Matching Items (5)

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Advancing Second Language Proficiency of Monolinguals through a Comparative Analysis of Heritage Speakers and Second Language Learners.

Description

The importance of second language learning in today’s ever-increasing globalized world is becoming ever more paramount. Despite seeming trends which indicate aversion to globalization, the international phenomenon which describes the connection made between peoples and cultures, will only increase its

The importance of second language learning in today’s ever-increasing globalized world is becoming ever more paramount. Despite seeming trends which indicate aversion to globalization, the international phenomenon which describes the connection made between peoples and cultures, will only increase its influence in coming years. With the advances globalization has made, it is becoming more important to learn and study foreign languages in order to keep abreast of this trend and not be left behind by globalization. Why electronic translation is not so viable in the long run (at least currently) is that culture and syntax are not things which can be simply ascertained via mediums such as application use. Due to the fact that advanced language proficiency is considered to be an integral piece towards stronger sentiments of “integration” (i.e. Syrian refugees integrating into EU and US) it is of more importance that increasing second language proficiency receives the adequate study and implementation to reflect a more cohesive globalized world. Accompanying this necessity is the simple fact that adult second language learners often struggle to overcome difficulty to the challenging yet rewarding task of learning and eventually mastering a second language.

To truly understand the difficulty some adult second language learners have with learning a second language it can be helpful to compare second language acquisition to how one naturally, and seemingly effortlessly in many cases, acquires their native language. How can a comparative analysis of how native speakers and adult second language learners each learn their first and second language respectively be successfully converted to a specific means of assisting adult second language learners achieve the highest level of possible fluency? In order to more accurately propose a viable solution to the overarching question, the following three questions have been proposed as a means to springboard into better understanding the nature of the main topic.
The points to consider while analyzing the main question throughout this analysis are as follows: How would it be best for an adult second language learner to achieve the same level off proficiency as a native speaker of a given language whom has been exposed to all of its intricacies since birth? At what point exactly is someone considered to have the same level of proficiency which a native speaker of a given language would have and how does that differ from being a heritage speaker? With the final supporting question being: What type of learning would be best suited in helping a heritage speaker (someone who learns a language in the home by virtue of their heritage) or adult second language learner to become highly proficient in a second language?
In order to propose a wide variety of integration between these questions with the conjoined purpose of answering the inquiry of this thesis, many different sources supporting each of the above questions will contain certain overlap, providing a clear basis for constructing a tri-fold argument in answering the thesis question as acutely as possible. In regards to the first question, the question of “proficiency” will be a subsection committed to understanding the nature of how language proficiency works and at what point (if ever) one can ever be considered “highly proficient” in a second language.

All three exploratory questions are compatible with a theory known as Critical Period Theory, a theory in linguistics proposed by Montreal neurologist Wilder Penfield, which states, “There is a critical age, before puberty, that one must learn language. If one has not learned to speak before puberty it is much more difficult, and sometimes impossible, to learn language and speak in a meaningful way.” The overlap which this method binds to Universal Grammar is a rather close-knit relationship. Research composed by certain linguists suggest that “children are born with a certain universal grammar wired into their brains.” This will be compared and cross-examined to a higher degree in a later section of the paper.

The importance of Universal Grammar in relation to Critical Period Theory cannot be overstated.  Universal Grammar in relation to the second language Critical Period Theory will help explain at which point, someone is considered to be a “native speaker” of a given language. The third question posed of how would it be best for heritage and second language learners to increase their proficiency in a second language really touches on both of these theories in regards to at which age someone is exposed to a specific language in addition to how Universal Grammar affects the development of second language acquisition. In the realm of perpetually working towards mitigating an answer to this analysis’s thesis, the connecting thread or “roter Faden”, as it is said in German, will be the integrative domain the above questions will have on arriving to a clearer understanding of the nature of how a comparative analysis of second language learners and mother-tongue speakers can expedite the language learning process of second language learners, using techniques of native speakers which they inherently pick-up.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2018-12

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The Effects of German Language Experience and Cultural Exposure on Perception of the German Culture

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to analyze how the cultural conceptions that American Arizona State University (ASU) students have of Germany change with experience. More specifically, this thesis answers how these cultural conceptions change after students learn the German

The purpose of this thesis is to analyze how the cultural conceptions that American Arizona State University (ASU) students have of Germany change with experience. More specifically, this thesis answers how these cultural conceptions change after students learn the German language or visit the country. In order to accomplish this, three representative groups of people with varying levels of experience were interviewed. Structurally speaking, the thesis first provides background information why the topic was chosen and how a survey was designed to conduct a study on the topic. Next, the data from the study is presented in its raw form as well as in organized charts and graphs. A set of observations that were taken from the data will be explained, supported, and then analyzed. The thesis then concludes with a discussion of how the study could be improved or changed to further analyze the topic.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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A Translation of Adolf Bach's "Sprache und Nation"

Description

The decade of the 1930s was a tumultuous time for the world at large, but even more so in Germany. With the ascension to power of the National Socialist German Worker's Party (NSDAP) much of German academia was purged, and

The decade of the 1930s was a tumultuous time for the world at large, but even more so in Germany. With the ascension to power of the National Socialist German Worker's Party (NSDAP) much of German academia was purged, and the remainder was under significant strain to present ideas consistent with nationalist ideology. It was during this period, in 1938, that linguist professor Adolf Bach published his chapter "Sprache und Nation" as the conclusion to the book Geschichte der Deutschen Sprache. It is this chapter which the following thesis seeks to translate and analyze briefly, for the purpose of gaining further insight into the landscape of scholarly work in linguistics during the period. The chapter summarizes the content of the book, providing a brief history of the unification of the German language before launching into a discussion of the merits of the German language and race. Bach contends that the unique strength of the German language and people is deserving of protection from outside influence and at the close of his chapter calls for a struggle for the existence and purity of the people.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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A Comparison of Incidental and Intentional Teaching Strategies for Second Language Acquisition

Description

This thesis discusses second language acquisition and the theories behind various teaching methods implemented to facilitate incidental language acquisition as opposed to intellectual language learning. Through observations and data collected in two GER 101 classes at Arizona State University, I

This thesis discusses second language acquisition and the theories behind various teaching methods implemented to facilitate incidental language acquisition as opposed to intellectual language learning. Through observations and data collected in two GER 101 classes at Arizona State University, I will analyze and compare the success of using a traditional lecture that relies on exposition to promote language learning to using a modern interaction strategy that relies on the students communicating in the target language to learn an aspect of German grammar as an acquisition-based method.

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Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Disneyfication: The role of the Walt Disney Company® as modern fairy tale collectors

Description

Fairy tales have been around for centuries, always changing and adapting along with the cultures in which they're recreated. And yet, when Disney fairy tales are brought into the conversation, the response from critics and scholars is almost always a

Fairy tales have been around for centuries, always changing and adapting along with the cultures in which they're recreated. And yet, when Disney fairy tales are brought into the conversation, the response from critics and scholars is almost always a negative one. Through analysis of famous fairy tale collectors Giambattista Basile, Charles Perrault, and the Brothers Grimm, I highlight how sociopolitical conditions affect the way fairy tales change over time. I then dive into Walt Disney and The Walt Disney Company© to explore the influences that helped to shape their versions of the tales. To show these effects more specifically, I analyze each of the above-mentioned collectors' versions of Cinderella and how the different themes in each version of the tale were reflective of the societal and personal beliefs of the collector who wrote it. Through this, I hope to argue that the Disney versions of the tales have gone through the same "sanitization" process as every other version of the tale and that the changes they made were necessary for the preservation and continued popularity of the genre.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-12