Matching Items (7)

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The Procurement Predicament: Replacing 214 Print Devices Across the Nation

Description

Replacing 214 print devices at 24 different sites across North America seemed
like an impossible project for me to manage just one year ago. Having just learned
about procurement a semester ago, and having little experience in the

Replacing 214 print devices at 24 different sites across North America seemed
like an impossible project for me to manage just one year ago. Having just learned
about procurement a semester ago, and having little experience in the corporate world, I
set out as an intern at a company I will refer to as Company A, to undertake this project
with much to learn. I soon learned that replacing printers was not so simple, having to
first complete a contract that been worked on for almost two years. Following that, I had
to build relationships both internally and externally, establishing myself as the project
manager with both the vendor and Company A’s internal team. I sought to achieve
accuracy and efficiency, frequently communicating and verifying inventory before finally
beginning to replace printers across North America. After 7 months of hard-work,
collaboration, and communication, Company A was able to successfully receive all their
new print devices.
Along the way, I learned several lessons regarding goal setting, bottlenecks, and
communication. As the project kept receiving continual delays, I realized the
nonobtainable timeline and goals that were established. I also soon found bottlenecks
were constantly being avoided and pushed into the background, before growing into
large issues as the project progressed. One of the largest bottlenecks being an internal
disagreement on the secure print feature of the print devices. Finally, I found
communication between internal teams was not enough in reducing conflict and
increasing efficiency. From my experience with this project and as an intern, I have
learned many lessons that I will utilize in my professional career in the supply chain
field.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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A supply chain analysis on the food industry’s surge of waste in response to COVID-19

Description

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout has increased, there is less emphasis on sustainability.<br/>Plastic is known for its harmful effects on the environment and the extreme length of time it takes to decompose. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), almost 8 million tons of plastic end up in the oceans at an annual rate, threatening not only the safety of marine species, but also human health. Modern food packaging materials have included a blend of synthetic ingredients, trickling into our daily lives and polluting the air, water, and land. Single-use plastic items slowly degrade into microplastics and can take up to hundreds of years to biodegrade.<br/>Due to COVID-19, restaurants have switched to takeout and delivery options to adapt to the new business environment and guidelines enforced by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) mandated guidelines.<br/>Some of these guidelines include: notices encouraging social distancing and mask-wearing, mandated masks for employees, and easy access to sanitary supplies.<br/>This cultural shift is motivating restaurants to search for a quick, cheap, and easy fix to adapt to the increased demand of take-out and delivery methods. This increases their plastic consumption of items such as plastic bags/paper bags, styrofoam containers, and beverage cups. Plastic is the most popular takeout material because of its price and durability as well as allowing for limited contamination and easy disposability.<br/>Almost all food products come in packaging and this, more often than not, is single use. Food is the largest market out of all the packaging industry, maintaining roughly two thirds of material going to food. The US Environmental Protection Agency reports that almost half of all municipal solid waste is made up of food and food packaging materials. In 2014, over 162 million tons of packaging material waste was generated in the states. This typically contains toxic inks and dyes that leach into groundwater and soil. When degrading, pieces of plastic absorb toxins like PCBs and pesticides, and then each piece will in turn release toxic chemicals like Bisphenol A. Even before being thrown away, it causes negative effects for the environment. The creation of packaging materials uses many resources such as petroleum and chemicals and then releases toxic byproducts. Such byproducts include sludge containing contaminants, greenhouse gases, and heavy metal and particulate matter emissions. Unlike many other industries, plastic manufacturing has actually increased production. Demand has increased and especially in the food industry to keep things sanitary. This increase in production is reflective of the increase in waste. <br/>Although restaurants have implemented their own sustainable initiatives to combat their carbon footprint, the pandemic has unfortunately forced restaurants to digress. For example, Just Salad, a fast food restaurant chain, incentivized customers with discounted meals to use reusable bowls which saved over 75,000 pounds of plastic per year. However, when the pandemic hit, the company halted the program to pivot towards takeout and delivery. This effect is apparent on an international scale. Singapore was in lock-down for eight weeks and during that time, 1,470 tons of takeout and food delivery plastic waste was thrown out. In addition, the Hong Kong environmental group Greeners Action surveyed 2,000 people in April and the results showed that people are ordering out twice as much as last year, doubling the use of plastic.<br/>However, is this surge of plastic usage necessary in the food industry or are there methods that can be used to reduce the amount of waste production? The COVID-19 pandemic caused a fracture in the food system’s supply chain, involving food, factory, and farm. This thesis will strive to tackle such topics by analyzing the supply chains of the food industry and identify areas for sustainable opportunities. These recommendations will help to identify areas for green improvement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Pharmaceutical Supply Chain's Effect on the Opioid Crisis in the United States

Description

In this paper, I assess the current state of the opioid epidemic in the United States which has caused countless deaths since the 1990s. I analyze the current state of the pharmaceutical industry and how it is involved in perpetuating

In this paper, I assess the current state of the opioid epidemic in the United States which has caused countless deaths since the 1990s. I analyze the current state of the pharmaceutical industry and how it is involved in perpetuating the opioid crisis in the United States through its supply chain. I identify four main issues which lead to the continuation of the opioid crisis: the shift to a continuous manufacturing model, the consolidation of pharmacy benefit managers, pharmaceutical companies' influence on medical professionals prescribing opioids to patients and the creation of an informal supply chain in which patients distribute their unused prescription pills. To address these issues and alleviate the problem of the opioid crisis caused by supply chains I propose that pharmacy benefit managers implement blockchain technology to increase supply chain visibility, increasing buyer power in the market and developing a reverse logistics system within the supply chain to dispose of unused prescriptions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

Fusing the Gig-Economy and Last-Mile Delivery: A Case for an Amazon-Uber Partnership

Fusing the Gig-Economy and Last-Mile Delivery: A Case for an Amazon-Uber Partnership

Description

Innovation has been the cornerstone of Amazon’s business strategy and rise to success. After positioning itself as close as possible to the customer and facing new challenges with its logistics providers, Amazon has desperately tried to inhouse last-mile delivery as

Innovation has been the cornerstone of Amazon’s business strategy and rise to success. After positioning itself as close as possible to the customer and facing new challenges with its logistics providers, Amazon has desperately tried to inhouse last-mile delivery as it slowly matures its shipping fleet. In response to the faster delivery promises that it made to its customers, Amazon developed two gig-economy-inspired business ventures, AmazonFlex and Delivery Businesses Partners, to satisfy growing demand in the short run and stunt rising shipping costs. However, in its attempt to regain control of its last-mile, Amazon undervalued the administrative burden needed to manage its contractors: chiefly to process packages quickly and maintain customer satisfaction. It also has not released AmazonFlex nationwide, as its platform is not robust enough to handle all the traffic generated by matching transactions or offer any data about the individualities of each delivery (building type, building access, safe parking, etc.). Even though Amazon Flex resembles the UberEats platform, Amazon does not capture customer responses on last-mile delivery specifically. It therefore has no way of gauging whether this gig-economy solution can offer the same on time delivery targets and equal care in package handling as seasoned carriers.

This paper analyzes why Amazon can further deploy its last mile by partnering with Uber for the short term. By utilizing Uber’s large transactional repository and subject matter expertise on meal delivery, Amazon can refine its short-term solutions, limit inherent risks, and maintain customer satisfaction. Uber stands to profit from the partnership by locking in the necessary demand volume to become profitable, while limiting its marketing expenses and lowering the cost per mile traveled. Uber Drivers will have more “jobs” available to remain logged into Uber’s platform and have the ability to execute multiple deliveries in parallel while having to drive less miles. Amazon already has the necessary physical infrastructure to dispatch packages and would barely need to adjust current operations, considering that all last-mile deliveries are executed by contractors in vans and standard sedans. Likewise, Uber would adapt quickly since its service-level monitoring of over 200,000 restaurants would be reduced to only one stakeholder and routes would often originate at the same point. Lastly, Amazon will not have to continue investing in additional equipment, as drivers will drive their own cars and utilize the Uber platform and its refined safety features.

The arrangement of this thesis is as follows: Chapter 1 will provide background information and list the complexities of last mile delivery. Chapter 2, Amazon’s Competitive Environment, will investigate Amazon’s external risks from a competitive analysis standpoint. Chapter 3 will cover how Amazon has leveraged the gig-economy to deliver its last-mile. Chapter 4 will dive into Uber’s threats and weak financial standing. Finally, Chapter 5 will conclude with the incentives and success metrics that support the proposed partnership.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-12

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An analytical approach to lean six sigma deployment strategies: project identification and prioritization

Description

The ever-changing economic landscape has forced many companies to re-examine their supply chains. Global resourcing and outsourcing of processes has been a strategy many organizations have adopted to reduce cost and to increase their global footprint. This has, however, resulted

The ever-changing economic landscape has forced many companies to re-examine their supply chains. Global resourcing and outsourcing of processes has been a strategy many organizations have adopted to reduce cost and to increase their global footprint. This has, however, resulted in increased process complexity and reduced customer satisfaction. In order to meet and exceed customer expectations, many companies are forced to improve quality and on-time delivery, and have looked towards Lean Six Sigma as an approach to enable process improvement. The Lean Six Sigma literature is rich in deployment strategies; however, there is a general lack of a mathematical approach to deploy Lean Six Sigma in a global enterprise. This includes both project identification and prioritization. The research presented here is two-fold. Firstly, a process characterization framework is presented to evaluate processes based on eight characteristics. An unsupervised learning technique, using clustering algorithms, is then utilized to group processes that are Lean Six Sigma conducive. The approach helps Lean Six Sigma deployment champions to identify key areas within the business to focus a Lean Six Sigma deployment. A case study is presented and 33% of the processes were found to be Lean Six Sigma conducive. Secondly, having identified parts of the business that are lean Six Sigma conducive, the next steps are to formulate and prioritize a portfolio of projects. Very often the deployment champion is faced with the decision of selecting a portfolio of Lean Six Sigma projects that meet multiple objectives which could include: maximizing productivity, customer satisfaction or return on investment, while meeting certain budgetary constraints. A multi-period 0-1 knapsack problem is presented that maximizes the expected net savings of the Lean Six Sigma portfolio over the life cycle of the deployment. Finally, a case study is presented that demonstrates the application of the model in a large multinational company. Traditionally, Lean Six Sigma found its roots in manufacturing. The research presented in this dissertation also emphasizes the applicability of the methodology to the non-manufacturing space. Additionally, a comparison is conducted between manufacturing and non-manufacturing processes to highlight the challenges in deploying the methodology in both spaces.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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A supply chain analysis on the food industry’s surge of waste in response to COVID-19

Description

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout has increased, there is less emphasis on sustainability.<br/>Plastic is known for its harmful effects on the environment and the extreme length of time it takes to decompose. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), almost 8 million tons of plastic end up in the oceans at an annual rate, threatening not only the safety of marine species but also human health. Modern food packaging materials have included a blend of synthetic ingredients, trickling into our daily lives and polluting the air, water, and land. Single-use plastic items slowly degrade into microplastics and can take up to hundreds of years to biodegrade.<br/>Due to COVID-19, restaurants have switched to takeout and delivery options to adapt to the new business environment and guidelines enforced by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) mandated guidelines. Some of these guidelines include: notices encouraging social distancing and mask-wearing, mandated masks for employees, and easy access to sanitary supplies. This cultural shift is motivating restaurants to search for a quick, cheap, and easy fix to adapt to the increased demand of take-out and delivery methods. This increases their plastic consumption of items such as plastic bags/paper bags, styrofoam containers, and beverage cups. Plastic is the most popular takeout material because of its price and durability as well as allowing for limited contamination and easy disposability.<br/>Almost all food products come in packaging and this, more often than not, is single-use. Food is the largest market out of all the packaging industry, maintaining roughly two-thirds of material going to food. The US Environmental Protection Agency reports that almost half of all municipal solid waste is made up of food and food packaging materials. In 2014, over 162 million tons of packaging material waste was generated in the states. This typically contains toxic inks and dyes that leach into groundwater and soil. When degrading, pieces of plastic absorb toxins like PCBs and pesticides, and then each piece will, in turn, release toxic chemicals like Bisphenol-A. Even before being thrown away, it causes negative effects for the environment. The creation of packaging materials uses many resources such as petroleum and chemicals and then releases toxic byproducts. Such byproducts include sludge containing contaminants, greenhouse gases, and heavy metal and particulate matter emissions. Unlike many other industries, plastic manufacturing has actually increased production. Demand has increased and especially in the food industry to keep things sanitary. This increase in production is reflective of the increase in waste. <br/>Although restaurants have implemented their own sustainable initiatives to combat their carbon footprint, the pandemic has unfortunately forced restaurants to digress. For example, Just Salad, a fast-food restaurant chain, incentivized customers with discounted meals to use reusable bowls which saved over 75,000 pounds of plastic per year. However, when the pandemic hit, the company halted the program to pivot towards takeout and delivery. This effect is apparent on an international scale. Singapore was in lock-down for eight weeks and during that time, 1,470 tons of takeout and food delivery plastic waste was thrown out. In addition, the Hong Kong environmental group Greeners Action surveyed 2,000 people in April and the results showed that people are ordering out twice as much as last year, doubling the use of plastic.<br/>However, is this surge of plastic usage necessary in the food industry or are there methods that can be used to reduce the amount of waste production? The COVID-19 pandemic caused a fracture in the food system’s supply chain, involving food, factory, and farm. This thesis will strive to tackle such topics by analyzing the supply chains of the food industry and identify areas for sustainable opportunities. These recommendations will help to identify areas for green improvement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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A supply chain analysis on the food industry’s surge of waste in response to COVID-19

Description

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a great need for United States’ restaurants to “go green” due to consumers’ habits of frequently eating out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has caused this initiative to lose traction. While the amount of customers ordering takeout has increased, there is less emphasis on sustainability.<br/>Plastic is known for its harmful effects on the environment and the extreme length of time it takes to decompose. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), almost 8 million tons of plastic end up in the oceans at an annual rate, threatening not only the safety of marine species, but also human health. Modern food packaging materials have included a blend of synthetic ingredients, trickling into our daily lives and polluting the air, water, and land. Single-use plastic items slowly degrade into microplastics and can take up to hundreds of years to biodegrade.<br/>Due to COVID-19, restaurants have switched to takeout and delivery options to adapt to the new business environment and guidelines enforced by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) mandated guidelines.<br/>Some of these guidelines include: notices encouraging social distancing and mask-wearing, mandated masks for employees, and easy access to sanitary supplies.<br/>This cultural shift is motivating restaurants to search for a quick, cheap, and easy fix to adapt to the increased demand of take-out and delivery methods. This increases their plastic consumption of items such as plastic bags/paper bags, styrofoam containers, and beverage cups. Plastic is the most popular takeout material because of its price and durability as well as allowing for limited contamination and easy disposability.<br/>Almost all food products come in packaging and this, more often than not, is single use. Food is the largest market out of all the packaging industry, maintaining roughly two thirds of material going to food. The US Environmental Protection Agency reports that almost half of all municipal solid waste is made up of food and food packaging materials. In 2014, over 162 million tons of packaging material waste were generated in the states. This typically contains toxic inks and dyes that leach into groundwater and soil. When degrading, pieces of plastic absorb toxins like PCBs and pesticides, and then each piece will in turn release toxic chemicals like Bisphenol A. Even before being thrown away, it causes negative effects for the environment. The creation of packaging materials uses many resources such as petroleum and chemicals and then releases toxic byproducts. Such byproducts include sludge containing contaminants, greenhouse gases, and heavy metal and particulate matter emissions. Unlike many other industries, plastic manufacturing has actually increased production. Demand has increased and especially in the food industry to keep things sanitary. This increase in production is reflective of the increase in waste. <br/>Although restaurants have implemented their own sustainable initiatives to combat their carbon footprint, the pandemic has unfortunately forced restaurants to digress. For example, Just Salad, a fast-food restaurant chain, incentivized customers with discounted meals to use reusable bowls which saved over 75,000 pounds of plastic per year. However, when the pandemic hit, the company halted the program to pivot towards takeout and delivery. This effect is apparent on an international scale. Singapore was in lock-down for eight weeks and during that time, 1,470 tons of takeout and food delivery plastic waste was thrown out. In addition, the Hong Kong environmental group Greeners Action surveyed 2,000 people in April and the results showed that people are ordering out twice as much as last year, doubling the use of plastic.<br/>However, is this surge of plastic usage necessary in the food industry, or are there methods that can be used to reduce the amount of waste production? The COVID-19 pandemic caused a fracture in the food system’s supply chain, involving food, factory, and farm. This thesis will strive to tackle such topics by analyzing the supply chains of the food industry and identify areas for sustainable opportunities. These recommendations will help to identify areas for green improvement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05