Matching Items (16)

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IN SEARCH OF TRANSFORMATIVE MOMENTS: BLENDING COMMUNITY BUILDING PURSUITS INTO LIFELONG LEARNING EXPERIENCES

Description

This article presents an exploration of the relationship between community building and lifelong learning. Using a reflective style, the authors propose that the fusion of community building principles with lifelong

This article presents an exploration of the relationship between community building and lifelong learning. Using a reflective style, the authors propose that the fusion of community building principles with lifelong learning practice can positively transform educational practice. Seven positive pursuits are highlighted regarding their potential to assist the implementation of community building into lifelong learning programs: (1) asset-based thinking; (2) critical reflection; (3) systems thinking; (4) cognitive vibrancy, (5) inclusiveness; (6) creative expression; and, (7) purpose in life. These pursuits draw upon the power of the community development field to bring about more positive transformative moments for individuals and communities participating in lifelong learning programs. The metaphor of bread making is used to illustrate how such transformative moments occur and why they are meaningful to individuals pursuing lifelong learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Accessibility and Inclusion in Learning Management System Design: Creating an Online Learning Platform for Lifelong Learners

Description

As the impact of technology on daily life continues to grow, online learning platforms for primary, secondary, post-secondary, and professional institutions find ways to:

1. Connect peers and instructors through digital

As the impact of technology on daily life continues to grow, online learning platforms for primary, secondary, post-secondary, and professional institutions find ways to:

1. Connect peers and instructors through digital communication.
2. Engage users more fully in learning.
3. Provide access to resources that enhance deep-impact education.

Online learning platforms, or learning management systems (LMS), are used to connect instructors and students through synchronous and asynchronous engagement tools, provide space for the transfer of resources and ideas, and track progress. However, these platforms were designed with more mainstream purposes - and more digitally savvy - users in mind.

Adult learning programs (with members ages 50+) currently have no online learning and sharing platform specifically designed to fit the needs and desires of their users. Despite the multitude of barriers to successful use, adult learning programs recognize the need to engage with members digitally and are seeking an online learning platform centered around their users.

This project, utilizing best practices in technical communication and mixed methods user experience research, broadens the boundaries of communication design by creating an online learning platform prototype specifically for adults ages 50+ through the lens of information design, content management, and user experience outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-11-11

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Steps for Improving Quality of Placemaking on Roosevelt Row

Description

Surrounded by a developmental boom in downtown Phoenix, Roosevelt Row fights to maintain the local art influence and historic character. An earthy community of street artists, coffee drinkers, band tees,

Surrounded by a developmental boom in downtown Phoenix, Roosevelt Row fights to maintain the local art influence and historic character. An earthy community of street artists, coffee drinkers, band tees, nose rings, vinyl collectors and rolled denim, the people are facing dramatic urbanization. The hum of drills, hammers, cranes and alarms sound throughout the viscidity, echoing the construction of a new era downtown. In the interest of better understanding the developmental process, resident needs and community, this research project evaluates successful public spaces and similar downtown areas in the United States, synthesized their elements of prosperity in comparison to general attributes of quality public spaces, and implemented the concepts and ideas into Roosevelt Row. This provided the researcher with knowledge of quality public spaces, why public space is important, and how placemaking is routinely accomplished. This also equipped the researcher with the tools to participate in ethnography and collect observational data to learn about Roosevelt Row. The researcher then combined learned material with what she observed on the Row, to condense the artists' district developmental needs into nine proposals for bettering the Row in the immediate, near and long-term future. The study begs to answer the question: is Roosevelt Row a Place or a place? Observation, residential and visitor engagement with the space; locality, pleasurability, inclusiveness and safety of the public spaces; and relationship between residents and quality of space all contribute to the space's qualifications. While Roosevelt Row has the potential and assets to become a Place, especially if the nine proposals are implemented. However, at the time of research, the space is between place and Place.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

Tempe Late Night

Description

Tempe Late Night is a student run weekly variety comedy show at Arizona State University. The show tapes weekly in front of a live student audience and publishes videos online.

Tempe Late Night is a student run weekly variety comedy show at Arizona State University. The show tapes weekly in front of a live student audience and publishes videos online. The show specifically tackles better representing student perspectives at ASU. Additionally, Tempe Late Night also strives to provide an un-censored real take on college life. Tempe Late Night focuses on reaching a broad audience of students, local and nationwide.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Evaluating the Effectiveness of Current Curriculum: A Collaboration between Citizenship Counts and the Community Action Research Experiences Program

Description

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) collaborated with Citizenship Counts, a local non-profit organization that provides free civics curriculum to middle and high school teachers nationwide, to evaluate the effectiveness of

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) collaborated with Citizenship Counts, a local non-profit organization that provides free civics curriculum to middle and high school teachers nationwide, to evaluate the effectiveness of the current curriculum and create additional curriculum materials. Data were collected over a three-month period through online and paper surveys distributed to teachers who had used some aspect of the Citizenship Counts curriculum previously. Of the teachers contacted, nineteen responded with completed surveys. The results indicate that teachers are pleased with their experience working with Citizenship Counts, but that there were areas where improvements could be made. The additional curriculum materials created were quizzes, which can be added to the Citizenship Counts curriculum as an additional improvement. The main areas of concern from teachers were the Citizenship Counts website and additional help when planning Naturalization Ceremonies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Creating an Environment for Empathy in the Classroom

Description

Empathy is a characteristic fully developed and manifested in one creature: the human being. In February 2011, we saw the supercomputer, Watson, challenge highly intelligent human beings on Jeopardy. The

Empathy is a characteristic fully developed and manifested in one creature: the human being. In February 2011, we saw the supercomputer, Watson, challenge highly intelligent human beings on Jeopardy. The human beings put up a brutal battle of wits but ultimately, the computer was declared victor. Scientists have made remarkable leaps when it comes to creating artificial intelligence. We have "smart" phones that sit in the palm of our hand and can do far more than what we expected of bulky desktops in the 90s.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012-12

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Out-migration in Kumaon: are Van Panchayats (forest councils) socially resilient?

Description

What happens to community-based institutions (CBIs) when persistent out-migration changes the socio-demographic structures in the community? This question needs exploration in the context of increasing urbanization in the developing countries,

What happens to community-based institutions (CBIs) when persistent out-migration changes the socio-demographic structures in the community? This question needs exploration in the context of increasing urbanization in the developing countries, where a substantial population depends on forests for subsistence livelihoods. In pursuance of this question, Almora district in India provided the necessary conditions of high out-migration, and the presence of oldest surviving CBIs of forest management (locally called as Van Panchayats or VPs). Framing the research question as social resilience of VPs amidst high out-migration, a representative sample of six VPs in Almora was investigated. Factors considered crucial to social resilience were analyzed by using qualitative and quantitative techniques on primary data collected through household surveys (n=111) and secondary data from authentic sources. Results, organized by three levels of analysis, highlight: 1) community - low participation, particularly of women, in proceedings of VPs, and a transition away from forest-based livelihoods; 2) institutional (VPs) - low adaptability to changes in gendered composition and a shift away from the community-specific needs; and, 3) policy - reduced use and access of forest resources for the community, and curtailed autonomy of VPs. The findings suggest that out-migration is one among the multiple factors, and its impacts on VPs are mediated by the broader political economy around VPs, thus obviating a linear causal relationship. Therefore, the findings arguably inform policy and future research by highlighting linkages between diverse contextual factors at the regional and community level, and the points of concern for social resilience of VPs, with particular focus on out-migration.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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The influence of import substitution on community development as measured by economic wealth and quality of life

Description

The purpose of this research is to connect community development and local economic development to determine the impacts of the local economy on economic wealth and quality of life. This

The purpose of this research is to connect community development and local economic development to determine the impacts of the local economy on economic wealth and quality of life. This will be explored through a community development lens examining how the community, and its location and capitals (specifically economic, social and human capitals), impact the dependent capital variables. Laughlin’s (2012) research design of social capital and its impact on economic wealth used United States county samples, which reflect many local economies. This dissertation builds on Laughlin’s model and explores local economies at a Zip Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) level. It also incorporates elements of Chaskin’s (2001) model, which explores community capacity as social and human capital, Benhabib and Spiegel’s (1994) human capital model, Levine and Renelt’s (1992) economic capital model, Krugman’s location and economic geography (1998), Emory and Flora’s community capital framework (2006), and concepts of quality of life and economic wealth by Schumacher (1964) and Jacobs, (1970). Economic wealth and higher quality of life can represent community development outcomes; there must be a balance within community systems and an exploration of these capitals (Emory and Flora, 2006).

This research expands beyond exploring impacts of social capital on economic wealth to include multiple community capitals. Furthermore, it tests economic measurements and their impact on a local economic level as opposed to a regional/state level, thus providing a deeper understanding of local economies and their impact on communities.

This dissertation provides a new baseline for understanding the relationship between community and economic development, its specific connections and the overall impacts of local economic activity. This will allow a richer exploration into economic activity and perspectives about how economic policy may impact communities. Research and literature has shown the immense advantages of strong local economies in contrast to regional/state economies and globalization; this will provide the necessary research bridge to connect with community development. The outcome of this research explains the impacts of economic, social and human capital on economic wealth and quality, specifically within local economies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Conceptualizing social capital and active transportation to school through a social-ecological model

Description

Active transportation to school (ATS) has received an increasing amount of attention over the past decade due to its promising health contributions. Most of the existing research that surrounds ATS

Active transportation to school (ATS) has received an increasing amount of attention over the past decade due to its promising health contributions. Most of the existing research that surrounds ATS investigates factors from the physical environment as well as factors from the individual perspective that influence walking and biking to school. This research attempts to add to the existing knowledge by exploring the impact that social relationships within the neighborhood have on ATS.

A model, based on social ecological theory, was presented and tested to examine elements thought to influence ATS. A logistic regression analysis was run to determine the odds of students walking or biking based on the influence of each construct within the model. Results indicated that the physical and socio-cultural constructs were directly and significantly related to ATS behavior while the construct of safety had an indirect effect. These findings support the idea that there are several factors that operate within and across different ecological levels to influence the mode of transportation to school. Therefore, programs to promote ATS should involve multi-level strategies. In addition to the physical environment, interventions should address interpersonal relationships within the family, school, and neighborhood.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

Latino Male Community College Student Intentions to Graduate: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

Description

As of 2018, 61% of all jobs in Arizona require additional training/education beyond the high school diploma. With only 35% of Arizona’s population holding a post-secondary degree, there is high

As of 2018, 61% of all jobs in Arizona require additional training/education beyond the high school diploma. With only 35% of Arizona’s population holding a post-secondary degree, there is high demand and need for more Arizonans to complete degrees or certificates in the coming years. As the largest minority population in the state and one-third of the college-aged population, Latinx students are not successfully attaining these degrees. While Latinx degree attainment has increased, this increase was due primarily to higher rates of high school and degree completion of Latinas. Of those Latino males that continue to post-secondary education, the majority (71%) will enroll at the community college level. However, the road to academic success at community college is dim. Despite their high enrollment rates at community college, 13% will leave after their first year, 35.2% after their second, and 56.7% after six years (Urias & Wood, 2015).

Research on Latino males in higher education has been primarily focused on access, persistence, and retention at the university level. Further, research has been centered on identity, critical race theory, language behaviors, and engagement of Latino males in higher education. Little to no research has been done to identify the factors, characteristics, or the internal will that propels a Latino male community college student to complete their degree. This research is intended to contribute to this void in research, utilizing a human behavioral theoretical approach to address the phenomena of Latino male attrition.

This exploratory mixed method research approach incorporated both qualitative and quantitative instruments to test the validity of the Theory of Planned Behavior as a plausible model to assess intention of Latino males to graduate from community college. The research examined whether intention to graduate could be assessed on the behavioral beliefs associated with a Latino male’s attitude, perceived norms, and their perceived behavioral controls towards completing a degree. Further, the research sought to determine that if the theory could accurately assess intention, could the model assess differences in intention for first-year versus second-year students, and currently enrolled students versus those who have dropped out. The premise was that if the theory is an acceptable model to predict intention, the study could also model behavioral interventions to support Latino male student persistence and completion.

The results indicate that the Theory of Planned Behavior is an acceptable model to assess and predict behavioral beliefs that drive Latino male intention to graduate from community college. Latino male students’ attitudes toward degree attainment is the most significant factor in predicting their intention to graduate. Additionally, behavioral beliefs of enrolled students are significantly different than their peers who dropped out. However, there is no significant difference in the behavioral beliefs of students in their first-year of enrollment versus those in their second-year of enrollment.

Using the theory’s behavioral intervention implementation strategy, the research provided implications for practice that support Latino male student recruitment, retention, and completion measures for community colleges. Additionally, the research provides implications for future research that supports more studies on Latino male community college degree attainment, and for preparing more Latino men for the workforce needs of Arizona.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020