Matching Items (38)

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Worksite Wellness and Its Impact on Mental Health

Description

The overall goal of this paper is to promote wellness, exercise and positive mental health. To encourage this goal, insight on the benefits of worksite wellness programs will be provided.

The overall goal of this paper is to promote wellness, exercise and positive mental health. To encourage this goal, insight on the benefits of worksite wellness programs will be provided. Current worksite wellness programs focus minimally on the mental health benefits of exercise. Instead they focus on physiological results that come with worksite wellness programs. Exercise can provide both physiological and psychological health benefits (Ramirez & Wipfli, 2012). There should be more emphasis on mental health benefits of worksite wellness programs to provide positive mental health benefits in the workplace.
There are many different types of worksite wellness programs such as group fitness, on-site facilities and health allowances. It is important to vary wellness activities due to individuals having different fitness and health motivation. This implementation can become costly and require resources and support that many companies do not want to provide without successful results. Focusing on the psychological health benefits to such programs will allow companies to recognize the increase in productivity and positive work environment that result in worksite wellness programs. This will allow not only employees to benefit from the implementation of such programs but also the succession of the company.
This paper will explore ways to seek future enhancements within worksite wellness programs. Individuals will be given ways to positively contribute to work environments while maintaining healthy lifestyles. Companies will also better understand the importance that top recruits in the industry see within these types of programs. Through worksite wellness programs, employees will be provided with the tools necessary to improve their physical and mental health, while companies will have a more positive work environment as a result.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Paddle With A Purpose: A Synthesis on My Perspective on Cultivating an Intentional Life of Happiness

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Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state

Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state of being happy. In my book, I dive into the most important topics that contribute to daily and global happiness. Each of the following topics are explored within the evidence-based literature and juxtaposed with my own life experience and perspective. First, I will explore society’s impact on happiness. Society shapes our perspective more than we realize, so it is important to debunk what rings true to us individually and what does not. Next, I’ll share with you my favorite thing in life—gratitude. Gratitude is the easiest way to transition a negative affect into a positive state of being. In chapter three I will discuss how language and perspective shape our experiences. Word choice and self-talk are extremely impactful in your relationship with yourself and your relationship with others. Chapter four is about complaining and how it serves us and inhibits us. There are many functions to complaining, like self-awareness and enhanced interpersonal relationships as well as consequences like being a draining friend to be around. Then I’ll share about the phenomenon of emotional contagion and compassion and finish it up with the final chapter about being present and practicing happiness in our daily lives. It is most important to live a life full of intentional daily actions. The tone of my book is conversational and meant to serve as an inspirational tool to aide in achieving a happier life.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Keys to the Mind of an Elite Pole Vaulter: An Investigation of Psychological Skills and Mental Toughness

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Athletes at any level of competition face high-stress environments in which they are still expected to perform at a high level. Because of this, athletes require mental toughness in order

Athletes at any level of competition face high-stress environments in which they are still expected to perform at a high level. Because of this, athletes require mental toughness in order to skillfully perform and hopefully outperform their opponents. Mental toughness in sport is a term used to describe a variety of psychological skills that an athlete utilizes that allows them to perform better and more consistently than their competitors. This study was designed to determine whether mental toughness distinguished pole vaulters at three different levels of competition. It was hypothesized that post-collegiate athletes would have higher mental toughness scores than collegiate athletes who would subsequently score higher than high school athletes. Two questionnaires were given to high school, collegiate, and post-collegiate pole vaulters (n = 65) to determine total mental toughness scores as well as scores for eight different subcategories of mental toughness including motivation, self-belief, intensity, focus, control, coping, thriving on pressure, and assertiveness. ANOVA and multiple comparisons demonstrated that mental toughness differentiated post-collegiate pole vaulters from high school pole vaulters, but not between collegiate and post-collegiate. Additionally, collegiate and post-collegiate vaulters scored significantly higher than high school vaulters in the subcategories of motivation and control. Data also showed that male competitors demonstrated significantly higher mental toughness scores than female athletes on both questionnaires. Based on the research, knowing that mental toughness scores differentiate high school pole vaulters from elite pole vaulters (particularly in the areas of control and motivation) could set the foundation for training programs and targeted psychological interventions for younger athletes.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Effects of Physical Activity Prescriptions on Psychological Outcomes

Description

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how physical activity affects psychological outcomes and it’s efficacy for treating mental health disorders. The current treatment options for depression and anxiety are not suitable for everyone and therefore there is a need for a more accessible and cost-effective form of treatment, like exercise. Furthermore, exercise as a treatment is also linked with many more health benefits. Indeed a wealth of studies have explored the relationships between exercise and depression as well as exercise and anxiety, showing exercise to be a positive predictor of mental health. The following paper will serve to: define depressive and anxiety disorders, explore the research on the effects of physical activity prescriptions on the outcomes of such disorders, create evidence-based applied recommendations for different disorders, and explore the mechanisms by which exercise mitigates symptoms to ultimately accredit the prescription of exercise as a form of treatment for mental health disorders.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Translation of Physical Activity from Adolescence to Adulthood in Women: Investigating the Relationship Between Adolescent Engagement in Coordination and Performance Activities and Adult Physical Activity Levels

Description

Physical activity has been shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (Warburton, Nicol & Bredin, 2006). Women tend

Physical activity has been shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (Warburton, Nicol & Bredin, 2006). Women tend to be much less active than males and are henceforth at a greater risk for developing these conditions (Biddle & Mutrie, 2008). This study addresses what impact type of physical activity in adolescence has on adult physical activity levels in the female population. Specifically, the study focuses on coordination and performance activities in adolescence, and how adult physical activity levels compare to both sedentary adolescents and adolescent endurance and ball sport athletes. Ninety-six female participants that were ages 20-29 (N=53) and 30-39 (N=43) were asked to fill out a survey about their adolescent activity levels and their current activity levels. Those participants who identified as participating in coordination and performance activity (N=43) were compared to those who were sedentary (N=14) and then further compared to those who engaged in other types of adolescent activity (N=39). It was determined that coordination and performance activities during adolescence did have a significant effect on frequency of female adult physical activity when compared to their sedentary counterparts (p=0.015). Adolescent endurance and ball sport athletes did tend to have a greater frequency of current activity in adulthood than those involved in coordination and performance activities, which was attributed to a greater frequency of practice per week in those sports. In conclusion, introducing a frequent amount of physical activity the female adolescent enjoys increases their likelihood of frequently engaging in physical activity as an adult.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Assisted Cycling Therapy Improves Self-Efficacy in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-nine participants were randomly divided into a voluntary cycling group (VC)

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-nine participants were randomly divided into a voluntary cycling group (VC) (i.e., self-selected cadence), an assisted cycling group (ACT) (i.e., at least 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), or a no exercise group (NC). In each cycling intervention the participant completed 30 minute cycling sessions, three times per week for a total of eight weeks. Two subsets of the Physical Activity and Self Efficacy Survey were administered prior to cycling (i.e., pretest) and after the eight week intervention (i.e., post-test). The results were consistent with the hypothesis that self-efficacy would improve after ACT, however there was not improvement after the VC condition as hypothesized. It was also hypothesized that exercise perception would improve following the ACT intervention; execise perception showed a trend of improvement after ACT, but the data did not reach significance. Limitations include the wide variability of the DS population. This limitation is responsible for the variation in mental age seen in the intervention groups and could be responsible for the non-significance of the exercise perception data. To generalize our results for parents, therapists, teachers, etc., our recommendation is for persons with DS to participate in physical activity that is easy for them at first \u2014 a simplified sport or active game, assisted cycling, brisk walking \u2014 so that they have a positive experience with exercise. Showing individuals with DS that they can be proficient exercisers will likely improve their self-efficacy and motivate them to engage in more PA over time. In conclusion, eight weeks of moderate ACT exercise demonstrated a significant trend for improved self-efficacy in adolescents with DS.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Effects of a 12-week Lifestyle Intervention on Self-efficacy, Social Support, and Physical Activity in Obese Latino Adolescents

Description

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth and can be seen with an increase incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. This increase in obesity can be attributed

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth and can be seen with an increase incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. This increase in obesity can be attributed to physical inactivity. Increases in social support and self-efficacy are independently related to increases in physical activity. A lifestyle intervention can lead to increases in social support, self-efficacy and physical activity. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine whether a 12-week lifestyle intervention could increase social support, self-efficacy and physical activity in obese Latino adolescents that participated in the intervention. It was hypothesized that adolescents that participated in the intervention would increase self-efficacy, social support from family and friends, and physical activity compared to their control counterparts. Study Design/Participants: In a randomized control trial, there were 125 Latino (n= 60 experimental group; n= 65 control group; mean age = 15.17 +- 1.65 Males n = 60; n = 65 females) participants included in this study. Participants were also required to have a BMI percentile >= 95th percentile for age and gender or BMI >= 30 kg/m2. Methods: The intervention, which was developed using the Social Cognitive Theory had components focusing on social support and self-efficacy and also consisted of nutrition education classes and physical activity sessions for 12 weeks. The psychosocial constructs of self-efficacy and social support were measured using the Adolescent Self-Efficacy for Diet and Activity Behaviors and Adolescent Social Support for Diet and Exercise Survey, respectively. Physical activity was assessed by the 3-day Physical Activity Recall. Results: We found significant increases in social support in family (p = 0.042) and vigorous physical activity (p = 0.001). There was also a significant difference between control and treatment group for moderate to vigorous physical activity after the intervention (p = 0.027). There were no changes in social support from friends or self-efficacy. Conclusion: We concluded that a 12-week lifestyle intervention did lead to changes in social support and physical activity behaviors. These changes could have been influenced by the intervention as they were measured these constructs pre/post intervention.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Implementing the Functional Movement Screen Into Fitness Facilities

Description

Poor functional movement capabilities can often be indicative of an increased risk for non-contact musculoskeletal injury. The Functional Movement Screen is an efficient screen that categorizes people into "at risk

Poor functional movement capabilities can often be indicative of an increased risk for non-contact musculoskeletal injury. The Functional Movement Screen is an efficient screen that categorizes people into "at risk for injury" or "not at risk for injury" through the use of seven comprehensive movement tests. Past research has shown that the screen is a valid and reliable tool in identifying an increased risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen is ideal for fitness settings because those who exercise more often are putting themselves at a higher risk of developing harmful movement patterns or imbalances. Therefore, highly active populations would benefit the most from regular Functional Movement Screens. Functional Movement Screen scores could be utilized by fitness professionals to produce more effective and more individualized training programs that include exercises to maintain or correct functional movement capabilities. The scores on each individual movement test could be analyzed, and any low scores or asymmetries should be noted. Corrective exercises should target the low and asymmetrical scores. The Functional Movement Screen would benefit people who are seeking personal training, because their score on the screen could allow the fitness professional to design a program that targets their individual movement needs. Training programs could implement corrective exercise into the training plan to correct or maintain functional movement while also increasing strength or endurance. Motivational theory-based strategies could provide a method for fitness professionals to foster adherence to the corrective exercises. By increasing feelings of intrinsic motivation using the constructs of the Self-Determination Theory, fitness professionals could increase clients' adherence to corrective exercise and maintain or improve upon their functional movement capabilities.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Predictive Power of Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model on Physical Therapy Patients' Adherence to Home Exercise Program

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home exercise program. The constructs of Self-Determination Theory are autonomy, competence, and social relatedness. The constructs of Health Belief Model are perceived benefits, perceived barriers, perceived severity, and perceived susceptibility. Participants were receiving therapy at two outpatient clinics located in the Phoenix metropolitan area (n=40). Autonomy was assessed with a modified Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire. Competence was assessed with a modified Perceived Competence Scale. Social relatedness was assessed with a modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Perceived benefits and barriers were measured with a modified Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale. Perceived severity and susceptibility were measured with a modified Health Beliefs Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with one Likert-type question that was created by the researchers. The data was scored and analyzed with the scoring guidelines provided by the questionnaires and the statistics software, IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The results showed that competence was the only construct that was significantly correlated with home exercise program adherence. The results from this study should be used for further research that focuses on creating a competence-supportive environment in physical therapy settings.

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Date Created
  • 2018-12

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An Observational Study of the Motivation of Long Distance Cyclists During Faith Based Charity Ride

Description

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women:

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists' participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups based on self-reported experience levels, and it was shown that across all types of experience levels, both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators were expressed but with greater emphasis on intrinsic factors. The most commonly indicated intrinsic motivation subcategories were life meaning, personal goal achievement, and affiliation, with affiliation being recognized by every individual. The most commonly indicated extrinsic subcategories were competition, recognition, health orientation, and weight concern. Though each rider's story was signature to the individual, the very specific religious background and philanthropic mission of the Fuller Center Bike Adventure weighed heavily into each individual's motivation alongside the classified intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therefore, this research offered valuable data about motivation of recreational cyclists but future studies should focus on a less specific population.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05