Matching Items (17)

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Skip the Trip: Air Travelers' Behavioral Responses to Pandemic Influenza

Description

Theory suggests that human behavior has implications for disease spread. We examine the hypothesis that individuals engage in voluntary defensive behavior during an epidemic. We estimate the number of passengers

Theory suggests that human behavior has implications for disease spread. We examine the hypothesis that individuals engage in voluntary defensive behavior during an epidemic. We estimate the number of passengers missing previously purchased flights as a function of concern for swine flu or A/H1N1 influenza using 1.7 million detailed flight records, Google Trends, and the World Health Organization's FluNet data. We estimate that concern over “swine flu,” as measured by Google Trends, accounted for 0.34% of missed flights during the epidemic. The Google Trends data correlates strongly with media attention, but poorly (at times negatively) with reported cases in FluNet. Passengers show no response to reported cases. Passengers skipping their purchased trips forwent at least $50 M in travel related benefits. Responding to actual cases would have cut this estimate in half. Thus, people appear to respond to an epidemic by voluntarily engaging in self-protection behavior, but this behavior may not be responsive to objective measures of risk. Clearer risk communication could substantially reduce epidemic costs. People undertaking costly risk reduction behavior, for example, forgoing nonrefundable flights, suggests they may also make less costly behavior adjustments to avoid infection. Accounting for defensive behaviors may be important for forecasting epidemics, but linking behavior with epidemics likely requires consideration of risk communication.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-03-20

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Residential Choice’s Impact on Sustainable Transportation Options: A Study in the Phoenix Metro Area

Description

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process.

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process. We also noticed that “commute” means different things to different households, and that many people did not consider their commute to work to be a primary factor determining their final home location. Moreover, many people were willing to increase their commute time, or trade access to desirable amenities for a longer commute. Commuting time to work was one example of the tradeoffs that homeowners make when choosing a home, but there were also others such as architectural type and access to neighborhood amenities. Lastly, time constraints proved to be a very significant factor in the home buying process. Several of our households had such strict time constraints that limited their search to a point of excluding whole areas. Overall, our study sheds light on transportation’s role in residential choice and underscores the complexity of the location choice process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Analysis of the Apartments Surrounding Arizona State University: How Much Does the Distance to Campus Affect the Rental Price of Apartments?

Description

With the ongoing student debt crisis and the continuing increase in the cost of attending a college or university, there has been an increasing conversation regarding the price of room

With the ongoing student debt crisis and the continuing increase in the cost of attending a college or university, there has been an increasing conversation regarding the price of room and board. Prior studies have shown the presence of a relationship between the distance to a location of interest, but few have been done with college campuses in mind. To answer this question, we used the Hedonic Pricing Model in order to isolate the effect that the distance to campus has on the rental price of apartments. Our results showed a clear positive nonlinear relationship between distance to campus and the price of apartment rentals in the area surrounding Arizona State University.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Price of Electric Power Emissions

Description

The Clean Power Plan seeks to reduce CO2 emissions in the energy industry, which is the largest source of CO2 emissions in the United States. In order to comply with

The Clean Power Plan seeks to reduce CO2 emissions in the energy industry, which is the largest source of CO2 emissions in the United States. In order to comply with the Clean Power Plan, electric utilities in Arizona will need to meet the electricity demand while reducing the use of fossil fuel sources in generation. The study first outlines the organization of the power sector in the United States and the structural and price changes attempted in the industry during the period of restructuring. The recent final rule of the Clean Power Plan is then described in detail with a narrowed focus on Arizona. Data from APS, a representative utility of Arizona, is used for the remainder of the analysis to determine the price increase necessary to cut Arizona's CO2 emissions in order to meet the federal goal. The first regression models the variables which affect total demand and thus generation load, from which we estimate the marginal effect of price on demand. The second regression models CO2 emissions as a function of different levels of generation. This allows the effect of generation on emissions to fluctuate with ranges of load, following the logic of the merit order of plants and changing rates of emissions for different sources. Two methods are used to find the necessary percentage increase in price to meet the CPP goals: one based on the mass-based goal for Arizona and the other based on the percentage reduction for Arizona. Then a price increase is calculated for a projection into the future using known changes in energy supply.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Software for Agent-Based Computational Economics

Description

Agent Based modeling has been used in computer science to simulate complex phenomena. The introduction of Agent Based Models into the field of economics (Agent Based Computational Economics ACE) is

Agent Based modeling has been used in computer science to simulate complex phenomena. The introduction of Agent Based Models into the field of economics (Agent Based Computational Economics ACE) is not new, however work on making model environments simpler to design for individuals without a background in computer science or computer engineering is a constantly evolving topic. The issue is a trade off of how much is handled by the framework and how much control the modeler has, as well as what tools exist to allow the user to develop insights from the behavior of the model. The solutions looked at in this thesis are the construction of a simplified grammar for model construction, the design of an economic based library to assist in ACE modeling, and examples of how to construct interactive models.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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The Impossible Survey: The Effect of Information Provision on Sustainable Food Choice

Description

Amid the fast-growing market of plant-based alternatives to conventional meat, there still lies uncertainty about consumers’ preferences for these new products. Through an online survey using a Becker-DeGroot-Marschak mechanism, I

Amid the fast-growing market of plant-based alternatives to conventional meat, there still lies uncertainty about consumers’ preferences for these new products. Through an online survey using a Becker-DeGroot-Marschak mechanism, I test the effect that environmental information provision has on consumers’ immediate and long-term willingness- to-pay for the Whopper and Impossible Whopper from Burger King. Respondents were randomly assigned to either a control group or a treatment group, and both received information on taste in an attempt to isolate the effect of environmental information. Results show that certain groups respond to the information differently. Specifically, consumers who care about climate change are affected greatly by environmental in- formation suggesting these “climate advocates” are not fully informed despite the efforts of Impossible Foods. Vegetarians and highly educated individuals have relatively stronger preferences for the plant-based burger, in line with previous studies. Results also show a lasting effect of information on WTP, suggesting little need for repeated interventions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Avoidance Behaviour to Swine Flu

Description

Did the amount of media attention to the H1N1 flu or the information that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) disseminates about the H1N1 flu, influence individuals' decisions to avoid

Did the amount of media attention to the H1N1 flu or the information that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) disseminates about the H1N1 flu, influence individuals' decisions to avoid public locations during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Influenza pandemic? I investigate this question using weekly-confirmed H1N1 cases from the CDC, the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), and the Google Trends weekly search volume index for certain key terms. I found that individuals did exhibit some avoidance behaviour during the flu pandemic in response to the CDC data, but not the measures of media attention. However, the magnitudes of these adjustments are small in comparison to other measures of avoidance behaviour, such as reduced time in public during extreme weather events.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Privacy Valuation Experiment

Description

This survey takes information on a participant’s beliefs on privacy security, the general digital knowledge, demographics, and willingness-to-pay points on if they would delete information on their social media, to

This survey takes information on a participant’s beliefs on privacy security, the general digital knowledge, demographics, and willingness-to-pay points on if they would delete information on their social media, to see how an information treatment affects those payment points. This information treatment is meant to make half of the participants think about the deeper ramifications of the information they reveal. The initial hypothesis is that this information will make people want to pay more to remove their information from the web, but the results find a surprising negative correlation with the treatment.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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District Wealth and Arizona School Voucher Program Participation

Description

This study estimates the effect of district wealth on Arizona Empowerment Scholarship Account program participation using data from the Arizona Department of Education. We find that students from poor

This study estimates the effect of district wealth on Arizona Empowerment Scholarship Account program participation using data from the Arizona Department of Education. We find that students from poor districts are not more likely to participate as school performance decreases.Conversely, those from wealthy districts do increase participation as school performance decreases. We briefly try to explain the observed heterogeneity through survey results and commenting on the program design.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Merging Economics and Epidemiology to Improve the Prediction and Management of Infectious Disease

Description

Mathematical epidemiology, one of the oldest and richest areas in mathematical biology, has significantly enhanced our understanding of how pathogens emerge, evolve, and spread. Classical epidemiological models, the standard for

Mathematical epidemiology, one of the oldest and richest areas in mathematical biology, has significantly enhanced our understanding of how pathogens emerge, evolve, and spread. Classical epidemiological models, the standard for predicting and managing the spread of infectious disease, assume that contacts between susceptible and infectious individuals depend on their relative frequency in the population. The behavioral factors that underpin contact rates are not generally addressed. There is, however, an emerging a class of models that addresses the feedbacks between infectious disease dynamics and the behavioral decisions driving host contact. Referred to as “economic epidemiology” or “epidemiological economics,” the approach explores the determinants of decisions about the number and type of contacts made by individuals, using insights and methods from economics. We show how the approach has the potential both to improve predictions of the course of infectious disease, and to support development of novel approaches to infectious disease management.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12-01