Matching Items (17)

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Multiple Access Points within the Online Classroom: Where Students Look for Information

Description

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such as course design, teaching presence and student patterns in looking for information. The sample population included students from a major online university in their first year course sequence. Students were tasked with completing a survey at the end of the course, indicating their preference for accessing information within the online classroom. The qualitative data indicated that student preference is to receive information from multiple access points and sources within the online classroom architecture. Students also expressed a desire to have information delivered through the usage of technology such as email and text messaging. In addition to receiving information from multiple sources, the qualitative data indicated students were satisfied overall, with the current ways in which they received and accessed information within the online classroom setting. Major findings suggest that instructors teaching within the online classroom should have multiple data access points within the classroom architecture. Furthermore, instructors should use a variety of communication venues to enhance the ability for students to access and receive information pertinent to the course.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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A Story of Resettlement

Description

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to bring this project to fruition. This refugee inspired us to show the personal side of the issue of resettlement and we believed that she would be able to make an impact on others if we could share her story. The purpose of this project was to record this refugees story of resettlement in America. As mentioned above, we wanted to share their powerful journey from Rwanda to America. We believed that by introducing a personal story to a relatively impersonal matter we would bring more understanding to this issue. We wanted to create a project that could not only be a source of education, but also have a personal aspect that would inspire many to learn more and get involved with issues that are important to them. We believed creating this short film would be the best way we could have this story reach more people. Over these seven months, we created a short film that told the story of the Rwandan genocide and the American resettlement process from the unique perspective of someone who has experienced both.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The Political, Financial & Cultural Difficulties of Operating a Microcredit Lending Institution in Israel & the Palestinian Territories

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural difficulties of operating such an organization. The study investigates microcredit lending organizations (also referred to as microlending organizations or microlending banks) in the State of Israel and the Palestinian Territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip; these organizations are used as a case study to analyze the challenges faced by microlending organizations around the world, as well as an interesting lens to observe the geopolitical and socioeconomic difficulties of small-scale economic engagement in this area of heavy conflict. Finally, interesting patterns, behaviors, policies, and operating methods of microlending banks are scrutinized in order to deeply understand the challenges and philosophies behind microlending.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Efficacy of International versus State Policies towards Displaced Persons and their Effects on Human Geography

Description

The purpose of this thesis was to answer the research question of how do states and international agencies, respectively, differ in application of efforts towards implementation of refugee rights, status,

The purpose of this thesis was to answer the research question of how do states and international agencies, respectively, differ in application of efforts towards implementation of refugee rights, status, and protection and/or resettlement and why these differences occur. The respective refugee crises that arose following the Bosnian war in the 1990s and the Syrian civil war happening in the present day were used as case studies to further examine and answer this question. These case studies were chosen due to their relatively large refugee populations and differing causes for said refugee populations. To properly measure efficacy of refugee policies on a state and international level, the dispute of state sovereignty versus the right to international intervention was focused on and assessed exhaustively throughout this paper. It was determined that sovereignty could only be deemed legitimate and free of international intervention if certain basic functions (keeping the peace, upholding human rights, etc.) were being upheld within a territory's borders. In the cases of both Bosnia and Syria, the lack of protection and rights provided for refugees warranted international intervention, yet that intervention was not always carried out in the most efficient manner. This paper sought to elaborate on why international intervention occurred when it did and whether it was more powerful than state sovereignty. In the end, international agencies would be most effective in implementing refugee policies if individual states complied with those set policies. Until then, the battle between international policies and the proper implementation of those policies by individual states will remain an intricate one.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City

Description

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees within the city of Phoenix. Through an IRB approved research study, multiple refugee families were interviewed and photographed. The project documented refugees and their stories and then made those interviews accessible to the greater Phoenix community. The purpose was to make the Phoenix community more aware of refugees in the hopes that this awareness would increase community activism and advocacy for this resilient yet vulnerable minority group. This paper explains the refugee resettlement process and addresses the social and economic implications of refugee resettlement and advocacy within an urban area. Many inhabitants of Phoenix are unaware the refugees that live in their city because of the geographic divide between social classes and ethnic groups. In highly urbanized communities, the geographic layout of the city leads to a more individualistic and segregated society. This notion leads to a discussion of Robert Putnam's theory of social capital, which argued that by improving and fostering social connections, one could increase social well-being and even make the economy more efficient. This paper then applies Putnam's ideas to the interaction between refugees and non-refugees, using space as a determining factor in measuring the social capital of the Phoenix community. As evident in the study of Phoenix's geographic divide between social and economic classes, Phoenix, like many urban cities, is not designed in a way that fosters social capital. Therefore, advocacy must go beyond people and into advocacy for a different kind of city and place that sets up refugees, and non-refugees alike, to succeed. In this way, rethinking the city through urban planning becomes integral to making new social networks possible, building social capital, and increasing social welfare in urban spaces.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Growing Global: Tempe's Global Citizenship Education Program

Description

According to the 2010 census, 40 million people living in the United States were foreign-born, meaning they were not U.S. citizens at birth (2). The Harvard Business Review also said

According to the 2010 census, 40 million people living in the United States were foreign-born, meaning they were not U.S. citizens at birth (2). The Harvard Business Review also said that "In 2017, strong growth across most of the world propelled the DHL Global Connectedness Index to a record high. The proportions of trade, capital, information, and people flow crossing national borders all increased significantly" (7). With the U.S. being a cultural "mixing pot" and the world being more globalized than ever before, we must incorporate global citizenship education in our school systems. Growing Global is a creative project thesis that explores the idea of a global citizenship after-school program for youth in the Tempe Public School District. The outcomes of this project will be a proposal for the program, a curriculum outline including three examples of lesson plans [see Exhibit 1], student surveys for measuring curriculum effectiveness [see Exhibit 3], and an educator training guide and preparedness assessment [see Exhibits 2 and 4]. The Growing Global project proposal will cover the need for the program, a program timeline and explanation, the impact it will hold and how to measure it, potential barriers, the capacity of the team and its resources, and the budget for piloting the program.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Traveling Abroad: A Minority Student's Experience

Description

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority has become part of my identity, thus influencing how I make decisions about finances and traveling. Minorities are faced with many more concern, like familial concerns and financial obligations which hinder their desire to attempt to travel (Salisbury, Paulsen, & Ernest, 2011). My main concerns were convincing my parents that traveling to Nicaragua and studying abroad in Greece and Italy would be beneficial to my college experience, along with financially being able to go through with each experience. The main purpose of my thesis is to share what it is like to be a minority faced with cultural and financial obstacles that make it difficult to travel and how the experience is shaped due to these obstacles.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Sexual Violence and Exploitation in Syrian Women Seeking Refuge from Civil War: The Role of the International Community in Providing Safety

Description

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and fear of sexual violence. Sexual violence against Syrian women is life altering because of the high value the culture places on virtue and modesty; a woman who is known to have been raped faces shame, possible disenfranchisement by her family, and is at high risk for suicide and in some extreme, but few cases, being murdered by a family member in an honor killing. However, once these refugees arrive they are still threatened not only with sexual violence, but also with sexual exploitation. Sexual violence is devastating to women and families. The international community must work to combat it by helping host countries to prevent the violence, assist victims, prosecute perpetrators, and create safe environments for female refugees. Human rights advocates should look within the philosophy of Islam to encourage gender equality ethics already present therein.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Sustainability and Identity: The Case of Costa Rica

Description

This study examines sustainable development concerns as an essential part of the Costa Rican national identity. Interviews with ecotourism industry workers and an analysis of pertinent news articles shine light

This study examines sustainable development concerns as an essential part of the Costa Rican national identity. Interviews with ecotourism industry workers and an analysis of pertinent news articles shine light on the Costa Rican citizen's perspective of sustainable development, showing that in spite of current initiatives industry workers still have unmet environmental and economic concerns, and that the general public is both passionately interested and personally invested in the topic.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Doctors without Borders and Humanitarian Space: how MSF impacts the geography and politics around them

Description

The international disaster-relief organization Doctors without Borders (MSF) is a dynamic geopolitical actor. Using a systematic literature review of academic journal articles and first person accounts by doctors from the

The international disaster-relief organization Doctors without Borders (MSF) is a dynamic geopolitical actor. Using a systematic literature review of academic journal articles and first person accounts by doctors from the field, the geopolitical role of MSF was analyzed. This search returned a wide range of articles many of which referenced the term “humanitarian space”. MSF utilizes humanitarian space to accomplish their medical work and witnessing actions in disaster areas. MSF’s geopolitical role stems from many of the central characteristics of the organization, but the process of creating humanitarian space engages them differently at both a global and a local level. Case studies of MSF’s work in Haiti and Rwanda reveal the interplay between global and local levels. Humanitarian space at the global level is a more imagined space. At this level, MSF relies on their practice of “témoignage” or testifying as their primary method for creating this space. At the local level, MSF focuses on their humanitarian patient-care to earn themselves space uninhibited by other power-wielding groups. These two levels work as a see-saw so that when the humanitarian space occupied by MSF is threatened at one level they can lean on their space at other in order to continue providing the best services possible. During the Rwandan genocide, MSF’s on the ground was work was limited to a single hospital in a single city and to compensate, they worked hard at the global level to bring attention to the violent situation in the country. This balance switched in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake of 2010 during which massive space for humanitarian action on the ground, made advocating at a local level unnecessary. Analysis of MSF from a political geography perspective opens up new avenues of examining the many interdisciplinary characteristics of an organization as wide-reaching as Doctors without Borders.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05