Matching Items (4)

128437-Thumbnail Image.png

Novel Single-Stranded DNA Virus Genomes Recovered from Chimpanzee Feces Sampled from the Mambilla Plateau in Nigeria

Description

Metagenomic approaches are rapidly expanding our knowledge of the diversity of viruses. In the fecal matter of Nigerian chimpanzees we recovered three gokushovirus genomes, one circular replication-associated protein encoding single-stranded DNA virus (CRESS), and a CRESS DNA molecule.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-03-02

128444-Thumbnail Image.png

Genome Sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Oat dwarf virus, Turnip curly top virus, and Wheat dwarf virus Identified in Leafhoppers

Description

Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf

Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf viruses, the first from Iran, and Wheat dwarf virus from leafhoppers feeding on beet, parsley, pumpkin, and turnip plants.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-02-23

131689-Thumbnail Image.png

Towards understanding ssDNA viral dynamics in Marmota flaviventris (yellow-bellied marmots)

Description

Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flavivent) are semi-fossorial ground-dwelling sciurid rodents native to the western United States. They are facultatively social and live in colonies that may contain over 50 individuals. Marmot

Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flavivent) are semi-fossorial ground-dwelling sciurid rodents native to the western United States. They are facultatively social and live in colonies that may contain over 50 individuals. Marmot populations are well studied in terms of their diet, life cycle, distribution, and behavior, however, knowledge about viruses associated with marmots is very limited. In this study we aim to identify DNA viruses by non-invasive sampling of their feces. Viral DNA was extracted from fecal material of 35 individual marmots collected in Colorado and subsequently submitted to rolling circle amplification for circular molecule enrichment. Using a viral metagenomics approach which included high-throughput sequencing and verification of viral genomes using PCR, cloning and sequencing, a diverse group of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses were identified. Diverse ssDNA viruses were identified that belong to two established families, Genomoviridae (n=7) and Anelloviridae (n=1) and several others that belong to unclassified circular replication associated encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA virus groups (n=19). There were also circular DNA molecules extracted (n=4) that appear to encode one viral-like gene and are composed of <1545 nt. The viruses that belonged to the family Genomoviridae clustered with those in the Gemycircularvirus genus. The genomoviruses were extracted from 6 samples. These clustered with gemycircularvirus extracted from arachnids and feces. The anellovirus, extracted from one sample, identified here has a genome sequence that is most similar to those from other rodent species, lagomorphs, and mosquitos. The CRESS viruses identified here were extracted from 9 samples and are novel and cluster with others identified from avian species. This study gives a snapshot of viruses associated with marmots based on fecal sampling.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

148480-Thumbnail Image.png

Circular DNA viruses identified in short-finned pilot whale and orca tissue samples

Description

Members of the Delphinidae family are widely distributed across the world’s oceans. We used a viral metagenomic approach to identify viruses in orca (Orcinus orca) and short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala

Members of the Delphinidae family are widely distributed across the world’s oceans. We used a viral metagenomic approach to identify viruses in orca (Orcinus orca) and short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) muscle, kidney, and liver samples from deceased animals. From orca tissue samples (muscle, kidney, and liver), we identified a novel polyomavirus (Polyomaviridae), three cressdnaviruses, and two genomoviruses (Genomoviridae). In the short-finned pilot whale we were able to identify one genomovirus in a kidney sample. The presence of unclassified cressdnavirus within two samples (muscle and kidney) of the same animal supports the possibility these viruses might be widespread within the animal. The orca polyomavirus identified here is the first of its species and is not closely related to the only other dolphin polyomavirus previously discovered. The identification and verification of these viruses expands the current knowledge of viruses that are associated with the Delphinidae family.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05