallic

In the United States, 95% of the industrially produced hydrogen is from natural gas reforming. Membrane-based techniques offer great potential for energy efficient hydrogen separations. Pd77Ag23 is the bench-mark metallic membrane material for hydrogen separation at high temperatures. However, the high cost of palladium limits widespread application. Amorphous metals with lower cost elements are one alternative to replace palladium-based membranes. The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate the potential of binary and ternary amorphous metallic membranes for hydrogen separation. First, as a benchmark, the influence of surface state of Pd77Ag23 crystalline metallic membranes on the hydrogen permeability was investigated. Second, the hydrogen permeability, thermal stability and mechanical properties of Cu-Zr and Ni60Nb35M5 (M=Sn, Ti and Zr) amorphous metallic membranes was evaluated.

Different heat treatments were applied to commercial Pd77Ag23 membranes to promote surface segregation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates that the membrane surface composition changed after heat treatment. The surface area of all membranes increased after heat treatment. The higher the surface Pd/(Pd+Ag) ratio, the higher the hydrogen permeability. Surface carbon removal and surface area increase cannot explain the observed permeability differences.

Previous computational modeling predicted that Cu54Zr46 would have high hydrogen permeability. Amorphous metallic Cu-Zr (Zr=37, 54, 60 at. %) membranes were synthesized and investigated. The surface oxides may result in the lower experimental hydrogen permeability lower than that predicted by the simulations. The permeability decrease indicates that the Cu-Zr alloys crystallized in less than two hours during the test (performed at 300 °C) at temperatures below the glass transition temperature. This original experimental results show that thermal stability of amorphous metallic membranes is critical for hydrogen separation applications.

The hydrogen permeability of Ni60Nb35M5 (M=Sn, Ti and Zr) amorphous metallic membranes was investigated. Nanoindentation shows that the Young’s modulus and hardness increased after hydrogen permeability test. The structure is maintained amorphous after 24 hours of hydrogen permeability testing at 400°C. The maximum hydrogen permeability of three alloys is 10-10 mol m-1 s-1 Pa-0.5. Though these alloys exhibited a slight hydrogen permeability decreased during the test, the amorphous metallic membranes were thermally stable and did not crystalize.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Small molecule organic optoelectronic devices

Description

Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing ‘small molecule’ thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus

Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing ‘small molecule’ thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L’Éclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical, mechanical, and water uptake properties relevant to engineering the next generation of optoelectronic devices.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Theoretical characterization of zinc phthalocyanine and porphyrin analogs for organic solar cell absorption

Description

The absorption spectra of metal-centered phthalocyanines (MPc's) have been investigated since the early 1960's. With improved experimental techniques to characterize this class of molecules the band assignments have advanced. The

The absorption spectra of metal-centered phthalocyanines (MPc's) have been investigated since the early 1960's. With improved experimental techniques to characterize this class of molecules the band assignments have advanced. The characterization remains difficult with historic disagreements. A new push for characterization came with a wave of interest in using these molecules for absorption/donor molecules in organic photovoltaics. The use of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) became of particular interest, in addition to novel research being done for azaporphyrin analogs of ZnPc.

A theoretical approach is taken to research the excited states of these molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Most theoretical results for the first excited state in ZnPc are in only limited agreement with experiment (errors near 0.1 eV or higher). This research investigates ZnPc and 10 additional porphyrin analogs. Excited-state properties are predicted for 8 of these molecules using ab initio computational methods and symmetry breaking for accurate time- dependent self-consistent optimization. Franck-Condon analysis is used to predict the Q-band absorption spectra for all 8 of these molecules. This is the first time that Franck-Condon analysis has been reported in absolute units for any of these molecules. The first excited-state energy for ZnPc is found to be the closest to experiment thus far using a range-separated meta-GGA hybrid functional. The theoretical results are used to find a trend in the novel design of new porphyrin analog molecules.

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Date Created
  • 2014