Matching Items (5)

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Wet NanoBonding of Semiconducting Surfaces Optimized via Surface Energy Modification using Three Liquid Contact Angle Analysis as a Metrology

Description

Semiconductor wafers are analyzed and their total surface energy γT is measured in three components according to the van Oss theory: (1) γLW, surface energy due to Lifshitz-van der Waals

Semiconductor wafers are analyzed and their total surface energy γT is measured in three components according to the van Oss theory: (1) γLW, surface energy due to Lifshitz-van der Waals forces or dipole interactions, (2) γ+, surface energy due to interactions with electron donors, and (3) γ–, surface energy due to interactions with electron acceptors. Surface energy is measured via Three Liquid Contact Angle Analysis (3LCAA), a method of contact angle measurement using the sessile drop technique and three liquids: water, glycerin, and α-bromonaphthalene. This research optimizes the experimental methods of 3LCAA, proving that the technique produces reproducible measurements for surface energy on a variety of surfaces. Wafer surfaces are prepared via thermal oxidation, rapid thermal oxidation, ion beam oxidation, rapid thermal annealing, hydrofluoric acid etching, the RCA clean, the Herbots-Atluri (H-A) process, and the dry and wet anneals used for Dry and Wet NanoBonding™, respectively.
NanoBonding™ is a process for growing molecular bonds between semiconducting surfaces to create a hermetic seal. NanoBonding™ prevents fluid percolation, protecting integrated electronic sensors from corrosive mobile ion species such as sodium. This can extend the lifetime of marine sensors and glucose sensors from less than one week to over two years, dramatically reducing costs and improving quality of life for diabetic patients. Surface energy measurement is critical to understanding and optimizing NanoBonding™. Surface energies are modified through variations on the H-A process, and measured via 3LCAA. The majority of this research focuses on silicon oxide surfaces.
This is the first quantitative measurement of gallium arsenide surface energy in three components. GaAs is a III-V semiconductor with potential commercial use in transistors, but its oxide layer slowly evaporates over time. In subsequent research, 3LCAA may prove key to developing a stable GaAs oxide layer.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Wet NanoBonding™: Catalyzing Molecular Cross-Bridges and Interphases Between Nanoscopically Smoothed Si-Based Surfaces and Tailoring Surface Energy Components

Description

Dry and steam NanoBonding™ are conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a two-dimensional SiOxHy or hydrated SiOxHy interphase connecting surfaces at the nanoscale

Dry and steam NanoBonding™ are conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a two-dimensional SiOxHy or hydrated SiOxHy interphase connecting surfaces at the nanoscale across macroscopic domains. The motivation is to create strong, long lasting, hermetically bonded sensors with their electronics for the development of an artificial pancreas and to bond solar cells to glass panels for robust photovoltaic technology. The first step in NanoBonding™ is to synthesize smooth surfaces with 20 nm wide atomic terraces via a precursor phase, ß-cSiO2 on Si(100) and oxygen-deficient SiOx on the silica using the Herbots-Atluri process and Entrepix’s spin etching. Smooth precursor phases act as geometric and chemical template to nucleate and grow macroscopic contacting domains where cross bridging occurs via arrays of molecular strands in the hydrated SiOxHy interphase. Steam pressurization is found to catalyze NanoBonding™ consistently, eliminating the need for direct mechanical compression that limits the size and shape of wafers to be bonded in turn, reducing the cost of processing. Total surface energy measurements via 3 Liquids Contact Angle Analysis (3L CAA) enables accurate quantitative analysis of the total surface energy and each of its components. 3L CAA at each step in the process shows that surface energy drops to 42.4 ± 0.6 mJ/m2 from 57.5 ± 1.4 mJ/m2 after the Herbots-Atluri clean of an “As Received” wafer. 3L CAA after steam pressurization Nanobonding™ shows almost complete elimination from 13.8 mJ/m2 ± 1.0 to 0.002 ±- 0.0002 mJ/m2 in the contribution of acceptors to the total free surface energy, and an increase from 0.2 ± .03 to 23.8± 1.6 mJ/m2 in the contribution of donors. This is consistent with an increase in hydroxylation of the ß-cSiO2 surface as a consistent precursor phase for cross-bridging. This research optimizes the use of glycerin, water, and α-bromo-naphtalene in the use of 3L CAA to effectively quantify the components of total free surface energy which helps to better understand the most consistent method for NanoBonding™.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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In Vivo Clinical Animal Trials for an Anti-Fog Coating on Surgical Lenses

Description

One major issue that surgeons face during closed body cavity surgery is fogging of the lens surfaces. The cloudy and opaque lens surface caused by water vapor present in closed

One major issue that surgeons face during closed body cavity surgery is fogging of the lens surfaces. The cloudy and opaque lens surface caused by water vapor present in closed body cavities forces the surgeon to repeatedly remove the endoscope, wipe it, and reinsert it back into the patient. This presents several risks such as increased surgery time, greater scarring, and an increased chance of infection. In order to address this issue, the development of the Thin Fluid Film Device (TFFD™) VitreOx™ aims to render the lens surface hydrophilic, whereas it is typically hydrophobic. By creating a hydrophilic polymeric nanomesh, the 3-D water droplets can be trapped to lie flatter, thus resulting in a flatter 2-D sheeting effect. The light can no longer be refracted at different angles off of the 3-dimensional water beads, thus eliminating the opacity of the lens surface.
Two animal trials were performed involving a rat and two pigs in order to prove the efficacy of VitreOx™ in addition to being compared with competitor, Covidien Clearify. A laparoscopy was performed on each animal, and the length of time that the endoscope took to fog was measured post product application. The results of the optimized animal clinical trials involving two Yucatan pigs showed that the scope treated with Covidien’s Clearify began fogging within 8 minutes and continued to do so for the remained of the surgery, as opposed to the scope with VitreOx™ which remained fog free for the full 90-minute procedure. The results proved the efficacy of our product.
The second part of the thesis aimed to optimize HemoClear™, the blood evacuating TFFD™. This was done by testing a higher concentration of 6 mg/mL fibrinogen as compared to previous work. After conducting an experiment designed to mimic closed-body cavity surgery it was determined that the HemoClear™ eliminated fog 67% of the time and evacuated blood with a success of 83%. Future work aims to continue testing at this concentration with variances in mixing and application technique.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Nano-bonding of silicon oxides-based surfaces at low temperature: bonding interphase modeling via molecular dynamics and characterization of bonding surfaces topography, hydro-affinity and free energy

Description

In this work, a new method, "Nanobonding" [1,2] is conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a 2 D silicon oxide SiOxHx interphase connecting the

In this work, a new method, "Nanobonding" [1,2] is conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a 2 D silicon oxide SiOxHx interphase connecting the surfaces at the nanoscale across macroscopic domains. Nanobonding cross-bridges two smooth surfaces put into mechanical contact in an O2/H2O mixed ambient below T <200 °C via arrays of SiOxHx molecules connecting into a continuous macroscopic bonding interphase. Nano-scale surface planarization via wet chemical processing and new spin technology are compared via Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TMAFM) , before and after nano-bonding. Nanobonding uses precursor phases, 2D nano-films of beta-cristobalite (beta-c) SiO2, nucleated on Si(100) via the Herbots-Atluri (H-A) method [1]. beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) is ordered and flat with atomic terraces over 20 nm wide, well above 2 nm found in native oxides. When contacted with SiO2 this ultra-smooth nanophase can nucleate and grow domains with cross-bridging molecular strands of hydroxylated SiOx, instead of point contacts. The high density of molecular bonds across extended terraces forms a strong bond between Si-based substrates, nano- bonding [2] the Si and silica. A new model of beta-cristobalite SiO2 with its <110> axis aligned along Si[100] direction is simulated via ab-initio methods in a nano-bonded stack with beta-c SiO2 in contact with amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2), modelling cross-bridging molecular bonds between beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 as during nanobonding. Computed total energies are compared with those found for Si(100) and a-SiO2 and show that the presence of two lattice cells of !-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 lowers energy when compared to Si(100)/ a-SiO2 Shadow cone calculations on three models of beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) are compared with Ion Beam Analysis of H-A processed Si(100). Total surface energy measurements via 3 liquid contact angle analysis of Si(100) after H-A method processing are also compared. By combining nanobonding experiments, TMAFM results, surface energy data, and ab-initio calculations, an atomistic model is derived and nanobonding is optimized. [1] US Patent 6,613,677 (9/2/03), 7,851,365 (12/14/10), [2] Patent Filed: 4/30/09, 10/1/2011

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Modeling mechanisms of water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces via experiments and applications

Description

Water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces is investigated to address the problem of fogging on silicone intraocular lenses (IOL) during cataract surgery, using Si(100), silica (SiO2) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

Water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces is investigated to address the problem of fogging on silicone intraocular lenses (IOL) during cataract surgery, using Si(100), silica (SiO2) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone (SiOC2H6)n. Condensation is described by two step nucleation and growth where roughness controls heterogeneous nucleation of droplets followed by Ostwald ripening. Wetting on hydrophilic surfaces consists of continuous aqueous films while hydrophobic surfaces exhibit fogging with discrete droplets. Si-based surfaces with wavelength above 200 nm exhibit fogging during condensation. Below 200 nm, surfaces are found to wet during condensation. Water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified via the surface free energy (SFE) using Sessile drop contact angle analysis, the Young-Dupré equation, and Van Oss theory. Topography is analyzed using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM). Polymer adsorption and ion beam modification of materials (IBMM) can modify surface topography, composition, and SFE, and alter water affinity of the Si-based surfaces we studied. Wet adsorption of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) C32H60O19 with areal densities ranging from 1018 atom/cm2 to 1019 atom/cm2 characterized via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), allows for the substrate to adopt the topography of the HPMC film and its hydrophilic properties. The HPMC surface composition maintains a bulk stoichiometric ratio as confirmed by 4.265 MeV 12C(α, α)12C and 3.045 MeV 16O(α, α)16O, and 2.8 MeV He++ elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen. Both PIXE and RBS methods give comparable areal density results of polymer films on Si(100), silica, and PDMS silicone substrates. The SFE and topography of PDMS silicone polymers used for IOLs can also be modified by IBMM. IBMM of HPMC cellulose occurs during IBA as well. Damage curves and ERD are shown to characterize surface desorption accurately during IBMM so that ion beam damage can be accounted for during analysis of polymer areal density and composition. IBMM of Si(100)-SiO2 ordered interfaces also induces changes of SFE, as ions disorder surface atoms. The SFE converges for all surfaces, hydrophobic and hydrophilic, as ions alter electrochemical properties of the surface via atomic and electronic displacements.

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Date Created
  • 2011