Matching Items (3)

Queering Hamlet: The Tragedy of Hamlet and Horatio

Description

Queering Shakespeare: The Tragedy of Hamlet and Horatio is a creative project that reimagines Shakespeare's Hamlet. Inspired by my own experiences as a queer teen, the play explores how gender

Queering Shakespeare: The Tragedy of Hamlet and Horatio is a creative project that reimagines Shakespeare's Hamlet. Inspired by my own experiences as a queer teen, the play explores how gender and sexual identities affect the lives of queer youth. Hamlet is reimagined as a polyamorous, transgender man, who is dating a lesbian Ophelia and nonbinary Horatio. The play is told from the perspective of Horatio, who has lived through the tragedy to tell Hamlet's story. They present the events through a compilation of personal videos, filmed from a variety of perspectives. The interactions between the characters of the play showcase the importance of open communication with friends, partners, and family members, while touching on issues of abusive relationships and mental illness. The project aims to foster discussion on the use of Shakespearean adaptation for modern audiences and create more LGBTQ+ representation in media.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

The Morning After Twelfth Night: An Exploration of Events Following Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

Description

This is a work of fiction, fueled by research, that explores events following the conclusion of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. Also included is a short essay detailing the author's research and motives behind including certain events.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Trauma, typology, and anti-Catholicism in early modern England, 1579-1625

Description

“Trauma, Typology, and Anti-Catholicism in Early Modern England” explores the connection between the biblical exegetical mode of typology and the construction of traumatic historiography in early modern English anti-Catholicism. The

“Trauma, Typology, and Anti-Catholicism in Early Modern England” explores the connection between the biblical exegetical mode of typology and the construction of traumatic historiography in early modern English anti-Catholicism. The Protestant use of typology—for example, linking Elizabeth to Eve--was a textual expression of political and religious trauma surrounding the English Reformation and responded to the threat presented by foreign and domestic Catholicism between 1579 and 1625. During this period of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, English anti-Catholicism began to encompass not only doctrine, but stereotypical representations of Catholics and their desire to overthrow Protestant sovereignty. English Protestant polemicists viewed themselves as taking part in an important hermeneutical process that allowed their readers to understand the role of the past in the present. Viewing English anti-Catholicism through the lens of trauma studies allows us greater insight into the beliefs that underpinned this religio-political rhetoric.

Much of this rhetorical use of typology generated accessible associations of Catholics with both biblical villains and with officials who persecuted and executed Protestants during the reign of Mary I. These associations created a typological network that reinforced the notion of English Protestants as an elect people, while at the same time exploring Protestant religio-political anxiety in the wake of various Catholic plots. Each chapter explores texts published in moments of Catholic “crisis” wherein typology and trauma form a recursive loop by which the parameters of the threat can be understood. The first chapter examines John Stubbs’s Discovery of a Gaping Gulf (1579) and his views of Protestant female monarchy and a sexualized Catholic threat in response to Elizabeth I’s proposed marriage to the French Catholic Duke of Anjou. The second chapter surveys popular and state responses to the first Jesuit mission to England in 1580. The final chapters consider the place of typology and trauma in works by mercantilist Thomas Milles in response to recusant equivocation following the thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and in Thomas Middleton’s A Game at Chess (1624) as a response to the failure of marriage negotiations between the Protestant Prince Charles and the Catholic Spanish Infanta.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015