Matching Items (4)

137439-Thumbnail Image.png

33 Buckets: Distributing Clean Water in Bangladesh

Description

Bangladesh is facing one of the largest mass poisonings in human history with over 77 million people affected by contaminated water each and every day. Over the last few years,

Bangladesh is facing one of the largest mass poisonings in human history with over 77 million people affected by contaminated water each and every day. Over the last few years, the 33 Buckets team has come together to help fulfill this clean water need through filtration, education, and an innovative distribution system to inspire and empower people in Bangladesh and across the world. To start this process, we are working with the Rahima Hoque Girls' school in the rural area of Raipura, Bangladesh to give girls access to clean water where they spend the most time. Through our assessment trip in May 2012, we were able to acquire technical data, community input, and partnerships necessary to move our project forward. Additionally, we realized that in many cases, including the Rahima Hoque school, water problems are not caused by a lack of technology, but rather a lack of utilization and maintenance long-term. To remedy this, 33 Buckets has identified a local filter to have installed at the school, and has designed a small-scale business focused on selling clean water in bulk to the surrounding community. Our price point and association with the Rahima Hoque Girls' school makes our solution sustainable. Plus, with the success of our first site, we see the potential to scale. We already have five nearby schools interested in working to implement similar water projects, and with over 100,000 schools in Bangladesh, many of which lack access to the right water systems, we have a huge opportunity to impact millions of lives. This thesis project describes our journey through this process. First, an introduction to our work prior to the assessment trip and through the ASU EPICS program is given. Second, we include quantitative and qualitative details regarding our May 2012 assessment trip to the Rahima Hoque school and Dhaka. Third, we recount some of the experiences we were able to participate in following the trip to Bangladesh, including the Dell Social Innovation Challenge. Fourth, we examine the technical filtration methods, business model development, and educational materials that will be used to implement our solution this summer. Finally, we include an Appendix with a variety of social venture competitions and applications that we have submitted over the past two years, in addition to other supplementary materials. These are excellent examples of our diligence and provide unique insight into the growth of our project.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

Engineering – The Social Experiment: An Analysis of Engineering Curriculum and Industry Expectations

Description

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, is the voice of reason for the development of engineering programs. Aspiring engineers desire institutions that follow ABET Standards to ensure that their education meets the expectations of industry partners and researchers. However, these standards have not been drastically altered in years to reflect the changing needs of industry. With the advancement of technology in the last two decades, old school engineering and its application is becoming less common.

Science policy and curriculum go hand in. The future engineers are taught hand calculations, lab testing for field work parallels, and methodologies based on the written policies set forth decades ago. Technology today is rapidly changing, and engineering education is struggling to make changes to keep up with these technology advancements. In today’s world, technology drives invention and innovation, whereas some argue it is thought and curiosity. Engineering programs are taking a toll regardless of the point of view. Education is not made to keep up with current societal needs.

This paper a provides an overview of the history of engineering, curriculum standards for engineering programs, an analysis of engineering programs at top universities and large universities alongside student experiences available to engineers. The ideas offered are no means the exact solution; rather policymakers and STEM education stakeholder may find the ideas shared helpful and use them as a catalyst for change.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

132160-Thumbnail Image.png

A Human-Centered Approach to the Global Water Crisis

Description

The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that water related diseases cause more than 3.4 million deaths every year across the globe (Berman 2009). Children are the most susceptible to

The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that water related diseases cause more than 3.4 million deaths every year across the globe (Berman 2009). Children are the most susceptible to becoming ill over contaminated water. Cases of childhood diarrheal disease, a common result of consuming contaminated water, are estimated at 1.7 billion every year, killing over 500,000 children under the age of five (WHO: Diarrhoeal Disease, 2017). Preventing consumption of contaminated drinking water is a complex issue. The process of identifying and purifying contaminants from water sources is an in-depth and costly endeavor. Often, communities do not receive ample support from municipal entities and are left to deal with the issue independently. This causes a lack of adequate resources and training for communities around the world dealing with contaminated water supplies. The ultimate result is the consumption of contaminated drinking water that creates foundational barriers to growth in areas like education, health, and overall quality of life. The primary purpose of this thesis report is to outline the proposed approach and technological elements for improving the usability and effectiveness of community-wide chlorination systems to remove bacterial pathogens to prevent consumption of contaminated drinking water.
While it may be complex, the prevention and treatment of contaminated water is possible. Founded in 2010, 33 Buckets is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based out of Tempe, Arizona who partners with vulnerable communities and local partners to provide sustainable access to clean drinking water and WASH (Water and Sanitation for Health) training. Prior to 2018, 33 Buckets had completed drinking water projects in Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, and Peru. In the summer of 2018, the 33 Buckets team returned to the Cusco region of Peru in an effort to assess more communities in need of clean drinking water infrastructure. In Cusco, 33 Buckets works closely with the Peruvian university, Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola (USIL). The primary purpose of this partnership is to identify communities in the Cusco region with contaminated water sources and a strong interest in improvement of current systems. Throughout this assessment trip, two communities were initially identified as potential partners, Occopata and Mayrasco. The results of bacteria tests showed a presence of Escherichia coli, commonly known as E. coli. When consumed, especially repeatedly, select strains of E. coli will cause severe diarrheal illness. Interviews with community members confirmed that common symptoms of water related disease are prevalent, especially in children. In Occopata and Mayrasco, there is an absence of support for water services from the municipality. Consequently, there is a volunteer-based water advisory board known as Junto Administración de Agua Sanitemeniento (JAAS). JAAS, in most nearby communities, currently utilizes a drip chlorination system in an attempt to disinfect bacterial pathogens from their water source. However, chlorine disinfection requires a precise dosing in order to be effective. In excessive amounts, chlorine will taste and smell of chemicals, likely producing negative feedback from community members. As a result, chlorine levels often are below the necessary level for disinfection. Chlorine tests performed by the 33 Buckets team confirmed that chlorine levels were insufficient to disinfect E. coli.
During the assessment trip, the 33 Buckets team provided a temporary solution to make chlorine disinfection more effective. Following the 2018 assessment trip, 33 Buckets formed a team of student engineers with the primary goal of furthering the technological development of a chlorine disinfection system to be implemented in communities with bacterial infected water sources. This student team was formed through the EPICS (Engineering Projects in Community Service) program at Arizona State University. The purpose of the program is providing a platform for undergraduate engineers to design solutions that create positive impact the greater community. From August of 2018 through April of 2019, the team developed the design for a continuous chlorine disinfection system that automatically tests for residual chlorine levels at multiple points throughout a community. The system is powered entirely from a low-cost solar panel, requiring a minimal amount of sunlight for full functionality. Moving forward, the goal of project development is to create an autonomous feedback loop that will adjust the amount of chlorine exposure to incoming water flows based on the results of the automatic residual chlorine test. The team also hopes to implement automatic data collection for remote monitoring of water quality in addition to onsite test results. The vision of the proposed solution is a network of chlorine disinfection systems around the Cusco region that ultimately will provide access to clean drinking water, indefinitely. This model of user-friendly purification, automatic testing, and data collection can be adjusted and applied to any region around the world experiencing health issues from consumption of contaminated water. A low-cost, scalable, and reliable water disinfection system has the potential to make significant increases in the quality of life for millions of people.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

133400-Thumbnail Image.png

Marvel at The Ordinary: A Community-Centered Gratitude Movement

Description

This project was generated out of a desire to understand and explore a novel twist on a well-traversed route to happiness. I set out looking for a new perspective on

This project was generated out of a desire to understand and explore a novel twist on a well-traversed route to happiness. I set out looking for a new perspective on fulfillment and found sustainable, everyday joy through gratitude. In doing so, I created a space where a group of people could practice and share gratitude as a community. Gratitude is familiar to most as a feeling, but putting intention behind gratitude turns it into an action, and even a virtue. In fact, Roman philosopher Cicero says, "Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others." I created a Facebook community called Marvel at The Ordinary (MATO) applying principles rooted in the Theory of Change to express this greatest virtue. I found both success and earnest support from others in this novel approach to current gratitude practices. Defined by Dr. Robert Emmons, an expert in the science of gratitude, practicing gratitude is a two-step process: "(1.) affirming goodness in one's life, and (2.) recognizing that the sources of this goodness lie at least partially outside of the self." There is substantial research touting the worth of gratitude journaling, in fact, few things have been more repeatedly and empirically vetted than the connection between gratitude and overall happiness and well-being. Yet there is one facet ubiquitously overlooked in current gratitude research: what happens when gratitude journaling is shared with others? With anecdotal evidence, short-form interview analysis, thematic analysis of journaling lexicon, and a case study on the growth and engagement of Marvel at The Ordinary as a social movement, there is reason to believe that a social media-based community centered around gratitude may support and even enhance the practice of gratitude, which is typically practiced in isolation. It was also found that communities of this sort are highly sought after, based on the engagement within and growth of the Facebook group from 50 to 600+ members in a period of 2 months. MATO set out with the aspirations of creating a community which encourages others to gratitude journal, raising awareness about gratitude journaling, and building a community which fosters empathy, optimism, and awareness in an everyday sense. In each of these goals, overwhelming success was found.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05