Matching Items (9)

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The Effects of Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions on Innovation

Description

In a global environment, innovation has become especially important to remain competitive in the market. Many factors affect the rate of innovation. Specifically, national culture significantly impacts a nation's ability

In a global environment, innovation has become especially important to remain competitive in the market. Many factors affect the rate of innovation. Specifically, national culture significantly impacts a nation's ability to innovate. Using Hofstede's cultural dimensions [Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance], this research attempts to explain a culture's effects on innovation. Based on data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), countries showing higher levels of innovation correlate with better quality of life and profitability amongst corporations in countries. Organizations can use the correlations identified between each of Hofstede's frameworks to improve company culture and increase rates of innovation. A low Power Distance and Uncertainty Avoidance coupled with an Individualistic culture had the largest positive effect on innovation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Effects of Cross-Cultural Experiences: A Study of Power Distance and Gender Differences in Cultural Adjustment

Description

Globalization has necessitated cross-cultural communication among groups and individuals alike, often beginning with management. This project considers how the degree of Power Distance, one of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, may change

Globalization has necessitated cross-cultural communication among groups and individuals alike, often beginning with management. This project considers how the degree of Power Distance, one of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, may change over time as a result of exposure to different, and often opposing, cultural values. We conducted two surveys 12 weeks apart collecting an initial sample of 317 and retaining a secondary sample of 142. We gathered data on demographics, education, on-campus involvement, cultural dimensions, and levels of comfort with different cultures. Through data analysis we found that as a result of exposure to different cultural values, cultural groups adjust their own views on Power Distance. Specifically, we found that the Anglo cultural group and the international cultural subgroup that had been living in the U.S. for less than 10 years trended towards each other on levels of Power Distance. We also found that international female students adjusted to new cultural surroundings faster than their male counterparts. These discoveries have led us to conclusions regarding the influence of awareness of other cultural values through international exposure, specifically that of Power Distance, as well as male versus female differences in cultural adjustment, and how differing views might trend towards each other with recurrent interaction.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Culture, Gender, and Age: Creating Companies for the 21st Century

Description

The purpose of this research is to define significant explanatory factors behind differences in work preferences across country of origin, gender, and generation. We conducted a survey through Qualtrics, which

The purpose of this research is to define significant explanatory factors behind differences in work preferences across country of origin, gender, and generation. We conducted a survey through Qualtrics, which consisted of 45 questions. The survey was administered to men and women who were U.S. citizens and non-US citizens and who were from two pre-defined generational groups: Generation X and Generation Z. Furthermore, the questions were intended to determine different work preferences in Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, Uncertainty Avoidance), McClelland's Motivational Theory, Alpha/Beta Work Values, and Leadership Traits from the GLOBE study. We also had the opportunity to travel to Tokyo, Japan in December 2016 to gather qualitative research data regarding individuals' opinions and experiences in cultural and gender differences in the workplace. We were able to support hypotheses regarding Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions, Alpha and Beta Values, and Leadership Traits specifically across our gender and generational cohorts. Findings from the study indicate significant variations between all three cohorts. Our literature and hypotheses review, methodology, limitations, practical implications in addition to future research to expand our study will be discussed within this text. We hope to provide context and insight into how businesses of the twenty-first century can be inclusive, fair, and profitable amidst a changing workforce and a host of global factors that are constantly refining the multinational company.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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AGENCY THEORY VS. INFORMATION MEASUREMENT THEORY: A CASE STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INCENTIVES IN THE WORKPLACE

Description

This study analyzes the impact of incentive programs on performance. Agency theory and Information Measurement theory are used to hypothesize about the impact of incentives upon performance. Empirical evidence from

This study analyzes the impact of incentive programs on performance. Agency theory and Information Measurement theory are used to hypothesize about the impact of incentives upon performance. Empirical evidence from the case study shows that incentives are ineffective at increasing performance, but the statistical significance of the data is too low to generalize the findings beyond that of short term cold call sales. Several avenues for continued research are suggested.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Gender Inequality in the Venture Capital Industry

Description

This project examines the secretive world of the Venture Capital Industry specifically focusing on the ideology of gender inequality. Through research it has been found that females within the industry

This project examines the secretive world of the Venture Capital Industry specifically focusing on the ideology of gender inequality. Through research it has been found that females within the industry at the partnership level have actually decreased. By completing a literature review, we found that there were several biases and stereotypes that are prevalent within the industry and could be contributing factors for the decreasing participation. Following our literature review, we focused on a sample of 100 from the LPJ Index, and gathered data on all individuals listed, those at the partnership level and all other individuals within the industry. Through analyzing our data we found that female participation at the partner level is low and more importantly that 68% of firms do not even have a female partner in their ranks. We found that male and female partners have relatively the same education and the same areas of interest, which should suggest that they are on the same playing field, which is clearly not represented in the partnership composition, where males are dominating the industry. These findings lend credence to some of the deep rooted stereotypes that are facing females in the Venture Capital Industry and could explain why there are not many opportunities for them. Through future research and participation from firms to actively help increase the opportunities for women, the gender inequality that is facing the Venture Capital Industry can begin to narrow.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Value creation of private equity funds: practices in China

Description

Based on multiple case studies of the transactions in China by private equity funds, this paper attempts to explore the value-creation capabilities of private equity funds at the transaction/deal level.

Based on multiple case studies of the transactions in China by private equity funds, this paper attempts to explore the value-creation capabilities of private equity funds at the transaction/deal level.

Previous studies on financial performance of PE funds utilized data collected from publically traded companies in European/US markets. By measuring financial performance of both “pre- and post-transactions,” these studies researched two questions: 1) Do buyout funds create value? 2) If they do, what are the sources of value creation? In general, studies conclude that private equity/buyout funds do create value at both the deal level and investor level. They also identified four possible sources of such value creation: 1) undervaluation, 2) leverage effect, 3) better governance, and 4) operational improvement.

However, relatively little is known about the process of value creation. In this study, I attempt to fill that gap, revealing the “secret recipe” of value creation.

By carefully looking into the process of value creation, this study suggests five propositions covering capabilities at 1) deal selection/screening, 2) deal structuring, 3) operational improvement, 4) investment exit, and 5) Top Management Team (TMT). These capabilities at private equity/buyout funds are critical factors for value creation. In a thorough review of the value-creation process, this paper hopes to:

1) Share real-life experiences and lessons learned on private equity transactions in China as a developing economy.

2) Reveal the process of deal/transaction to observe measures taken place within deal/transaction for value creation.

3) Show how well-executed strategies and capabilities in deal selection/screening, deal structuring, operational improvement, and investment exit can still create value for private equity firms without financial leverage.

4) Share the experience of State-Owned Enterprises (SOE) reform participated in by private equity firms in China. This could provide valuable information for policy makers in China.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Research of Dynamic Relationship between the Price of Alternative Investment Products and Macro-Economy

Description

This paper studies the dynamic relationship between the pricing of Alternative Asset Management products and macroeconomic variables. It does so using an index of Alternative Asset Management products, employing a

This paper studies the dynamic relationship between the pricing of Alternative Asset Management products and macroeconomic variables. It does so using an index of Alternative Asset Management products, employing a VAR framework and examining the implied impulse response functions. I find a bivariate causal relation between the expected rate of return on Alternative Asset Management products and the growth rate of industrial value added. I also find that the CPI, the yield on one-year national debt, the weighted average yield of bond repurchases in interbank bond market, and the one-year loan interest rate can influence the expected return rate of Alternative Asset Management products. An analysis of the variance decomposition suggests that macroeconomic variables have a different impacts on forecast errors variance.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Activist Investors and Firm Performance Empirical Evidence From Chinese A Share Market

Description

Shareholder Activism is a mechanism by which investors who hold a significant but

non-majority percentage of a company’s stock, exercise their voting rights, participate in

corporate governance and influence operational decisions of

Shareholder Activism is a mechanism by which investors who hold a significant but

non-majority percentage of a company’s stock, exercise their voting rights, participate in

corporate governance and influence operational decisions of target companies. The

purpose is improve corporate governance, increase firm performance and boost share

-holders’ returns. Existing studies of shareholder activism, based largely in mature

capital markets like the US, come to different conclusions regarding its impact on firm

performance.

In this paper, I collect data on shareholder activism events in the China A Share

market between 2006 and 2016. The sample includes 60 companies targeted by 42

activist investors over this period. I find that institutional investors, typically industrial

capital and private funds, playing an increasingly important role in corporate governance

of Chinese listed companies through activism. The disclosure of the holdings of activists

results in large gains in the target firm. I also find subsequent improvements in long

-term operational performance of target firms. Activist investors in China focus on

smaller targets and those characterized by higher agency costs and lower operating

performance. Activists appear to be largely concerned with improvements in business

strategy and M&A activity. Non-hostile behavior is more likely to be related to successful

activism in China. In addition to statistical evidence, I present case studies of the

“BaoWan dispute” and the activist investment of Butterfly Capital in two firms,

“Guonong” and “Xiuqiang”. The case studies highlight the mechanism employed by these

firms to influence performance.

I conclude with policy recommendations and direction for further research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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The Impacts on Corporate Performance of the Banking Industry’s Compensation & Incentive Policy

Description

Ever since the registration of private banks was deregulated in Taiwan in 1991, the sector has suffered significant decline in profitability. Facing such a dynamic sector yet vital to domestic

Ever since the registration of private banks was deregulated in Taiwan in 1991, the sector has suffered significant decline in profitability. Facing such a dynamic sector yet vital to domestic economy, what should the banks do to successfully improve their competiveness? As external changes are often unpredictable, the exploration and buildup of internal resources is a critical approach. This article focuses on how to effectively manage internal competition so as to upgrade business performance and accomplish organizational goals.

This article discusses the effects of the compensation system and employee incentives on business performance in banking in two areas. First of all, based on the statistics on the banking sector in Taiwan, it explores the regulating effects of different compensation systems on two conflicts in the industry. It also reviews the literature on Conflict Theory. Research shows that when people trust each other, they tend to accept a value statement different from theirs. And our research also shows that trust can minimize task conflict and relationship conflict between team members. Moreover, after identifying the role of compensation structure to trust and task conflict, this article further categorizes the structure into team performance reward and individual performance reward. Analysis points out that when the organization bases compensation payment on team performance reward, the relationship between trust and task conflict is higher than that on individual performance reward. That is, team performance reward better helps to reinforce such correlation compared to individual performance reward.

Second, the research studies different forms of employee incentives in Taiwan’s banking sector as well as resulting performance. During the studied period, the majority of the financial institutions preferred cash bonus. In addition, financial institutions also take other incentives. Cash bonus covered the highest percentage, followed by share bonus, treasury repo and transfer, and options in order. We study the ROEs under different incentives and conclude it is higher and more stable in the institutions offering multiple employee shares instead of single method. Whether the incentives are implemented also influence the level of net ROE.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016