Matching Items (91)

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A Science Communicator's Guide to Social Media Engagement

Description

The scientific research conducted by science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) institutions is groundbreaking. Everyday, scientists create a deeper understanding of the world around us, and then communicate that understanding through journal papers, articles, and conferences. To strengthen these traditional

The scientific research conducted by science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) institutions is groundbreaking. Everyday, scientists create a deeper understanding of the world around us, and then communicate that understanding through journal papers, articles, and conferences. To strengthen these traditional forms of communication, science communicators can use social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook to promote themselves and earn digital audience engagement that will grow the impact and success of their research. This thesis synthesizes research on human communication theories, digital user behavior, and science communication practices in order to create the “Science Communicator’s Guide to Social Media Engagement”. This guide empowers science communicators to utilize social media in a way that can increase their digital audience engagement, expand the reach of their research, and ultimately amplify their professional presence in the scientific community.

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2020-12

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Hysteria, Hegemony, and Horror: An Analysis of "The Yellow Wallpaper"

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The goal of my thesis is to examine gender roles and their implications on mental illness in the short story of "The Yellow Wallpaper." The context of this thesis is historical, medical, and literary. The project includes five parts. The

The goal of my thesis is to examine gender roles and their implications on mental illness in the short story of "The Yellow Wallpaper." The context of this thesis is historical, medical, and literary. The project includes five parts. The introduction is an analysis of the various literary criticisms associated with the short story. The second part is research on Charlotte Perkins Gilman and her journey with mental illness. The third part is research and background information on mental illness in the 19th century. The fourth part is research and analysis on the social, political, and economic context of the 19th century in the United States that affected the view of mental illness in the period, such as gender roles. The final part of the thesis is an analysis of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper." The analysis focuses on gender roles of the story and how these relate to the depiction of mental illness. This analysis takes into account the historical background and research when studying the context behind the story. In conclusion, the research and information in this thesis provides a new criticism for readers to consider when analyzing "The Yellow Wallpaper."

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2018-05

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A Feminist Analysis of Fantasy Football Linguistics

Description

Fantasy football exists as a thought-to-be male dominated space, particularly with respect to the linguistic practices of players. Heteronormativity runs rampant, and fantasy players are not held accountable for the implications of their language. This essay analyzes what the dynamics

Fantasy football exists as a thought-to-be male dominated space, particularly with respect to the linguistic practices of players. Heteronormativity runs rampant, and fantasy players are not held accountable for the implications of their language. This essay analyzes what the dynamics of fantasy football leagues are, how current linguistic practices shape them, and suggests that women’s participating in fantasy football leagues functions as a type of trash talk that encourages men to address their internalized heteronormativity and create a more welcoming and progressive experience for people of all genders.

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2019-05

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An Examination of the Organizational Culture and Profitability of Disney World: The Unique Perspectives of Disney Interns

Description

This research examines the relationship between the famed organizational culture of Disney as a company and the profitability of Walt Disney World itself. There are several factors of the organizational culture within the employees or “cast members” of Walt Disney

This research examines the relationship between the famed organizational culture of Disney as a company and the profitability of Walt Disney World itself. There are several factors of the organizational culture within the employees or “cast members” of Walt Disney World that have become the reason Disney itself is so profitable. Those factors have included the training that every cast member must go through, knowledge of the company and the park alike and the positive treatment and benefits given to the cast members by upper management. The training of the cast members is known to establish high levels of trust and respect among the Disney organization and its guests, which can lead to a positive relationship and a long-term customer. The research in this study is to determine whether the organizational culture and the quality of the employees are what causes a Walt Disney World guest to become a customer and that has kept the profitability so high. The research discovered that Walt Disney World leadership has put too much of a focus on making profits. This pressure to make sales has caused organizational culture to become negative and motivation for cast members to sell to drop, causing more pressure from leadership to make sales.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The Relationship between Internalization of the Model Minority Myth and Critical Consciousness among Asian American College Students

Description

Objective: This study examined how the belief (internalization) in the model minority myth of achievement orientation and of unrestricted mobility relates to one’s social awareness of racial inequity and inequality in society (critical consciousness) amongst Asian American college students. Methods:

Objective: This study examined how the belief (internalization) in the model minority myth of achievement orientation and of unrestricted mobility relates to one’s social awareness of racial inequity and inequality in society (critical consciousness) amongst Asian American college students. Methods: Participants (N = 275, 67.7% female, M_age = 22.35) were recruited from Asian American ethnic studies classes, clubs and organizations and completed an online cross-sectional survey. Results: Results indicated that internalization of achievement orientation significantly correlated with levels of racial critical consciousness while unrestricted mobility did not. Conclusion: These findings extend research exploring the correlates of critical consciousness on internalization of racial stereotypes for Asian Americans.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Raising Awareness of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Among Native American Children

Description

The purpose of this study to bring awareness to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among Native American children. The study is a layered autoethnographic study which drew on research completed on ASD and modeled autoethnographic work completed by Henson (2011) and

The purpose of this study to bring awareness to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among Native American children. The study is a layered autoethnographic study which drew on research completed on ASD and modeled autoethnographic work completed by Henson (2011) and Sughrua (2013). The premise of the study was to examine my experiences as a Native American mother who has a child diagnosed with ASD. The research completed is seen through my ethnic and cultural lens and focused on my son, ASD, minority children, and how race may have effected date of diagnosis.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Cooking, Consumption, and Identity Crisis: Communicating Femininity as a 1950s' Housewife

Description

While there are many characteristics that make up a woman, femininity is one that is difficult to define because it is a communication and expression practice defined by culture. This research explores historical accounts of femininity in the 1950s as

While there are many characteristics that make up a woman, femininity is one that is difficult to define because it is a communication and expression practice defined by culture. This research explores historical accounts of femininity in the 1950s as seen through the exemplar of the white, middle-class "happy homemaker" or "happy housewife." The 1950s is important to study in light of changing gender and social dynamics due to the transition from World War II to a period of prosperity. By using primary sources from the 1950s and secondary historical analyses, this research takes the form of a sociological accounting of 1950s' femininity and the lessons that can be applied today. Four cultural forces led to homemakers having an unspoken identity crisis because they defined themselves in terms of relationship with others and struggled to uphold a certain level of femininity. The forces are: the feminine mystique, patriotism, cultural normalcy, and unnecessary choices. These forces caused women to have unhealthy home relationships in their marriages and motherhood while persistently doing acts to prove their self-worth, such as housework and consuming. It is important to not look back at the 1950s as an idyllic time without also considering the social and cultural practices that fostered a feminine conformity in women. Today, changes can be made to allow women to express femininity in modern ways by adapting to reality instead of to outdated values. For example, changes in maternity leave policies allow women to be mothers and still be in the workforce. Additionally, women should find fulfillment in themselves by establishing a strong personal identity and confidence in their womanhood before identifying through other people or through society.

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Date Created
2018-12

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Increasing Academic and Social Accessibility at Arizona State University for Students with Autism  Spectrum Disorder: A Program Evaluation

Description

This qualitative study considers past literature on postsecondary education for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. In addition to this, it explains two existing specialized programs at universities for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and discusses strengths and

This qualitative study considers past literature on postsecondary education for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. In addition to this, it explains two existing specialized programs at universities for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and discusses strengths and areas of consideration. This study explains best practices and analyzes how to develop a specialized program that embodies best practice at Arizona State University.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The Ugly Side of Beauty; A Second Look at Wendy Chapkis’ Beauty Secrets: Women and the Politics of Appearance

Description

In 1986, Wendy Chapkis published Beauty Secrets: Women and the Politics of Appearance, exploring beauty as it is interpreted through physical appearance, gender, and sexuality. Over thirty years later, many of the trends and problems Chapkis identified still exist or

In 1986, Wendy Chapkis published Beauty Secrets: Women and the Politics of Appearance, exploring beauty as it is interpreted through physical appearance, gender, and sexuality. Over thirty years later, many of the trends and problems Chapkis identified still exist or have gotten worse; we still live in a society that praises ideal physical beauty, and creates and reinforces unrealistic beauty standards. This research strives to determine why these problems still exist, and how to solve them. Through a combination of creative writing and analytic research, this project will discuss topics that have helped to create problems like cultural influences, gender norms, and the media, as well as discuss the consequences like mental health and eating disorders, and the unattainable ideal beauty standard. The purpose of this study is to bring new attention to the flaws of a society that teaches people they are defined by their appearance, in order to teach people what actions we need to take to make real progress. Research was conducted using an online survey to allow for anonymous, honest, responses, which were then analyzed to inspire sections of creative writing, as well as fuel the analytical research portions of the paper. In this way, the text mirrors Chapkis’ original style to connect and engage with readers. Research shows that many respondents know there are problems with society’s standards, but feel powerless to change anything. This study provides a platform to restart the conversation, and call people to action, to inspire people not to simply redefine beauty, but teach them that they should not define others or themselves by merely their physical appearance.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Writing with Integrity: Maintaining Culture and Voice in my Father's Stories

Description

I wrote creative non-fiction to enrich and expand the existing narratives of Mexican immigrant experiences by preserving oral histories and thus, influence a broader cultural understanding. As a first-generation Mexican-American writer, I believe there is a pressing need to explore

I wrote creative non-fiction to enrich and expand the existing narratives of Mexican immigrant experiences by preserving oral histories and thus, influence a broader cultural understanding. As a first-generation Mexican-American writer, I believe there is a pressing need to explore the stories of my people, particularly those of my father. I also acknowledge the master narratives that work to influence and consequently oppress my own voice as a writer. The master narrative values white experiences and voices in narrative writing while devaluing work from non-white authors. Thus, it became critical for me to reclaim my true voice as a writer and consequently, disrupt this harmful master narrative. Through this project, I reclaimed my voice as a writer, the one that pays homage to my cultural roots by writing my father's stories authentically. I integrated my heritage language Spanish and English in the writing of these stories. As the daughter of immigrants, this is an important way of representing my identity through my writing. Additionally, the importance of this work is greatly exemplified by the unity that springs forth among Mexican immigrants and children of those immigrants when experiences like these are shared and released into the world. At present, the Mexican immigrant community faces social and political discrimination in the form of misrepresentation, anti-immigrant rhetoric, and racism. Therefore, there is a palpable need for more accurate representation to combat these issues. Written storytelling provides a valuable glimpse into my father's experience as a Mexican immigrant and is a valuable tool to challenge harmful master narratives.

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Date Created
2018-05