Matching Items (5)

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Native phasing of x-ray free-electron laser data for a G protein–coupled receptor

Description

Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) takes advantage of extremely bright and ultrashort pulses produced by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), allowing for the collection of high-resolution diffraction intensities from micrometer-sized crystals at

Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) takes advantage of extremely bright and ultrashort pulses produced by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), allowing for the collection of high-resolution diffraction intensities from micrometer-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal radiation damage, using the principle of “diffraction-before-destruction.” However, de novo structure factor phase determination using XFELs has been difficult so far. We demonstrate the ability to solve the crystallographic phase problem for SFX data collected with an XFEL using the anomalous signal from native sulfur atoms, leading to a bias-free room temperature structure of the human A[subscript 2A] adenosine receptor at 1.9 Å resolution. The advancement was made possible by recent improvements in SFX data analysis and the design of injectors and delivery media for streaming hydrated microcrystals. This general method should accelerate structural studies of novel difficult-to-crystallize macromolecules and their complexes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-09-23

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Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods

Description

We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo

We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-06-12

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The room temperature crystal structure of a bacterial phytochrome determined by serial femtosecond crystallography

Description

Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptors that control light responses of plants, fungi and bacteria. A sequence of structural changes, which is not yet fully understood, leads to activation of

Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptors that control light responses of plants, fungi and bacteria. A sequence of structural changes, which is not yet fully understood, leads to activation of an output domain. Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can potentially shine light on these conformational changes. Here we report the room temperature crystal structure of the chromophore-binding domains of the Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure was obtained by serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography from microcrystals at an X-ray free electron laser. We find overall good agreement compared to a crystal structure at 1.35 Å resolution derived from conventional crystallography at cryogenic temperatures, which we also report here. The thioether linkage between chromophore and protein is subject to positional ambiguity at the synchrotron, but is fully resolved with SFX. The study paves the way for time-resolved structural investigations of the phytochrome photocycle with time-resolved SFX.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-10-19

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Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

Description

Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of

Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-08-22

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Serial crystallography: beyond Monte Carlo data analysis

Description

The superior brightness and ultra short pulse duration of X-ray free electron laser

(XFEL) allows it to outrun radiation damage in coherent diffractive imaging since elastic scattering terminates before photoelectron cascades

The superior brightness and ultra short pulse duration of X-ray free electron laser

(XFEL) allows it to outrun radiation damage in coherent diffractive imaging since elastic scattering terminates before photoelectron cascades commences. This “diffract-before-destroy” feature of XFEL opened up new opportunities for biological macromolecule imaging and structure studies by breaking the limit to spatial resolution imposed by the maximum dose that is allowed before radiation damage. However, data collection in serial femto-second crystallography (SFX) using XFEL is affected by a bunch of stochastic factors, which pose great challenges to the data analysis in SFX. These stochastic factors include crystal size, shape, random orientation, X-ray photon flux, position and energy spectrum. Monte-Carlo integration proves effective and successful in extracting the structure factors by merging all diffraction patterns given that the data set is sufficiently large to average out all stochastic factors. However, this approach typically requires hundreds of thousands of patterns collected from experiments. This dissertation explores both experimental and algorithmic methods to eliminate or reduce the effect of stochastic factors in data acquisition and analysis. Coherent convergent X-ray beam diffraction (CCB) is discussed for possibilities of obtaining single-shot angular-integrated rocking curves. It is also shown the interference between Bragg disks helps ab-initio phasing. Two-color diffraction scheme is proposed for time-resolved studies and general data collection strategies are discussed based on error metrics. A new auto-indexing algorithm for sparse patterns is developed and demonstrated for both simulated and experimental data. Statistics show that indexing rate is increased by 3 times for I3C data set collected from beam time LJ69 at Linac coherent light source (LCLS). Finally, dynamical inversion from electron diffraction is explored as an alternative approach for structure determination.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016