Matching Items (26)

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All About The Beets - Cookbook

Description

Beets have a history of bad reputation for not having the most appetizing qualities compared to other vegetables. Despite the nutritional and health benefits of Beta vulgaris rubra (commonly red

Beets have a history of bad reputation for not having the most appetizing qualities compared to other vegetables. Despite the nutritional and health benefits of Beta vulgaris rubra (commonly red beetroot or red beets) the potential of this vegetable has yet to be glorified as compared to i.e. Brassica oleracea var. sabellica (kale), or Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa). When considering this root vegetable as a vehicle for providing your body with a source of dietary nitrate, Beta vulgaris rubra can be classified as a functional food. This work dives deeper into the function of Nitric Oxide (NO) within the human body, and explains the potential benefits of consuming red beets. Followed is a proposal for a cookbook focused on dishes containing this vegetable, as well as a sample of recipes varying from breakfast to dinner to dessert. The amount of nitrate provided by each serving of any of the dishes has not been established, and it is rather a creative attempt to shine positive light on this functional food.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Importance and Integration of Dietary Fiber

Description

The concept of this thesis is the importance of dietary fiber and how it can be further integrated into the American diet. The adequate intake (AI) of fiber for men

The concept of this thesis is the importance of dietary fiber and how it can be further integrated into the American diet. The adequate intake (AI) of fiber for men and women is thirty-eight and twenty-five grams respectively. I was inspired to focus my research on increasing fiber intake because the typical American consumes fifteen grams of dietary fiber which is well below the AI. The purpose of this project was to inform individuals on the importance of dietary fiber, but also to create and compile recipes which would make it easy for people to increase their intake of dietary fiber. There are two parts to this project: a literature review and a cookbook. The literature review discusses the health benefits of fiber as to how its properties of viscosity and fermentability allow for weight loss, decrease appetite and energy intake, decrease postprandial insulin and glucose levels, impact gut health, lower blood lipid levels in order to protect against atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, decrease inflammation, and reduce levels of inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. The cookbook provides the ideas for integrating high fiber foods into one's diet. There are three different categories in the cookbook: snacks, lunch and dinner, and breakfast. The snacks and breakfast provide around five grams of fiber per serving, if not more, whereas the lunch and dinner options provide around fifteen grams in a meal. Not only are these recipes high in fiber, but they are also nutrient dense, meaning they provide more than just the listed health benefits in the literature review. Having these recipes and increasing awareness of the benefits which they contain will help individuals to meet the AI of fiber while still enjoying delicious meals.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

Development and Evaluation of a Nutritious Menu for Lions Camp Tatiyee: An Entrepreneurial Endeavor in Designing a Nutrition Program for Individuals with Special Needs

Description

The intention of this thesis is to create a cookbook to best serve the needs of all who attend Lions Camp Tatiyee. The cookbook was used as a resource in

The intention of this thesis is to create a cookbook to best serve the needs of all who attend Lions Camp Tatiyee. The cookbook was used as a resource in providing the Lions Camp Tatiyee Kitchen staff with simple, healthy recipes to use in the implementation of their summer menu. This thesis discusses the culmination of the idea, the process of execution, current research concerning the relationship between nutrition and health concerns related to special needs, and achievements and further advancements of my creative project.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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An Examination of Fish Oil on Blood Clotting Times in Blood Types A and O

Description

Background. Research suggests that fish oil can be used as an intervention to increase clotting times and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
Objective. The purpose of this study

Background. Research suggests that fish oil can be used as an intervention to increase clotting times and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
Objective. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of fish oil supplementation on blood coagulation parameters in adults with blood type A (BTA) compared to blood type O (BTO) over an eight-week intervention.
Design. The study was a randomized, double-blind dietary intervention using healthy adults with blood types A or O. A total of 18 participants completed the study. Subjects were randomized into two groups: an experimental group (fish oil) made up of 7 BTO and 4 BTA adults, and a control group (coconut oil) made up of 4 BTO and 3 BTA adults. Non-fasting blood was drawn and analyzed for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and international normalized ratio (INR) at weeks 0 and 8. A food frequency questionnaire was completed at week 0, and anthropometric data collected at weeks 0 and 8.
Results. Baseline PTT results differed significantly between blood types, 28.1±1.4 seconds and 29.7±1.3 seconds for BTA and BTO respectively (p<0.05). Physical activity differed significantly between the experimental and control group at baseline, 53.9±26.8 METS and 86.0±41.9 METS, respectively (p<0.05). In the Fish oil group, prothrombin time increased for BTA vs. BTO, 0.18±0.29 seconds vs -0.11±0.31 seconds respectively (p<0.10indicating a statistical trend). There were no other differences between groups for the other outcome variables.
Conclusion. Fish oil supplementation prolonged clotting time in BTA adults and may be a useful strategy in this population for reducing cardiovascular disease risk. More research is needed to verify and expand these results.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Antiglycemic Properties of Mustard, a Condiment High in Vinegar

Description

According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. and rates are continuing to rise nationally and internationally. Chronically elevated blood glucose levels can

According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. and rates are continuing to rise nationally and internationally. Chronically elevated blood glucose levels can lead to type 2 diabetes and other complications. Medications can be used to treat diabetes, but often have side effects. Lifestyle and diet modifications can be just as effective as medications in helping to improve glycemic control, and prevent diabetes or improve the condition in those who have it. Studies have demonstrated that consuming vinegar with carbohydrates can positively impact postprandial glycemia in diabetic and healthy individuals. Continuous vinegar intake with meals may even reduce fasting blood glucose levels. Since vinegar is a primary ingredient in mustard, the purpose of this study was to determine if mustard consumption with a carbohydrate-rich meal (bagel and fruit juice) had an effect on the postprandial blood glucose levels of subjects. The results showed that mustard improved glycemia by 17% when subjects consumed the meal with mustard as opposed to the control. A wide variety of vinegars exists. The defining ingredient in all vinegars is acetic acid, behind the improvement in glycemic response observed with vinegar ingestion. Vinegar-containing foods range from mustard, to vinaigrette dressings, to pickled foods. The benefits of vinegar ingestion with carbohydrates are dose-dependent, meaning that adding even small amounts to meals can help. Making a conscious effort to incorporate these foods into meals, in addition to an overall healthy lifestyle, could provide an additional tool for diabetics and nondiabetics alike to consume carbohydrates in a healthier manner.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Kids in the Kitchen: A Cookbook for Little Chefs

Description

Cases of diet-related illnesses are some of the most common illnesses we witness today. From heart disease to type 2 diabetes, from obesity to hypertension, many of these diseases are

Cases of diet-related illnesses are some of the most common illnesses we witness today. From heart disease to type 2 diabetes, from obesity to hypertension, many of these diseases are easily prevented by lifestyle changes. However, it is much easier to instill healthy habits in a population from the start rather than trying to change habits later, even if one's health depends on it. A pastime as simple as cooking allows us to take responsibility for our own health by (quite literally) taking it into our own hands. This is why I chose to write a cookbook for my honor's thesis. More importantly, this is why I chose to write a cookbook geared towards young children. My target audience is 8-11 years old because that's when I first started to cook, and it's a habit that has kept me well to this day. Within this cookbook, readers will find over 30 (mostly) healthy recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and desserts, complete with written instructions and photographs to aid with meal preparation. My hope is that, during my career, I will be able to publish this book and distribute it to children who might not have an interest in cooking, but can learn basic cooking skills from my book. If kids get working in the kitchen, they might keep cooking as they grow older, which will help them keep control of their health for the better.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Paleo Nutrition: Investigating Possible Consequences of Fad Dieting

Description

The aim of this paper is to investigate a few of the primary pillars of the Paleo diet for evidence to either support or refute their efficacy and safety such

The aim of this paper is to investigate a few of the primary pillars of the Paleo diet for evidence to either support or refute their efficacy and safety such that a more educated decision can be made by lay-persons who are wishing to make improvements in their overall health via dieting. To accomplish this goal a basic overview of The Paleo Diet (also known to some as the Paleolithic Nutrition Movement) is given based on the writings of Dr. Loren Cordain in his book The Paleo Diet. Next, analyses of a few of the basic characteristics of the diet are presented based on an in-depth literature review that was performed using PubMed (Medline), Cochrane and Google Scholar databases until March of 2015. The findings of this investigation raise concerns with respect to the safety of some of the main principles of the diet such as its high protein, low carbohydrate content that is relies heavily on the consumption of red meat. The current literature on what the diet of the people of the Paleolithic era may have consisted of is also presented in order to shed light on the origins of the diet and see how closely the diet prescribed The Paleo Diet meshes with the most current data on the topic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Eating in the absence of hunger in college students

Description

The body is capable of regulating hunger in several ways. Some of these hunger regulation methods are innate, such as genetics, and some, such as the responses to stress and

The body is capable of regulating hunger in several ways. Some of these hunger regulation methods are innate, such as genetics, and some, such as the responses to stress and to the smell of food, are innate but can be affected by body conditions such as BMI and physical activity. Further, some hunger regulation methods stem from learned behaviors originating from cultural pressures or parenting styles. These latter regulation methods for hunger can be grouped into the categories: emotion, environment, and physical. The factors that regulate hunger can also influence the incidence of disordered eating, such as eating in the absence of hunger (EAH). Eating in the absence of hunger can occur in one of two scenarios, continuous EAH or beginning EAH. College students are at a particularly high risk for EAH and weight gain due to stress, social pressures, and the constant availability of energy dense and nutrient poor food options. The purpose of this study is to validate a modified EAH-C survey in college students and to discover which of the three latent factors (emotion, environment, physical) best predicts continual and beginning EAH. To do so, a modified EAH-C survey, with additional demographic components, was administered to students at a major southwest university. This survey contained two questions, one each for continuing and beginning EAH, regarding 14 factors related to emotional, physical, or environmental reasons that may trigger EAH. The results from this study revealed that the continual and beginning EAH surveys displayed good internal consistency reliability. We found that for beginning and continuing EAH, although emotion is the strongest predictor of EAH, all three latent factors are significant predictors of EAH. In addition, we found that environmental factors had the greatest influence on an individual's likelihood to continue to eat in the absence of hunger. Due to statistical abnormalities and differing numbers of factors in each category, we were unable to determine which of the three factors exerted the greatest influence on an individual's likelihood to begin eating in the absence of hunger. These results can be utilized to develop educational tools aimed at reducing EAH in college students, and ultimately reducing the likelihood for unhealthy weight gain and health complications related to obesity.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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The effects of omega 3 supplementation on markers of obesity and endothelial function in healthy subjects

Description

ABSTRACT The hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and energy balance, while nitric oxide (NO) produced in the blood vessels is beneficial for preventing disease-induced impaired vasodilation

ABSTRACT The hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and energy balance, while nitric oxide (NO) produced in the blood vessels is beneficial for preventing disease-induced impaired vasodilation and hypertension. Elevations in the free radical superoxide can result in impaired vasodilation through scavenging of NO. Omega 3 is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is beneficial at reducing body weight and in lowering many cardiovascular risk factors like atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to examine the change in plasma concentrations of leptin, nitric oxide, and the antioxidant superoxide dismutase in addition to examining the association between leptin and NO in healthy normal weight adult female subjects before and following omega 3 intakes. Participants were randomly assigned to either a fish oil group (600 mg per day) or a control group (1000 mg of coconut oil per day) for 8 weeks. Results showed no significant difference in the percent change of leptin over the 8 week supplementation period for either group (15.3±31.9 for fish oil group, 7.83±27 for control group; p=0.763). The percent change in NO was similarly not significantly altered in either group (-1.97±22 decline in fish oil group, 11.8±53.9 in control group; p=0.960). Likewise, the percent change in superoxide dismutase for each group was not significant following 8 weeks of supplementation (fish oil group: 11.94±20.94; control group: 11.8±53.9; p=0.362). The Pearson correlation co-efficient comparing the percent change of both leptin and NO was r2= -0.251 demonstrating a mildly negative, albeit insignificant, relationship between these factors. Together, these findings suggest that daily supplementation with 600 mg omega 3 in healthy females is not beneficial for improving these cardiovascular risk markers. Future studies in this area should include male subjects as well as overweight subjects with larger doses of fish oil that are equivalent to three or more servings per week. The importance of gender cannot be underestimated since estrogen has protective effects in the vasculature of females that may have masked any further protective effects of the fish oil. In addition, overweight individuals are often leptin-resistant and develop impaired vasodilation resulting from superoxide-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide. Therefore, the reported antioxidant and weight loss properties of omega 3 supplementation may greatly benefit overweight individuals.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Pilot Study: The Synergistic Effect of Almond Consumption and Aerobic Activity on the Reduction of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Sedentary Adults

Description

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the world, responsible for 17.3 million deaths annually. Aerobic activity and almond ingestion have a cardio-protective effect against cardiovascular disease, however,

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the world, responsible for 17.3 million deaths annually. Aerobic activity and almond ingestion have a cardio-protective effect against cardiovascular disease, however, the synergistic effect of both interventions is not known. This 8-week randomized, parallel, two-arm study examined the combined effect of daily almond ingestion (2.5 ounces) and brisk walking (10,000 steps per day) compared to ingestion of an isocaloric placebo (4 Tbsp cookie butter) and brisk walking (10,000 steps per day) in sedentary adults on various markers of cardiovascular health. The additive effect of the daily walking intervention with almond consumption resulted in significant differences in total cholesterol with a -11.0 ± 10.5 and +3.3 ± 15.8 mg/dL (p=0.043) change in the ALM and CON group respectively and LDL with a -11.5 ± 7.5 and +0.5 ± 13.7 mg/dL (p=0.025) change in the ALM and CON group respectively. There was a trend for TBARS to decrease in the ALM group versus the CON group (-0.2 ± 0.8 and +0.3 ± 0.6 nmol MDA/mL (p=0.099) respectively) with a large effect size of 0.304 but this did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant differences seen in markers of other plasma lipid profile measures, plasma inflammatory cytokines, or blood pressure regulation. Results suggest that the simple, cost-effective, and accessible intervention of daily brisk walking and almond consumption is an effective strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in sedentary adults through improvements in cholesterol. This represents a pilot study due to the small sample size, therefore, additional studies are needed to determine the impact and mechanisms of this synergistic effect.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017