Matching Items (17)

132638-Thumbnail Image.png

A Story of Resettlement

Description

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to bring this project to fruition. This refugee inspired us to show the personal side of the issue of resettlement and we believed that she would be able to make an impact on others if we could share her story. The purpose of this project was to record this refugees story of resettlement in America. As mentioned above, we wanted to share their powerful journey from Rwanda to America. We believed that by introducing a personal story to a relatively impersonal matter we would bring more understanding to this issue. We wanted to create a project that could not only be a source of education, but also have a personal aspect that would inspire many to learn more and get involved with issues that are important to them. We believed creating this short film would be the best way we could have this story reach more people. Over these seven months, we created a short film that told the story of the Rwandan genocide and the American resettlement process from the unique perspective of someone who has experienced both.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2019-05

132910-Thumbnail Image.png

International Refugees in London, England: Post-2016 European Union Referendum

Description

International refugees have continuously shaped the identity of modern London, England, creating a diverse cityscape. However, the referendum in June 2016 indicated a perceived desire of the majority of United Kingdom (UK) citizens to leave the European Union (EU) and

International refugees have continuously shaped the identity of modern London, England, creating a diverse cityscape. However, the referendum in June 2016 indicated a perceived desire of the majority of United Kingdom (UK) citizens to leave the European Union (EU) and the domination of far-right, anti-immigrant rhetoric in British politics. These elements have given rise to the question of how refugees will find belonging in a geographical space that continues to create borders at both a national and borough level. As the Brexit vote still stands, barriers to applying for refugee status and successful resettlement could increase - complicating the lives of refugees wanting to resettle in the UK. Urban spaces such as London, Manchester, and Birmingham have transformed into places where the lives of the British cross daily with the lives of those forcibly removed from their home state. With minimal current research on the relationship between international refugees in London and the current social and political identity of the city, post-Brexit vote, I believe there is a gap in understanding to be filled. This gap includes defining the relationship between place, people, and politics in the context of the city of London as well as the boroughs that comprise the city. In addition, this research explores the future of London as a place at a borough-level and aims to understand how the idea of borders and nationalism have been uncovered and subsequently amplified through the referendum. The following paper includes data collected from British refugee agencies and inhabitants of five London boroughs that will add to existing research in the form of academic and professional journals and published reports produced by refugee agencies and the British government in hopes to identify the current nature of the relationship between international refugees and Londoners and how this relationship might shift in the future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

133554-Thumbnail Image.png

How Well Do You Know Your Neighbor? College Knowledge: Canada vs The United States

Description

As the world becomes more globalized, the role of geographic knowledge in everyday affairs grows. Notwithstanding this idea, previous research surveys indicate that young adults are geographically illiterate but little research has been done in the past decade to investigate

As the world becomes more globalized, the role of geographic knowledge in everyday affairs grows. Notwithstanding this idea, previous research surveys indicate that young adults are geographically illiterate but little research has been done in the past decade to investigate if this still holds true. In order to examine the current geographic literacy of young adults, American and Canadian college students were surveyed regarding geographic knowledge of their neighboring country. To do this, I made a trip to the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia to survey Canadian students in person. I also did in person surveys at Arizona State University to collect American students' knowledge. Both surveys were done with pen and paper and questions were either identical or similar in what geographic knowledge the question was testing the survey taker on (i.e what is the capital of Canada for American students and what is the Capital of the United States for Canadian students). Results indicated that despite being from different countries, both participant pools showed similar knowledge about their neighboring country with almost identical scores; American college students answered an average of 50% of the questions correct and Canadian students slightly above that at 51% of questions correct. Although the scores were similar, underneath the overall survey results was a lot of variety in the students' responses, particularly regarding the subject and questions each student pool excelled in. In conclusion, however, it seems that both Canadian students and American students struggled more with political geography than they did with cultural geography but are overall illiterate in geographical knowledge with only being able to answer half of the questions correct.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City

Description

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees within the city of Phoenix. Through an IRB approved research

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees within the city of Phoenix. Through an IRB approved research study, multiple refugee families were interviewed and photographed. The project documented refugees and their stories and then made those interviews accessible to the greater Phoenix community. The purpose was to make the Phoenix community more aware of refugees in the hopes that this awareness would increase community activism and advocacy for this resilient yet vulnerable minority group. This paper explains the refugee resettlement process and addresses the social and economic implications of refugee resettlement and advocacy within an urban area. Many inhabitants of Phoenix are unaware the refugees that live in their city because of the geographic divide between social classes and ethnic groups. In highly urbanized communities, the geographic layout of the city leads to a more individualistic and segregated society. This notion leads to a discussion of Robert Putnam's theory of social capital, which argued that by improving and fostering social connections, one could increase social well-being and even make the economy more efficient. This paper then applies Putnam's ideas to the interaction between refugees and non-refugees, using space as a determining factor in measuring the social capital of the Phoenix community. As evident in the study of Phoenix's geographic divide between social and economic classes, Phoenix, like many urban cities, is not designed in a way that fosters social capital. Therefore, advocacy must go beyond people and into advocacy for a different kind of city and place that sets up refugees, and non-refugees alike, to succeed. In this way, rethinking the city through urban planning becomes integral to making new social networks possible, building social capital, and increasing social welfare in urban spaces.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

128093-Thumbnail Image.png

Multiple Access Points Within the Online Classroom: Where Students Look for Information

Description

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such as course design, teaching presence and student patterns in looking

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such as course design, teaching presence and student patterns in looking for information. The sample population included students from a major online university in their first year course sequence. Students were tasked with completing a survey at the end of the course, indicating their preference for accessing information within the online classroom. The qualitative data indicated that student preference is to receive information from multiple access points and sources within the online classroom architecture. Students also expressed a desire to have information delivered through the usage of technology such as email and text messaging. In addition to receiving information from multiple sources, the qualitative data indicated students were satisfied overall, with the current ways in which they received and accessed information within the online classroom setting. Major findings suggest that instructors teaching within the online classroom should have multiple data access points within the classroom architecture. Furthermore, instructors should use a variety of communication venues to enhance the ability for students to access and receive information pertinent to the course.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017

Life in a Museum: My Past & Present in Prescott, Arizona

Description

I am double majoring in Film & Media Production and Geography, and whenever I tell anyone that their first reaction is one of polite incredulity. The two disciplines seem so far from each other that there doesn't seem to be

I am double majoring in Film & Media Production and Geography, and whenever I tell anyone that their first reaction is one of polite incredulity. The two disciplines seem so far from each other that there doesn't seem to be any possible way of combining them. With this project, I wanted to incorporate these two very different fields into one meaningful product. Using film as a medium, I explored how impactful a geographical location can truly be on someone. When we think about our pasts, we often focus on the people and events, losing sight of the physical location where these memories take place. Life in a Museum attempts to shine a light on this forgotten aspect of memory. I moved to Prescott, Arizona when I was 11 and moved away when I was 18, living there for only 7 years. Yet as time passes, I am starting to realize how impactful Prescott has been on me. For my Honors Creative Project, I created a video essay in an attempt to "map" my relationship with Prescott and how it has changed over time. Incorporating digital video, Google SketchUp Animations and historical photographs, Life in a Museum acts as collage that attempts to mimic the tangential aspects of memory. The film addresses my upbringing in Prescott, the town's intense pride for its history, and how living there has affected my own perception of time, memory, death and the future. Link to video: https://vimeo.com/126633587

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136168-Thumbnail Image.png

Dreamers in America

Description

Abstract The United States has a very long history of putting laws into place that enable certain people to immigrate equally, but prevent others from doing so, thus promoting large undocumented populations. In many instances the people creating these laws

Abstract The United States has a very long history of putting laws into place that enable certain people to immigrate equally, but prevent others from doing so, thus promoting large undocumented populations. In many instances the people creating these laws cite worries that the people attempting to enter the United States are a hazard to the country. Some examples of this include :the "Chinese Exclusion Act", which prevented people from China from immigrating, the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII, and the creating of various laws that designated Irish people as not being white during the 18th century. Now there is a debate over whether or not people who come to the United States undocumented with their parents at a young age should be barred from living here. These Dreamers are at the center of this often debated issue. A set of hour-long interviews has been conducted with seven dreamers in order to get their opinions on several topics. These include SB1070, the Dream Act, HB56, and a variety of other topics. In addition a comprehensive timeline and review of legislation concerning immigration has been created to provide a historical context. Lastly, my own conclusion about this topic have been presented.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136932-Thumbnail Image.png

Traveling Abroad: A Minority Student's Experience

Description

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority has become part of my identity, thus influencing how I

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority has become part of my identity, thus influencing how I make decisions about finances and traveling. Minorities are faced with many more concern, like familial concerns and financial obligations which hinder their desire to attempt to travel (Salisbury, Paulsen, & Ernest, 2011). My main concerns were convincing my parents that traveling to Nicaragua and studying abroad in Greece and Italy would be beneficial to my college experience, along with financially being able to go through with each experience. The main purpose of my thesis is to share what it is like to be a minority faced with cultural and financial obstacles that make it difficult to travel and how the experience is shaped due to these obstacles.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2014-05

136434-Thumbnail Image.png

The Political, Financial & Cultural Difficulties of Operating a Microcredit Lending Institution in Israel & the Palestinian Territories

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural difficulties of operating such an organization. The study investigates microcredit

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural difficulties of operating such an organization. The study investigates microcredit lending organizations (also referred to as microlending organizations or microlending banks) in the State of Israel and the Palestinian Territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip; these organizations are used as a case study to analyze the challenges faced by microlending organizations around the world, as well as an interesting lens to observe the geopolitical and socioeconomic difficulties of small-scale economic engagement in this area of heavy conflict. Finally, interesting patterns, behaviors, policies, and operating methods of microlending banks are scrutinized in order to deeply understand the challenges and philosophies behind microlending.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136256-Thumbnail Image.png

Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs

Description

"Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs" explores the role of food as an instrument of cross-cultural exchange and understanding, in three parts: why food is an ideal medium of communication, how food exchange can be an effective catalyst of conflict

"Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs" explores the role of food as an instrument of cross-cultural exchange and understanding, in three parts: why food is an ideal medium of communication, how food exchange can be an effective catalyst of conflict resolution, and a study that highlights the relationship between ethnic food consumption and positive or negative stereotyping of racial and ethnic groups. The study revealed that those who ate food that lies beyond their culture's traditional culinary boundaries fairly often were more likely to have a higher opinion of different racial and ethnic groups; those who rarely strayed beyond those boundaries were more likely to negatively stereotype different cultures. "Gastrodiplomacy" works its way through the foods of the world, and how innately geography, food, and politics are connected, whether it's through French discrimination against kebabs \u2014 a traditionally Middle Eastern food \u2014 or through the use of the dolma to help settle long-standing disputes between the warring countries of Armenia and Azerbaijan.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05