Matching Items (22)

134668-Thumbnail Image.png

An Examination of Family Literacy and Texting to Promote Early Learning

Description

Families play a major role in the learning and development of young children, and this is particularly true in the discipline of literacy. Family literacy emphasizes connecting with families to foster literacy learning and has been a major topic literacy

Families play a major role in the learning and development of young children, and this is particularly true in the discipline of literacy. Family literacy emphasizes connecting with families to foster literacy learning and has been a major topic literacy of research and practice for over the past 25 years. Initial work focused on the interactions and practices of families, but the key to promote literacy learning is connecting with families. Many programs have attempted to make these connections, but have only been successful at reaching small groups of families. The widespread use and accessibility of technology provides opportunities to connect with more families with greater ease. Text messaging is one form of technology that could be used to promote family literacy by more conveniently connecting with the families. This review of literature examines the use of texting to promote family literacy. First, it will focus on family literacy research and initiatives. Then, it will highlight the use of text messaging interventions, particularly to connect with families.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

157842-Thumbnail Image.png

A Middle School's Journey from Improvement Required towards Professional Learning Communities

Description

The focus of this research study was to better understand the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) culture within an urban middle school campus and to analyze if the intervention, intended to develop a campus PLC culture, had any

The focus of this research study was to better understand the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) culture within an urban middle school campus and to analyze if the intervention, intended to develop a campus PLC culture, had any positive or negative impact on student achievement. This mixed-methods research study utilized pre and post surveys and interviews with campus educators to delve into the perceptions of the development of a PLC culture within the middle school campus. Furthermore, student academic performance was explored through the analysis of state academic performance reports.

The first significant finding of this study was that the results of the concurrent method of data analysis affirmed that, potentially because of this intervention during the 2018-2019 academic school year, the middle school of this study did commence the development of a professional learning community culture. The second significant finding was that based on the data analyzed of student performance for the three previous academic years, student achievement did increase academically when accounting all students and all contents. Furthermore, both math and English language arts had the lowest percentage of students not meeting grade level standards since 2016. Finally, the largest subpopulation within the school campus, English Learner students, demonstrated large gains at 23 percentage points over the last three years in the academic performance tier of approaching grade level or above. This increase in academic performance by the students did ultimately lead to the campus performance rating to increase positively, as measured by the state of Texas.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

156238-Thumbnail Image.png

The failure project: self-efficacy, mindset, grit and navigating perceived failures in design and the arts

Description

Artists and designers are preparing for rapidly changing and competitive careers in creative fields that require a healthy dose of resiliency to persevere. However, little is known on how students within these fields become more self-efficacious, gritty, situated toward a

Artists and designers are preparing for rapidly changing and competitive careers in creative fields that require a healthy dose of resiliency to persevere. However, little is known on how students within these fields become more self-efficacious, gritty, situated toward a growth mindset, and persistent over time. This mixed-method action research study investigates how undergraduate arts and design college students approach and navigate perceptions of failure as well as incorporates an intervention course designed to increase their self-efficacy, growth mindset, and academic persistence. Participants were eighteen arts and design students representing a variety of disciplines from an eight-week, one-unit, 300-level course that utilized arts-based methods, mindfulness, and active reflection. After the course, students had significant changes in their self-efficacy and academic persistence as well as moderate significant change in their fixed mindset.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018

161396-Thumbnail Image.png

Positive Communication Skills and the IEP Meeting

Description

This action research is about empowering teachers to communicate positively in discourses with parents at Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings. It builds on the premise that giving teachers communications tools will increase their motivation to communicate more effectively and to

This action research is about empowering teachers to communicate positively in discourses with parents at Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings. It builds on the premise that giving teachers communications tools will increase their motivation to communicate more effectively and to be aware of their dialogue behavior. Taking a case study approach, I investigated how to encourage five special education teachers to communicate and involve parents. Parent reluctance to advocate for their student provided impetus to implement a teacher training program aimed at improving teacher ability to communicate with parents and engage their collaboration in IEP meeting processes. The methodology involved teacher interviews, IEP simulation group reflection training sessions, and IEP meeting observations. The study gave teachers an opportunity to self and group-reflect around issues of collaboration and effective communication with parents. The three-session virtual professional development (PD) covering sequential portions of an IEP meeting gave the teachers a sense of the communication flow of a meeting. Application of critical reflection to the joint community actions of role playing and discussions during the PD helped the teachers raise their communication awareness skills and carry over to their post-innovation IEP meetings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

161410-Thumbnail Image.png

Academic Integrity among University Journalism Students An Action Research Project to Study the Impact of Online Educational Modules

Description

Academic integrity among college students continues to be a problem at colleges and universities. This is particularly important for journalism students where ethical issues in the profession are critical, especially in an era of “fake news” and distrust in the

Academic integrity among college students continues to be a problem at colleges and universities. This is particularly important for journalism students where ethical issues in the profession are critical, especially in an era of “fake news” and distrust in the media. While most journalism students study professional ethics, they do not necessarily make the connection between their future careers and their academic career. In fact, at Western Washington University (Western) a recent exploration into academic dishonesty revealed that violations were increasing, and that journalism was one of the top three majors where violations occurred (based on percent of majors). To address this problem of practice, an online academic integrity resource – specific to journalism – was developed to see whether it could increase students’ knowledge as it relates to academic integrity and decrease violations. The mixed methods action research (MMAR) study took place during summer and fall quarter at Western Washington University, a state university located in Bellingham, Washington. Participants included students who were pre-majors, majors, and minors in the three tracks of journalism: news-editorial, public relations, and visual journalism. They were given multiple opportunities to self-enroll in the Resource for Ethical Academic Development (READ) Canvas course for academic integrity. Self-efficacy theory and social learning theory provided a framework for the study. Data was collected through pre- and post-innovation surveys as well as qualitative interviews. Quantitative results suggest that there is work yet to do in order to educate students about academic integrity and potential consequences of behavior. Qualitative results suggest that one avenue may be through an online resource that provides concise and comprehensive information, models behavior relevant to the student’s own discipline, and is easily accessible. It also suggests that a culture change from a systemic emphasis on grades to a focus on growth and individual learning may be beneficial.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

161589-Thumbnail Image.png

Examining the Effects of Self-Regulated Learning and Growth Mindset Instruction for Underprepared Students in Corequisite College Algebra

Description

The shift across developmental education from prerequisite to corequisite remediation has left students underprepared for college-level mathematics in need of additional support. Typically, this support takes the form of content remediation, but what happens when this extra help is reframed

The shift across developmental education from prerequisite to corequisite remediation has left students underprepared for college-level mathematics in need of additional support. Typically, this support takes the form of content remediation, but what happens when this extra help is reframed in terms of student learning skills and confidence? Taking place across four sections of College Algebra at a large community college in Texas, this mixed methods, quasi-experiment examined the academic and affective outcomes between students given the usual, content-centered remediation versus an intervention grounded in the theories of self-regulated learning and growth mindset. This intervention included explicit instruction on cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies and growth mindset principles, weekly reflective student learning journal writing prompts, and a reworking of formative assessments. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups, but higher exam scores by the intervention group indicate possible practical significance. Qualitative differences also emerged between the two groups with the intervention group self-reporting a wider variety and more frequent use of metacognitive learning strategies, demonstrating a higher degree of self-experimentation and strategic planning, and experiencing greater increases in external locus of control and self-confidence. Although many interesting avenues remain to be studied the incorporation of self-regulated learning and growth mindset principles may help students enrolled in corequisite algebra-based courses become more effective learners.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

157139-Thumbnail Image.png

An evaluation of business students' perceptions about their personal everyday creativity

Description

With organizations’ rising interest in creativity as one of the most sought out skill sets for graduates, it has become crucial to infuse creativity training in academic programs. This study evaluated freshmen business students’ perceptions about their personal, everyday creativity

With organizations’ rising interest in creativity as one of the most sought out skill sets for graduates, it has become crucial to infuse creativity training in academic programs. This study evaluated freshmen business students’ perceptions about their personal, everyday creativity and examined the influence of infusing creativity training in their freshmen seminar course.

This action research study drew upon the intersection of three creative self-belief theories from management and education psychology literature: Jaussi, et al (2007) Creative Identity Theory; Karwowski (2014) Creative Mindset Theory; and Tierney & Farmer (2002) Creative Self-efficacy Theory. These theories arguably stemmed from Burke (1991) Identity Theory; Dweck (2006) Mindset Theory; and Bandura (1977, 1997) Self-efficacy Theory, respectively. This approach was used to understand what factors influenced students’ perceptions about their personal, everyday creativity.

Freshmen business students participated in the study. A concurrent mixed methods approach was used to gather data from the students. Quantitative data came from a post- and retrospective pre-intervention survey that assessed four constructs: creative identity, creative self-efficacy, growth mindset, and fixed mindset. The data also came from the quantitative section of a post-workshop feedback survey asking to rate the effectiveness of each workshop. Qualitative data were gathered in several ways. Student interviews focused on asking how they defined creativity, shared reasons that motivated or inhibited them to practice creativity, and explained to what extent the workshops influenced them. Additional qualitative data came from student reflection essays and the qualitative section of a post-workshop feedback survey.

Research results suggested students gained an increased understanding in the importance of adopting a growth mindset, designating ‘creative’ as a critical identity and building confidence in their creative endeavors. The students’ interview and reflection essay data were consistent with the survey data. Finally, research results from the study highlighted the benefit of creativity training as a crucial, complementary, and iterative form of study in an academic setting allowing students to know themselves better and to prioritize their creative performances as part of their program learning outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

157153-Thumbnail Image.png

Producing positive perceptions: effects of video production in instructor introduction videos on student perceptions

Description

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent, specifically in the areas of perceived student-instructor communication and student-instructor

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent, specifically in the areas of perceived student-instructor communication and student-instructor connection. This study also examined which production style most accurately aligns student perceptions with instructor intent as well as which video production style is preferred by students.

Using a set of production guidelines, an instructor produced two introduction videos; one of low production value, one of high production value. Student participants were surveyed on their perceptions of the instructor as featured in both videos. The instructor was interviewed using similar questions in order to identify instructor intent and compare instructor intent to student perceptions.

Analysis of data showed that there was no statistical difference between video production value in students’ perceived student-instructor connection or student-instructor communication when compared to the instructor’s intent in the same areas. Data analysis also showed that a high production value was more accurate in portraying instructor intent, however a low production value was preferred by students and portrayed the instructor more positively.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

157661-Thumbnail Image.png

Technology Integration with Teacher Educators

Description

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in K-12 classrooms, an area where many higher education or teaching

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in K-12 classrooms, an area where many higher education or teaching faculty may not feel comfortable or fluent enough to support preservice teachers or to model in their own instruction.

This action research study aimed to understand how faculty develop Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in ways that will help them to enhance their instruction and model technology integration for preservice teachers. An online community was created that allowed teacher educators to interact synchronously or asynchronously to collaborate, learn, and practice new technological skills. This community served as a place for teacher educators to play with new technology and to share their ideas and practices with their peers—ideally to begin the process of developing the knowledge and fluency with technology that would allow them to better support teacher education students.

Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to explore faculty’s development of TPACK. A pre-survey, retrospective pre-survey, and post-survey were administered and analyzed. Also, interviews of participants and observations of the online community were used to collect qualitative data.

The results of the study showed an increase in participants’ confidence for selecting technologies to enhance their instruction after they participated in the online community. Also, the participants felt more confident using strategies that combine content, technologies, and teaching approaches in their classrooms or other learning environments.

In Chapter 5, a discussion of the findings was presented, in which several main implications are shared for researchers who might be engaged in similar work. Also, the lessons learned from this action research are explained, as well as the limitations experienced in this study.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

155294-Thumbnail Image.png

Rithöfundursögur or writer sagas: a narrative inquiry of 10th-graders' compositions of agentic writer identity in a choice-rich, self-reflective, and mindset-supportive English class

Description

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study was to investigate students' negotiation of agentic writer identity in

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study was to investigate students' negotiation of agentic writer identity in a course that featured a three-strand intervention: (a) a high degree of student choice; (b) ongoing written self-reflection; and (c) ongoing instruction in mindset. The researcher drew on self-determination theory and identity theory to operationalize agentic writer identity around three constructs—behaviors, identity, and belief. A questionnaire was used to identify an array of cases that would illustrate a range of experiences around agentic writer identity. Questionnaire data were analyzed to identify a sample from which to collect qualitative data and to identify prominent central relations among the three constructs, which were further explored in the second stage through the qualitative data. Qualitative data were gathered from a primary group of six students in the form of student journals and interviews around the central constructs of writing belief, writing behavior, and writer identity. Using a snowballing sampling method, four students were added to the sample group to form a second tier of data. The corpus of qualitative data from all 10 students was coded and analyzed using the technique of re-storying to produce a narrative interpretation, in the style of the Norse saga, of students' engagement in agentic writing behaviors, espousal of agentic writing beliefs, and construction of agentic writer identities. A defense of the chosen narrative approach and genre was provided. Interpretation of the re-storied data was provided, including discussion of interaction among themes that emerged from the data and the re-storying process. Emergent themes and phenomena from the re-storied data were realigned with the quantitative data as well as with the constructs that informed the survey design and sampling. Implications for classroom teachers, as well as suggestions for further research, were suggested.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017