Matching Items (8)

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A Trauma-Informed Intervention Using Mindfulness to Improve Early Childhood Classroom Environments.

Description

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or neglect that occur before the age of 18. Some of the effects of ACEs include anxiety, depression, increased stress, increase in high-risk behaviors, and early death. Mindfulness practices have been shown to be an effective tool in reducing some of these symptoms. In looking for ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of ACEs, it is important to provide tools and resources to the adults taking care of children including; parents, guardians, and teachers.

The purpose of this evidence based project (EBP) was to evaluate mindfulness and classroom environments after the implementation of a mindfulness intervention. The intervention consisted of a three day training followed by four weeks of mindfulness practice prior to beginning the school day. Ten preschool and Early Head Start teachers from seven classrooms at a school in inner city Phoenix participated in the project. Utilizing the Five Factors Mindfulness Questionnaire pre and post intervention, a paired sample t-test showed a significant increase in two factors of mindfulness. The CLASS tool was used to assess classroom environment pre and post intervention and showed significant improvement in five classes. These findings support ongoing mindfulness training and practice for preschool and Early Head Start teachers to improve classroom environments.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-01

The Effects of Modifiable Risk Factor Video Education on Self-Efficacy in Adults with Atrial Fibrillation

Description

Atrial fibrillation, also known as Afib or AF, is the most common irregular heart rhythm among the United States adult population. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by an abnormal fibrillation of

Atrial fibrillation, also known as Afib or AF, is the most common irregular heart rhythm among the United States adult population. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by an abnormal fibrillation of the upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria. When left chronically untreated, this condition may lead to insufficient systemic blood flow or the formation of blood clots. Atrial fibrillation has many modifiable risk factors, meaning contributing habits and practices within the patient's control that may worsen the condition. Communication of these modifiable risk factors to patients with atrial fibrillation is important in improving patient quality of life and for reduction of disease symptoms. The motivation for this study was to convey the potential of improved disease process by lifestyle modification to patients with atrial fibrillation.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Examining Health Professionals' Breastfeeding Knowledge

Description

Breastfeeding has been shown to dramatically improve health outcomes for both infants and mothers. Despite recommendations by almost all world and national health organizations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months

Breastfeeding has been shown to dramatically improve health outcomes for both infants and mothers. Despite recommendations by almost all world and national health organizations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months and to continue breastfeeding for one year, this goal is not met by the majority of women in the United States for multiple reasons. Health professionals, including physicians and nurses, can play a major role in educating and influencing mothers about breastfeeding, especially for women with comorbidities, taking medications, or undergoing medical procedures. An online survey was created to evaluate healthcare professionals' breastfeeding knowledge and opinions at a large hospital in Phoenix, Arizona using QuestionPro software. This survey was distributed for three weeks to the nursing and physician departments at the hospital in primarily the obstetric and post partum units. Of the seventy-nine individuals who completed the survey, the respondents were primarily female obstetric nurses. Respondents recognized the benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and infant, believed health professionals can influence the decision to breastfeed, and found a lack of support was the number one reason women discontinue breastfeeding. Despite this information, it is apparent from this survey, and similar studies in the past, that there are significant gaps in knowledge especially when it comes to contraindications to breastfeeding, medications used while breastfeeding, fluid intake during breastfeeding, and foods that can be consumed while breastfeeding. Additionally, the majority of the nurses who completed this survey did not believe their schooling adequately trained them in breastfeeding education and hands-on practice. This information could be used in future studies to guide breastfeeding education for nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals at the stated hospital and other facilities across the nation.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Women's Awareness of Lactation Support Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA)

Description

The purpose of this cross-sectional questionnaire is to explore women’s awareness about the lactation support amendments under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the support they received from their insurance

The purpose of this cross-sectional questionnaire is to explore women’s awareness about the lactation support amendments under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the support they received from their insurance companies and employers based on the act. Using convenience sampling and snowball sampling, participants were recruited to participate in a survey through social media and flyers. The goals of this research are to examine the number of women who were 1) aware of the lactation support provisions under the ACA, 2) received breastfeeding support from insurance their health insurance with no cost sharing 3) received reasonable break time and a private space to express milk from their employers, and 4) if there were any challenges in receiving the support mandated under the ACA from their insurers and employers or lactation support in general. The results show that many women who responded to the survey were aware of the amendments under the ACA and many of those women did receive the benefits of the provisions. There were many common reasons for why women did not receive the support they desired. These underlying reasons prevent women from accessing lactation support and provide a challenging environment for women to continue breastfeeding their children.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Associations of depression, sleep, and acculturation on glycemic control in Korean Americans with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Description

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease affecting more than ten percent of the U.S. adults. Approximately 50 percent of people with diabetes fail to achieve glycemic targets

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease affecting more than ten percent of the U.S. adults. Approximately 50 percent of people with diabetes fail to achieve glycemic targets of A1C levels below seven percent. Poor glycemic control disproportionately affects minority populations such as Korean Americans (KAs). Successful diabetes self-management requires a comprehensive approach that takes into account depression, sleep, and acculturation to achieve good glycemic control. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the levels of glycemic control, depressive symptoms, sleep quality and duration, and acculturation; 2) examine an association of depressive symptoms with glycemic control; 3) identify mediational roles of sleep quality and sleep duration of less than 6 hours between depressive symptoms and glycemic control; and 4) explore a moderation role of acculturation between depressive symptoms and glycemic control in KAs with T2DM. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive correlational study. A total of 119 first generation KAs with T2DM were recruited from Korean communities in Arizona. A1C levels, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation scale, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and the Berlin Questionnaire were measured. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression analyses, path analyses, and the Sobel tests were conducted for data analyses of this study. Poor glycemic control (A1C ≥ 7 %), high depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16), poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5), and short sleep duration (< 6 hours) were prevalent among KAs with T2DM. The mean score of acculturation (2.18) indicated low acculturation to Western culture. Depressive symptoms were revealed as a significant independent predictor of glycemic control. Physical activity was negatively associated with glycemic control, while cultural identity was positively related to glycemic control. Sleep quality and sleep duration of less than 6 hours did not mediate the relationship between depressive symptoms and glycemic control. Acculturation did not moderate the association between depressive symptoms and glycemic control. Diabetes self-management interventions of a comprehensive approach that considers depressive symptoms, sleep problems, and cultural differences in minority populations with T2DM are needed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Critical care registered nurses' perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment

Description

This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to examine critical care registered nurses’ perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the extent to which education, nurses’ age, nursing degree, and

This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to examine critical care registered nurses’ perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the extent to which education, nurses’ age, nursing degree, and years of nursing experience is related to their perceptions on these topics. Professional comportment is comprised of nurses’ mutual respect, harmony in beliefs and actions, commitment, and collaboration. Yet, it was unknown whether a relationship existed between a civil or uncivil environment in the nursing profession and nurses’ professional comportment. Correlational analyses were conducted to explore the relationship between perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the relationships between incivility and professional comportment education and perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment. Results indicated statistically significant relationships between perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and between professional comportment education and perceptions of professional comportment. Professional comportment education was identified as a statistically significant predictor of increased perceptions of professional comportment. Findings of the current study may assist in establishing more targeted and innovative educational interventions to prevent, or better address, nurse-nurse incivility. Future research should more clearly define professional comportment education, test educational interventions that promote professional comportment in nurses, and further validate the Nurse-Nurse Collaboration Scale as a measure of nurses' professional comportment.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Burnout and Psychological Capital in Rural Critical Access Hospital Nurses

Description

Job burnout, a prolonged reaction to job stress, includes mental and physical aspects of exhaustion related to professional work life. Linked to individual health-related problems, decreased job satisfaction, poor organizational

Job burnout, a prolonged reaction to job stress, includes mental and physical aspects of exhaustion related to professional work life. Linked to individual health-related problems, decreased job satisfaction, poor organizational commitment, and higher turnover, burnout poses a problem for both employees and organizations. The nursing profession identifies the prevalence of burnout and the resulting harmful effects in many settings, yet until now, rural critical access hospital settings have not been considered. To build and maintain a competent, healthy rural nursing workforce that responds innovatively to growing healthcare needs, it is important to examine burnout levels in rural nurses and to identify factors that might be associated with mitigating burnout.

This study focuses on how psychological capital, socio-demographic and organizational work-related factors are associated with burnout in this population. This cross-sectional, descriptive correlational study employed the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Health Professionals, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire, and a sociodemographic questionnaire assessing individual and organizational work-related factors as self-report tools. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and regression analyses were performed to assess aspects of the nurses’ work environment, while describing the relationships among the variables.Means and standard deviations were examined across key variables and compared to reports from other studies. Hypotheses predicted psychological capital would be associated with burnout (negatively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, positively associated with personal accomplishment), and that individual sociodemographic and organizational work-related factors would also be associated with BO. It was further hypothesized that PsyCap would moderate the relationship between work-related factors and BO.

Maslach Burnout Inventory results reveal similar findings to those in the global sample. However, levels of emotional exhaustion and professional accomplishment were greater in our rural nurse sample compared to published values. Higher levels of psychological capital were found to be related to decreases in depersonalization and correlated to greater professional accomplishment. Psychological capital was not found to moderate associations within this study. Intent to stay more than one year had a strong, negative correlation with emotional exhaustion. The findings suggest burnout in this sample resembles that of the global problem and sets a baseline from which psychological capital trainings may be built.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Reliability of the Preterm Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) for the Late Preterm Infant Population

Description

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow many of these infants to avoid care in specialty nurseries and discharge home with their mothers after birth. Due to underlying immaturity, feeding difficulty is the most common issue LPIs experience, resulting in early breastfeeding cessation, increased risk for secondary diagnoses, and hospital readmission. The purpose of this study was to assess early breastfeeding behavior of LPIs, including testing inter-rater reliability of an assessment tool and the feeding patterns of infants over time. An extensive review of breastfeeding assessment tools resulted in the selection of the Premature Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) based on its reliability and validity in the preterm infant population. A convenience sample of LPI dyads was recruited and used to conduct inter-rater reliability testing of PIBBS. A longitudinal one-group non-experimental study was used for observational follow-up. A strong statistical agreement of PIBBS scores occurred between mothers and a healthcare professional (Cohen’s kappa values of items ranged from .776 to 1.000, p = <.001). Participants continued using the PIBBS tool after hospital discharge until their infants expected due dates (40 weeks adjusted age). T-test analyses were conducted to examine changes in scores over time indicating increase in item scores (p = .003 - .193). PIBBS appears to be a valid and reliable tool to assess breastfeeding among LPI dyads. Incorporation of PIBBS into a comprehensive plan of care could better support and protect breastfeeding among the LPI population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018