Matching Items (18)

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Community Cohesion in Refugee Youth in School Environments

Description

Looking into the school community cohesion and how refugee youth integrate into schools is important when addressing refugee resettlement issues at large. It is important that school community identity (SCI)

Looking into the school community cohesion and how refugee youth integrate into schools is important when addressing refugee resettlement issues at large. It is important that school community identity (SCI) formation for refugee high school youth is understood in order to develop school programs that can better assist integration process of refugee families. Looking at high school refugee youth from Arizona a model was created that better displays the specifics this study found when dealing with this population. Unlike non-refugee high school youth, refugee youth do not develop school community cohesion through voice, resonance, or empowerment like other studies have shown. This study shows that they must first develop a SCI before they can have a strong school community presence. School community identity is an important first step that facilitates sense of school community. Two focus groups were down at the Somali American United Council, and from these two groups four common themes surfaced: faculty support, emotional security, cultural understanding, and partnership/collaboration. Using these themes a refugee school identity model was created to represent the data collected. The participants in the focus group often told stories and used phrases that indicated a lack of identity in their school, and no claims to a need of a voice within their school community was mentioned. This indicates that refugee students need an identity within their school community before they will express a need for voice or influence.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Beyond Numbers: Assessing the Impact of RISE Tutoring on the Phoenix Refugee Community

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RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the

RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the researcher sought to document and analyze the program’s impact on the Phoenix refugee community. It was determined that video documentation, with its ability to capture both visual and verbal testimony, was the ideal holistic approach to assess and share this impact. The researcher hypothesized that RISE Tutoring adds value to the lives of its tutors and students through the multidimensional growth––educational, personal, and cultural––it facilitates for all. Methods of data collection were limited to video and audio, but approval from the Institutional Review Board and consent from all participants were obtained prior to the project’s start. The final video, filmed and edited with the help of a professional videographer, was 20 minutes and 21 seconds in length. The findings derived from the recorded interviews with students, tutors, and community leaders, and from the footage of tutoring and group activities, validated the researcher’s hypothesis. Viewers of the video can witness the bonding of tutors and students; hear the pride in the voices of the tutors and see the passion in their eyes when they speak of their students; and feel the joy and excitement that the program brings to its students’ lives. This project transformed the personal experiences of participants into a collective RISE Tutoring identity which can now be presented, for the first time, to the public. The video also aimed to help RISE Tutoring share its meaningful work and improve its marketing efforts, thereby enabling the organization to recruit more tutors and students, build new partnerships, and fundraise. Through the fulfillment of these goals, the video will empower the organization to effect greater change in the community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Barriers Refugee Women Face When Accessing Healthcare: A Review of Current Available Solutions

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Currently, refugee women’s access to healthcare is a major topic of research. Refugee women face many barriers when attempting to access healthcare, and this paper aims to complete a systematic

Currently, refugee women’s access to healthcare is a major topic of research. Refugee women face many barriers when attempting to access healthcare, and this paper aims to complete a systematic review of the results of studies published from 2009 to 2019 that investigate what specific best solutions have been put in place globally to combat struggles refugee women face while trying to obtain healthcare, identify common underlying themes, and see how these solutions can be applied to countries caring for refugees. Twelve total articles were reviewed and four main themes emerged: women’s care, mental health, health professional perspective, and community. From these four main themes, three crucial ideas emerged: culturally competent care, team-based care, and trust between patient and provider. The results showed that to improve access to healthcare for refugee women: health professionals must receive cultural sensitivity training to provide culturally competent care, team-based care must be implemented to improve patient adherence and satisfaction, and trust between the patient and provider is key to allowing refugee women feel safe enough to seek out healthcare. Culturally competent team-based care based on physician-patient trust needs to be more thoroughly adapted globally to provide care that is sensitive and empowering for refugee women, and all patients. However, these strategies will need to be further studied to determine their impact on refugee women’s health literacy & healthcare experience.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Resettlement and self-sufficiency: refugees' perceptions of social entrepreneurship in Arizona

Description

This research examined the perceptions of refugees towards social entrepreneurship in Arizona through focus group discussions with 77 members of the refugee communities that have been organized under nine groups.

This research examined the perceptions of refugees towards social entrepreneurship in Arizona through focus group discussions with 77 members of the refugee communities that have been organized under nine groups. Business experience, problem solving experience, conception of social entrepreneurship, examples, opportunities, support, and needs emerged as the themes of the study. Available opportunities as well as barriers for refugee social entrepreneurship based on the views of refugees in Arizona were explained. The difference between commercial entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship was highlighted and some examples of refugee social entrepreneurship described. Qualitative data analysis revealed that refugees in Arizona have entrepreneurial characteristics such as risk taking, hardworking, problem solving, and determination. They also have a good understanding of commercial entrepreneurship but very little understanding of social entrepreneurship. The findings underlined that social entrepreneurship can be used as a helpful strategy for self-sufficiency of refugees residing in Arizona. Given their life trajectories, refugees in Arizona have high potential to be social entrepreneurs with the right exposure and training. If supported adequately and planned appropriately, the refugee social entrepreneurship project can lead to self-sufficiency and faster integration of participating individuals to the mainstream society. The findings may spark interest among practitioners, policy makers, and scholars. It may redefine refugee social work practices as the passion of enterprising empowers refugees and helps them to discover self-confidence and rebrand their image. Policy makers may consider incorporating refugee social entrepreneurship in to the current self-sufficiency plan for refugee resettlement. Future research needs to investigate how refugee social entrepreneurs can be successful and focus on the measurement of their success.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African refugee middle school students in a southwest U.S. state

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ABSTRACT This study examined the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a metropolitan area of the United States Southwest. The research questions underpinning

ABSTRACT This study examined the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a metropolitan area of the United States Southwest. The research questions underpinning this study included: What are the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a southwestern U.S. state? 1a) How do they view their relationships with their teachers and peers? 1b) Can they identify a teacher or school staff member in their school community who is a significant resource for them? and 1c) What factors contribute to their challenges and successes in their school community? This qualitative study documented and analyzed the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled refugee middle school students, who are relatively new to the U.S. educational system. Purposive and convenience sampling were sources utilized in selecting participants for this study. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to capture the stories of 10 resettled sub-Saharan African refugee students enrolled in 7th and 8th grade, who have lived in the U.S. not more than 10 years and not less than three years. Among the participants, half were male and half female. They came from six countries: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Somalia. Findings of the study revealed six major themes: teachers' helpfulness, positive perceptions of school, friends as resources at school, disruptive students in the classroom, need for better teachers, and before and after school activities. Overall, the participants in the study expressed a positive perception of their teachers and their schools, yet presented a dichotomous view of their schooling experiences and perceptions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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The Dual Victimization of Failed Asylum Seekers in the United States Repatriations Process

Description

The asylum seeking process in the United States is arbitrary in nature, many aspects of which have been well documented. The legal process rests the burden of proof upon the

The asylum seeking process in the United States is arbitrary in nature, many aspects of which have been well documented. The legal process rests the burden of proof upon the asylum seeker to demonstrate he or she is truly fleeing persecution to a legal system where asylum seekers are not eligible for free representation. This contributes to a lower rate of success and an uncertain future, due to the limited or no access to employment, education, and health benefits, within the country in which they seek asylum. However, the academic literature pertaining to the repatriation process of the failed asylum seeker in the United States remains relatively unexplored. Consequently, the true failure rate remains unknown. This paper contends that genuine asylum seekers may fall through the cracks, unable to show evidence of their persecution. Thus, repatriations result in a dual victimization of the failed asylum seeker resulting in situations where a genuine case can be exposed to the very same dangers he or she fled in the first place. This is a grave violation of their human rights and the principle of Non-refoulement.

Therefore, this paper argues the theory of the Marginalized Other in Human Rights Law (Simmons 2011) can be extended to the repatriations process of failed asylum seekers in the United States. Using secondary data and reports this thesis breaks down the repatriations process into three components in order to demonstrate how the failed asylum seeker is treated as a Marginalized Other during each point of contact. By addressing the victimization that occurs during the repatriations process this paper concludes the threat posed to the human rights of failed asylum seekers can be minimized.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Exploring Health and Wellness for Syrian Refugees

Description

The number of refugees experiencing displacement is 25.9 million worldwide, with the majority in the last 7 years from Syria. While international government organizations and researchers have called for assessment

The number of refugees experiencing displacement is 25.9 million worldwide, with the majority in the last 7 years from Syria. While international government organizations and researchers have called for assessment of refugee health and wellness, research in this vulnerable population is limited. This dissertation is built around humanizing refugee research on health and wellness. The introduction in Chapter 1 provides an overview for the three resulting chapters which are (a) a grounded theory study to gain insight into the lives of Syrian refugees living in displacement; (b) a systematic literature review on wellness in Syrian refugees in displacement; and (c) a concept analysis to examine wellness from the perspective of Syrian refugee women within the context of displacement. Chapter 5 includes the summary, discussion, and recommendations for future research.

Chapter 2 consists of three themes which shaped the lives of Syrian refugees during displacement: (a) assets and deficits; (b) official obstacles and supports; and (c) unofficial obstacles and supports. Health emerged as a priority for the refugees which included many dimensions related to the quality of their health and health needs. The results of Chapter 2 precipitated in using wellness as a holistic lens to view Syrian refugee’s health and health needs in Chapter 3. The results of Chapter 3 added a more holistic view of Syrian refugee health, while highlighting the need for improved research methods addressing wellness in Syrian refugees. Chapter 4 clarifies and defines wellness from the perspective of Syrian refugee women.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Bonding over the love of soccer is no joke: a mixed method study exploring sense of community, resilience, and cultural adjustment for refugee youth participants

Description

Resettled refugees face numerous challenges including unsafe living conditions, loss of permanent shelter, adjustment to a new culture, loneliness, and separation from family, friends, and community. Of particular importance is

Resettled refugees face numerous challenges including unsafe living conditions, loss of permanent shelter, adjustment to a new culture, loneliness, and separation from family, friends, and community. Of particular importance is the lack of a feeling of sense of community (SOC) within their new surroundings. SOC is not only worthwhile as an outcome of its own, but may also predict additional positive outcomes such as resilience and cultural adjustment. Literature has shown participation in sport can develop youth positively and build social skills, while studies in other regions of the world have also found a sport team setting to be a place for immigrants to experience SOC. In this study, I use a congruent mixed methods approach to both explore the experience of SOC for youth refugees in a soccer club, and examine the relation of SOC to resilience and cultural adjustment. Using photo-elicitation and semi-structured interviews with 11 youth participants, the qualitative portion of the study explored SOC among youth participants. Findings note the presence of SOC as matched to theoretical frameworks both specific to sport, and to a more general theory of SOC. Further data were collected through questionnaires distributed to club members. Results from the quantitative analysis indicate a significant positive relation between SOC and resilience, and SOC and perceived acculturation. This study’s contribution is to illustrate how refugee youth in a sport club in the United States experience SOC, and the impact of that SOC. Results suggest practical implications for sport managers who wish to provide positive sport experiences for youth refugees.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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A Social Welfare Policy Analysis of Substance Abuse in the Russian Federation

Description

The implementation of substance abuse treatment policy is ambiguous in the Russian Federation. Though policies are in place, financial responsibility and best practice procedures are largely overlooked by the Russian

The implementation of substance abuse treatment policy is ambiguous in the Russian Federation. Though policies are in place, financial responsibility and best practice procedures are largely overlooked by the Russian government. The purpose of this thesis is to conduct a policy analysis of the Russian Federation Federal Law, On Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, adopted December 10, 1997. Amendments and additions to this law are integrated. Utilizing Gilbert and Terrell’s (2005) elements of an analytic social policy, including allocation, provision, delivery, and finance, the extent of substance abuse treatment provision is analyzed in the Russian context. Result indicate limited Russian government provision of detoxification for drug and alcohol users, with a nearly absent continuum required for true rehabilitation. The Russian government must provide harm reduction measurements to protect the population from HIV/AIDS. Involving the Russian Orthodox Church in advocacy for the implementation of harm reduction measures is recommended.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017