Matching Items (4)

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I’ll Show You the Way: Risky Driver Behavior When “Following a Friend”

Description

Previous research examining social influences on driving behavior has primarily focused on the effects of passengers and surrounding vehicles (e.g., speed contagion). Of current interest was the interaction between drivers

Previous research examining social influences on driving behavior has primarily focused on the effects of passengers and surrounding vehicles (e.g., speed contagion). Of current interest was the interaction between drivers that occurs in a “following a friend” scenario, i.e., the driver of one vehicle (the leader) knows how to get to the desired destination while the driver of a second vehicle (the follower) does not. Sixteen participants drove through a simulated city in a driving simulator under three conditions: (i) a baseline condition in which they could choose their own route, (ii) a navigation system condition in which they were given audible route instructions, and (iii) a “follow a friend” condition in which they required to follow a simulated vehicle. In the follow a friend condition, drivers engaged in significantly more risky behaviors (in comparison to the other conditions) such as making more erratic and higher speed turns and lane changes, maintaining overall higher speed, as well as maintaining a shorter time headway when following a lead vehicle. These effects suggest a relationship to time pressure caused by a fear of getting lost.

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  • 2017-05-09

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Driving and elderly primes in a simulated driving environment

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ABSTRACT Research studies have demonstrated that stereotypes can elicit a priming response. An experiment was conducted to test the effects of priming elderly and young stereotypes on driving behavior. Participants

ABSTRACT Research studies have demonstrated that stereotypes can elicit a priming response. An experiment was conducted to test the effects of priming elderly and young stereotypes on driving behavior. Participants drove in a driving simulator while navigating through two driving routes. Participants were guided by a neutral voice similar to "Siri" that informed them where to turn. Each route primed the participants with names that were deemed "old" or "young" as determined by a survey. The experiment yielded slower driving speeds in the elderly condition than in the young consistent with previous research regarding elderly stereotypes (Bargh et al, 1996; Branaghan and Gray, 2010; Taylor, 2010; Foster, 2012). These findings extend research on priming and behaviors elicited by participants in a simulated driving environment.

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Date Created
  • 2014

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Mere exposure effect on uncanny feelings toward virtual characters and robots

Description

As technology increases, so does the concern that the humanlike virtual characters and android robots being created today will fall into the uncanny valley. The current study aims to

As technology increases, so does the concern that the humanlike virtual characters and android robots being created today will fall into the uncanny valley. The current study aims to determine whether uncanny feelings from modern virtual characters and robots can be significantly affected by the mere exposure effect. Previous research shows that mere exposure can increase positive feelings toward novel stimuli (Zajonc, 1968). It is predicted that the repeated exposure to virtual characters and robots can cause a significant decrease in uncanny feelings. The current study aimed to show that modern virtual characters and robots possessing uncanny traits will be rated significantly less uncanny after being viewed multiple times.

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Date Created
  • 2014

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An investigation of the role of goal setting during vicarious learning of physics

Description

Observational tutoring has been found to be an effective method for teaching a variety of subjects by reusing dialogue from previous successful tutoring sessions. While it has been shown content

Observational tutoring has been found to be an effective method for teaching a variety of subjects by reusing dialogue from previous successful tutoring sessions. While it has been shown content can be learned through observational tutoring it has yet to been examined if a secondary behavior such as goal-setting can be influenced. The present study investigated if observing virtual humans engaging in a tutoring session on rotational kinematics with embedded positive goal oriented dialogue would increase knowledge of the material and perpetuate a shift an observer's goal-orientation from performance avoidance goal orientation (PAVGO) to learning goal orientation (LGO). Learning gains were observed in pre to post test knowledge retention tests. Significant changes from pretest to posttest occurred across conditions for LGO. Additionally, significant changes from PAVGO pretest to posttest were observed in the control condition however PAVGO did not significantly change in the experimental condition.

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Date Created
  • 2014