Matching Items (3)

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Techniques for Wideband All Digital Polar Transmission

Description

Modern Communication systems are progressively moving towards all-digital transmitters (ADTs) due to their high efficiency and potentially large frequency range. While significant work has been done on individual blocks within

Modern Communication systems are progressively moving towards all-digital transmitters (ADTs) due to their high efficiency and potentially large frequency range. While significant work has been done on individual blocks within the ADT, there are few to no full systems designs at this point in time. The goal of this work is to provide a set of multiple novel block architectures which will allow for greater cohesion between the various ADT blocks. Furthermore, the design of these architectures are expected to focus on the practicalities of system design, such as regulatory compliance, which here to date has largely been neglected by the academic community. Amongst these techniques are a novel upconverted phase modulation, polyphase harmonic cancellation, and process voltage and temperature (PVT) invariant Delta Sigma phase interpolation. It will be shown in this work that the implementation of the aforementioned architectures allows ADTs to be designed with state of the art size, power, and accuracy levels, all while maintaining PVT insensitivity. Due to the significant performance enhancement over previously published works, this work presents the first feasible ADT architecture suitable for widespread commercial deployment.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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High speed CMOS image sensor

Description

High speed image sensors are used as a diagnostic tool to analyze high speed processes for industrial, automotive, defense and biomedical application. The high fame rate of these sensors, capture

High speed image sensors are used as a diagnostic tool to analyze high speed processes for industrial, automotive, defense and biomedical application. The high fame rate of these sensors, capture a series of images that enables the viewer to understand and analyze the high speed phenomena. However, the pixel readout circuits designed for these sensors with a high frame rate (100fps to 1 Mfps) have a very low fill factor which are less than 58%. For high speed operation, the exposure time is less and (or) the light intensity incident on the image sensor is less. This makes it difficult for the sensor to detect faint light signals and gives a lower limit on the signal levels being detected by the sensor. Moreover, the leakage paths in the pixel readout circuit also sets a limit on the signal level being detected. Therefore, the fill factor of the pixel should be maximized and the leakage currents in the readout circuits should be minimized.

This thesis work presents the design of the pixel readout circuit suitable for high speed and low light imaging application. The circuit is an improvement to the 6T pixel readout architecture. The designed readout circuit minimizes the leakage currents in the circuit and detects light producing a signal level of 350µV at the cathode of the photodiode. A novel layout technique is used for the pixel, which improves the fill factor of the pixel to 64.625%. The read out circuit designed is an integral part of high speed image sensor, which is fabricated using a 0.18 µm CMOS technology with the die size of 3.1mm x 3.4 mm, the pixel size of 20µm x 20 µm, number of pixel of 96 x 96 and four 10-bit pipelined ADC’s. The image sensor achieves a high frame rate of 10508 fps and readout speed of 96 M pixels / sec.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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GaN-on-Si RF switched mode power amplifiers for non-constant envelope signals

Description

This work implements three switched mode power amplifier topologies namely inverse class-D (CMCD), push-pull class-E and inverse push-pull class-E, in a GaN-on-Si process for medium power level (5-10W) femto/pico-cells base-station

This work implements three switched mode power amplifier topologies namely inverse class-D (CMCD), push-pull class-E and inverse push-pull class-E, in a GaN-on-Si process for medium power level (5-10W) femto/pico-cells base-station applications. The presented power amplifiers address practical implementation design constraints and explore the fundamental performance limitations of switched-mode power amplifiers for cellular band. The designs are analyzed and compared with respect to non-idealities like finite on-resistance, finite-Q of inductors, bond-wire effects, input signal duty cycle, and supply and component variations. These architectures are designed for non-constant envelope inputs in the form of digitally modulated signals such as RFPWM, which undergo duty cycle variation. After comparing the three topologies, this work concludes that the inverse push-pull class-E power amplifier shows lower efficiency degradation at reduced duty cycles. For GaN based discrete power amplifiers which have less drain capacitance compared to GaAs or CMOS and where the switch loss is dominated by wire-bonds, an inverse push-pull class-E gives highest output power at highest efficiency. Push-pull class-E can give efficiencies comparable to inverse push-pull class-E in presence of bondwires on tuning the Zero-Voltage Switching (ZVS) network components but at a lower output power. Current-Mode Class-D (CMCD) is affected most by the presence of bondwires and gives least output power and efficiency compared to other two topologies. For systems dominated by drain capacitance loss or which has no bondwires, the CMCD and push-pull class-E gives better output power than inverse push-pull class-E. However, CMCD is more suitable for high breakdown voltage process.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015