Matching Items (5)

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Binge Drinking Behaviors among College Fraternity Members: An Exploration Using Theory of Planned Behavior

Description

Research indicates members of college Fraternities binge drinking at higher rates than their peers. Given the health and social consequences of binge drinking, it may be beneficial to explore binge

Research indicates members of college Fraternities binge drinking at higher rates than their peers. Given the health and social consequences of binge drinking, it may be beneficial to explore binge drinking behaviors in this specific population. This study examined if the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) predicts binge drinking behaviors of Fraternity students at Arizona State University. In a cross-sectional design, male Fraternity members (n=49) completed an online survey measuring their drinking behaviors and associated constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior (i.e. attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms, behavioral control, and self-efficacy). Results indicated all participants reported drinking alcohol over the previous 30 days. TPB variables of attitudes (r =.658, p <0.01), subjective norms (r =.384, p <0.01), and self-efficacy (r =.487, p <.01) were significantly associated with the construct of intention to binge drink. Variables of descriptive norms (r=-.045, p>.05) and perceived control (r=-.060, p>.05) were not significantly associated with intention to binge drink. Binge drinking intention (r =.538, p <0.01) was also significantly associated with binge drinking behaviors in this population. Findings indicate favorably for TPB to describe binge drinking behaviors in University Fraternity students. Researchers designing interventions to prevent binge drinking may consider targeting TPB constructs attitudes, subjective norms, and self-efficacy, as the current study indicates these are important factors associated with intention to binge drink, as well as actual binge drinking behaviors.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Incorporating religion and spirituality into the design of community-based physical activity programs for African American women: a qualitative inquiry

Description

Objective
Limited research has examined how aspects of religion and spirituality can be incorporated into community-based physical activity programs delivered outside of religious institutions. The purpose of this study was

Objective
Limited research has examined how aspects of religion and spirituality can be incorporated into community-based physical activity programs delivered outside of religious institutions. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore how spirituality and religion can be leveraged in the design of community-based physical activity programs for African American women delivered outside of faith-based or faith-placed settings.
Results
Three focus groups were conducted were conducted with 23 African American women (M age = 37.8 years, M BMI = 39.6 kg m[superscript 2]). Results showed that incorporating aspects of spirituality (i.e., words encouraging connectedness to a higher power, meditation, mind–body activities) into a physical activity program was universally accepted among participants, regardless of religious affiliation. In contrast, including concepts of religion (i.e., bible verses and/or quotes from religious leaders) was controversial and not recommended among women who did not identify with a religious faith. Findings indicate that when developing community-based physical activity interventions that will not be delivered through faith-based or faith-placed settings, researchers should avoid references to specific religious beliefs. Instead, interventions should focus on spirituality and emphasize the mind–body relationship between physical activity and an African American women’s inner-being and her connectedness with a higher power.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-10-23

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Print versus a culturally-relevant Facebook and text message delivered intervention to promote physical activity in African American women: a randomized pilot trial

Description

Background
African American women report insufficient physical activity and are disproportionally burdened by associated disease conditions; indicating the need for innovative approaches to promote physical activity in this underserved population.

Background
African American women report insufficient physical activity and are disproportionally burdened by associated disease conditions; indicating the need for innovative approaches to promote physical activity in this underserved population. Social media platforms (i.e. Facebook) and text messaging represent potential mediums to promote physical activity. This paper reports the results of a randomized pilot trial evaluating a theory-based (Social Cognitive Theory) multi-component intervention using Facebook and text-messages to promote physical activity among African American women.
Methods
Participants (N = 29) were randomly assigned to receive one of two multi-component physical activity interventions over 8 weeks: a culturally-relevant, Social Cognitive Theory-based, intervention delivered by Facebook and text message (FI) (n = 14), or a non-culturally tailored print-based intervention (PI) (n = 15) consisting of promotion brochures mailed to their home. The primary outcome of physical activity was assessed by ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Secondary outcomes included self-reported physical activity, physical activity-related psychosocial variables, and participant satisfaction.
Results
All randomized participants (N = 29) completed the study. Accelerometer measured physical activity showed that FI participants decreased sedentary time (FI = −74 minutes/week vs. PI = +118 minute/week) and increased light intensity (FI = +95 minutes/week vs. PI = +59 minutes/week) and moderate-lifestyle intensity physical activity (FI = + 27 minutes/week vs. PI = −34 minutes/week) in comparison to PI participants (all P’s < .05). No between group differences for accelerometer measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity were observed (P > .05). Results of secondary outcomes showed that in comparison to the PI, FI participants self-reported greater increases in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (FI = +62 minutes/week vs. PI = +6 minutes/week; P = .015) and had greater enhancements in self-regulation for physical activity (P < .001) and social support from family for physical activity (P = .044). Satisfaction with the FI was also high: 100% reported physical activity-related knowledge gains and 100% would recommend the program to a friend.
Conclusions
A culturally-relevant Facebook and text message delivered physical activity program was associated with several positive outcomes, including decreased sedentary behavior, increased light- and moderate-lifestyle intensity physical activity, enhanced psychosocial outcomes, and high participant satisfaction. Future studies with larger samples are warranted to further explore the efficacy of technology-based approaches to promote physical activity among African American women.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-03-27

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Feasibility, acceptability, and characteristics associated with adherence and completion of a culturally relevant internet-enhanced physical activity pilot intervention for overweight and obese young adult African American women enrolled in college

Description

Background
African American women are one of the least active demographic groups in the US, with only 36% meeting the national physical activity recommendations in comparison to 46% of White

Background
African American women are one of the least active demographic groups in the US, with only 36% meeting the national physical activity recommendations in comparison to 46% of White women. Physical activity begins to decline in African American women in adolescence and continues to decline into young adulthood. Yet, few interventions have been developed to promote physical activity in African American women during this critical period of life. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of a culturally-relevant Internet-enhanced physical activity pilot intervention for overweight/obese African American college females and to examine psychosocial and behavioral characteristics associated with intervention adherence and completion.
Methods
A 6-month single group pre-posttest design was used. Participants (n = 27) accessed a culturally-relevant Social Cognitive Theory-based physical activity promotion website while engaging in a minimum of four moderate-intensity physical activity sessions each week. Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention was assessed by participant retention and a consumer satisfaction survey completed by participants.
Results
Fifty-six percent of participants (n = 15) completed the intervention. Study completers were more physically active at baseline (P = 0.05) and had greater social support for exercise from family members (P = 0.04). Sixty percent of study completers (n = 9) reported the website as “enjoyable” or “very enjoyable” to use and 60% (n = 9) reported increased motivation from participation in the physical activity program. Moreover, 87% (n = 13) reported they would recommend the website to a friend.
Conclusions
Results provide some preliminary support for the acceptability and feasibility of an Internet-enhanced physical activity program for overweight/obese African American women, while highlighting important limitations of the approach. Successful promotion of physical activity in college aged African American women as they emerge into adulthood may result in the development of life-long healthy physical activity patterns which may ultimately reduce physical activity-related health disparities in this high risk underserved population. Future studies with larger samples are needed to further explore the use of Internet-based programs to promote physical activity in this population.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-06-02

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E-Cigarette and Subsequent Smoking Use and Relationship to E-Cigarette Quit Attempts Among College Students

Description

The present study investigated the student population at Arizona State University to: (1) assess how electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is associated with subsequent smoking (cigarette, hookah, cigarillo, smokeless tobacco, marijuana)

The present study investigated the student population at Arizona State University to: (1) assess how electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is associated with subsequent smoking (cigarette, hookah, cigarillo, smokeless tobacco, marijuana) use; (2) investigate the relationship of e-cigarette use with non-electronic smoking cessation, and vice versa; and (3) compare how e-cigarette use is associated with cessation of non-electronic smoking. Based on previous related research and tools, the cross-sectional study included an anonymous online screening, followed by a survey that assessed e-cigarette use and non-electronic smoking, e-cigarette withdrawal and cessation, and non-electronic smoking quit attempts. Participants (N=65) were recruited via flyer advertisements, social media advertisements, ASU online advertisements, and email notices. Major findings of this study include: Participants who used non-electronic smoking primarily used cigarettes or marijuana; participants who used both electronic and non-electronic smoking more frequently used e-cigarettes than non-electronic forms; and participants who previously attempted e-cigarette cession believe that they will successfully withdraw from e-cigarette use in the future, by either using marijuana or not using non-electronic smoking in the future. Based on these findings, nurses should assess all youth and young adults for e-cigarette “core constructs”; provide evidence-based interventions; and encourage future, successful e-cigarette cessation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05