Matching Items (23)

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Traveling Abroad: A Minority Student's Experience

Description

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority

As the daughter of Mexican parents, I was raised with family-centered values which conflict with the values of independence, freedom and individuality stressed in the United States. Being a minority has become part of my identity, thus influencing how I make decisions about finances and traveling. Minorities are faced with many more concern, like familial concerns and financial obligations which hinder their desire to attempt to travel (Salisbury, Paulsen, & Ernest, 2011). My main concerns were convincing my parents that traveling to Nicaragua and studying abroad in Greece and Italy would be beneficial to my college experience, along with financially being able to go through with each experience. The main purpose of my thesis is to share what it is like to be a minority faced with cultural and financial obstacles that make it difficult to travel and how the experience is shaped due to these obstacles.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Sexual Violence and Exploitation in Syrian Women Seeking Refuge from Civil War: The Role of the International Community in Providing Safety

Description

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and

The civil war in Syria has caused over one million Syrians to flee to bordering countries seeking protection. One of the major causes of this exodus is the reality and fear of sexual violence. Sexual violence against Syrian women is life altering because of the high value the culture places on virtue and modesty; a woman who is known to have been raped faces shame, possible disenfranchisement by her family, and is at high risk for suicide and in some extreme, but few cases, being murdered by a family member in an honor killing. However, once these refugees arrive they are still threatened not only with sexual violence, but also with sexual exploitation. Sexual violence is devastating to women and families. The international community must work to combat it by helping host countries to prevent the violence, assist victims, prosecute perpetrators, and create safe environments for female refugees. Human rights advocates should look within the philosophy of Islam to encourage gender equality ethics already present therein.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane"

Description

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane" will introduce the reader to scenes from my study abroad at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. The reader will experience the whirlwind nature

"Baba Aruki: A Walk Down Baba Lane" will introduce the reader to scenes from my study abroad at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. The reader will experience the whirlwind nature of study abroad, the complexity of Japanese culture, and vicarious nostalgia for a place, time, and group of people now far removed from my daily life. I invite you to join me on this journey into my time in a different world. (Please note: turn on "comments" in the pdf file.)

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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From Millerites to Mayans: Two Hundred Years of American Apocalypticism

Description

Ten percent of the global population believed that the world would end on December 21, 2012. But people have believed that the world was going to end before. What causes

Ten percent of the global population believed that the world would end on December 21, 2012. But people have believed that the world was going to end before. What causes these apocalyptic crazes and what allows them to spread beyond the fringes of society? What role does popular religion play in creating or spreading apocalyptic hysteria? How do these prophets of doom react when the world still exists past its predicted date of expiration? What about the people who believed them? This paper examines historical instances of apocalyptic predictions, how these predictions were formed out of or shaped by popular religion, as well as the reactions \u2014 both internal and external \u2014 of those who either predicted or believed that the end was near. After building this historical context, I turn my focus to the pop culture phenomenon that is the end of the Mayan Calendar. I attempt to understand and explain what aspects of the current social, religious, and psychological climate have contributed to the cultural ubiquity of and fascination with the December 21, 2012 apocalypse, and what the date actually meant to the Classical Maya. Finally, I examine the existential, religious, and cultural factors that make Americans in particular so ready and willing to believe that the end of the earth is imminent.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The Conquest of Citizenship: The Calderón Experience

Description

On December 28th 2012, immigration authorities arrested my father and mother while grocery shopping. As soon as they stepped outside, immigration officers stopped them to be questioned. Jeopardizing my university

On December 28th 2012, immigration authorities arrested my father and mother while grocery shopping. As soon as they stepped outside, immigration officers stopped them to be questioned. Jeopardizing my university graduation, I took on the challenge to fight court and petition my parents to not be deported. As a first generation born American, I have the power and the right to petition for the freedom of my parents. I was fortunate to be born in this country as a citizen and take advantage of all the opportunities given to me. Up until today, my family and I have done nothing but participate as good citizens. What I failed to realize is that one day our family would become deportation victims of the broken immigration system. There are currently between 11 to12 million undocumented people living in the United States with no pathway to citizenship. My father and mother were humiliated in jail, separated from the family for three months and suffered from emotional distress. It is imperative for me to share our family experience so others know the reality about illegal immigration. In this paper I aspire to leave the reader with knowledge and understanding about illegal immigration. The main purpose of my thesis is to retell my family's experience and the struggle we are still currently facing. The fate of my family was decided on March 25th 2013, and my family has been forever changed. We learned the valuable lesson that as Latinos in the community, we need to fight for freedom and speak on those that are undocumented and afraid.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Sustainability and Identity: The Case of Costa Rica

Description

This study examines sustainable development concerns as an essential part of the Costa Rican national identity. Interviews with ecotourism industry workers and an analysis of pertinent news articles shine light

This study examines sustainable development concerns as an essential part of the Costa Rican national identity. Interviews with ecotourism industry workers and an analysis of pertinent news articles shine light on the Costa Rican citizen's perspective of sustainable development, showing that in spite of current initiatives industry workers still have unmet environmental and economic concerns, and that the general public is both passionately interested and personally invested in the topic.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Improving the Mentoring Program for Industrial Design Students at ASU

Description

My thesis is on the subject of mentoring. I researched the benefits and the styles of programs available and then used my research to create a survey to give to

My thesis is on the subject of mentoring. I researched the benefits and the styles of programs available and then used my research to create a survey to give to IDSA national members to see what they believe would make a good mentoring program. From there I tried to improve the current ASU IDSA mentoring program.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: A Disease of the 20th Century

Description

Spongiform Encephalopathies are a rare family of degenerative brain diseases characterized by the accumulation of plaques and formation of tiny holes in the brain tissue making it look "spongy". Spongiform

Spongiform Encephalopathies are a rare family of degenerative brain diseases characterized by the accumulation of plaques and formation of tiny holes in the brain tissue making it look "spongy". Spongiform Encephalopathies have a relatively short history but their origins date back to a time long before they were recognized as a disease. It was not until the 1700s that the first record of their existence was made. In 1732 a shepherd in England noticed that some sheep in his flock had become itchy and were "scraping" themselves on nearby trees and fence posts; he reported it to the agricultural authorities of the time. As the symptoms seen in his sheep progressed they also developed problems walking and began to have seizures. Eventually their neurological symptoms progressed to an unmanageable level and they died. In 1794, over 50 years later, the Board of Agriculture in the UK termed this illness in sheep "the Rubbers". In the following years while coming in and out of mention in many flocks of sheep "the Rubbers" remained a disease of minimal consequence showing negligible ability to spread among sheep and having no precedence for jumping the species barrier and affecting humans. The first mention of "the Rubbers" as Scrapie was in 1853, and it is still the designation of the disease in sheep today.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012-12

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War-Time Defenses: PTSD and Trauma in "The Hunger Games" Series

Description

The Hunger Games is one of the best representations of trauma and PTSD within a fictional work. While none of the characters are specifically diagnosed with PTSD, all of those

The Hunger Games is one of the best representations of trauma and PTSD within a fictional work. While none of the characters are specifically diagnosed with PTSD, all of those who undergo the games put in place by the Capitol experience various forms of trauma and find various methods of coping. We see characters such as Haymitch or the morphling victors turn to drugs and alcohol for their survival. Further, we see characters such as Wiress and Annie who have incoherent speech and who struggle to put their thoughts into words. Finally, there are characters such as Peeta and Katniss who fight to hold onto the slightest bit of hope to try and remain in the present and avoid flashbacks and nightmares that return them to the horrors of the past. However, despite all of these symptoms of PTSD and trauma that are present through all three books of the series, one of the most important aspects of recovery from trauma that is demonstrated is the power of the ability to reconnect, to yourself, to family and friends and to others who have also experienced trauma. This social aspect of reconnecting relationships is the focus I would like to take for my thesis because I believe that it is one of the most powerful and the most healing aspect of trauma and PTSD. It is the most beneficial when those around you understand your experiences with PTSD and trauma and they are the ones who are able to help you the most in remaining in the present and wanting to continue living.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Political, Financial & Cultural Difficulties of Operating a Microcredit Lending Institution in Israel & the Palestinian Territories

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural

The purpose of this study is to identify, analyze, and understand the concept of microcredit lending as a method of combating poverty, as well as the political, financial, and cultural difficulties of operating such an organization. The study investigates microcredit lending organizations (also referred to as microlending organizations or microlending banks) in the State of Israel and the Palestinian Territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip; these organizations are used as a case study to analyze the challenges faced by microlending organizations around the world, as well as an interesting lens to observe the geopolitical and socioeconomic difficulties of small-scale economic engagement in this area of heavy conflict. Finally, interesting patterns, behaviors, policies, and operating methods of microlending banks are scrutinized in order to deeply understand the challenges and philosophies behind microlending.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05