Matching Items (15)

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An Examination of Family Literacy and Texting to Promote Early Learning

Description

Families play a major role in the learning and development of young children, and this is particularly true in the discipline of literacy. Family literacy emphasizes connecting with families to

Families play a major role in the learning and development of young children, and this is particularly true in the discipline of literacy. Family literacy emphasizes connecting with families to foster literacy learning and has been a major topic literacy of research and practice for over the past 25 years. Initial work focused on the interactions and practices of families, but the key to promote literacy learning is connecting with families. Many programs have attempted to make these connections, but have only been successful at reaching small groups of families. The widespread use and accessibility of technology provides opportunities to connect with more families with greater ease. Text messaging is one form of technology that could be used to promote family literacy by more conveniently connecting with the families. This review of literature examines the use of texting to promote family literacy. First, it will focus on family literacy research and initiatives. Then, it will highlight the use of text messaging interventions, particularly to connect with families.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Recovery 101: providing peer-to-peer support to students in recovery

Description

Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are university-sanctioned initiatives for students in recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Given the ever-rising rates of alcohol and opioid use and misuse, a great

Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are university-sanctioned initiatives for students in recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Given the ever-rising rates of alcohol and opioid use and misuse, a great need exists to understand how to provide support for those who are considering recovery or who choose a recovery lifestyle in college. The purpose of this action research study was to examine peer-to-peer support for students in recovery. The development of two training innovations, Recovery 101 and Recovery Ally, were delivered to health and wellness peer educators called the Well Devil Ambassadors (WDAs) with the goal of equipping them to better support their peers in recovery. Learning objectives for the training were to gain knowledge about addiction and recovery and to enhance positive attitudes toward students in recovery, which could thereby increase self-efficacy and behavior intention to work with their peers in recovery. Mindfulness was included in the trainings to enhance the WDAs’ experience and provide tools for a self-care skillset. Quantitative data included pre, post, and follow-up surveys for the Recovery 101 training. Qualitative data included short-answer questions following Recovery 101 training and in-depth interviews following Recovery Ally training. Findings indicated that the information provided in Recovery 101 built the WDAs’ knowledge on the topics of addiction and recovery; hearing multiple perspectives from students in recovery allowed the WDAs to increase empathy toward students in recovery; and the building of knowledge, empathy, and mindfulness allowed the WDAs to gain self-efficacy and behavior intention when supporting their peers in recovery.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Designerly Ways of Teaching: Reflecting on folk pedagogies in design education

Description

The profession known as industrial design is undergoing a transformation. Design thinking and strategy are replacing form giving and styling. Critics are calling for curricular reform to meet the changing

The profession known as industrial design is undergoing a transformation. Design thinking and strategy are replacing form giving and styling. Critics are calling for curricular reform to meet the changing needs of practice, yet surprisingly little knowledge is available about how and why design teachers do what they do. In an effort to frame the problem of (re)designing design education, this study provides a framework for understanding the pedagogical beliefs and preferences of design students and educators utilizing Bruner’s four folk pedagogies. This study also provides evidence that the practices of industrial design teachers exhibit what Cross (2006) has described as ‘designerly ways of knowing.’

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Technology Integration with Teacher Educators

Description

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in K-12 classrooms, an area where many higher education or teaching faculty may not feel comfortable or fluent enough to support preservice teachers or to model in their own instruction.

This action research study aimed to understand how faculty develop Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in ways that will help them to enhance their instruction and model technology integration for preservice teachers. An online community was created that allowed teacher educators to interact synchronously or asynchronously to collaborate, learn, and practice new technological skills. This community served as a place for teacher educators to play with new technology and to share their ideas and practices with their peers—ideally to begin the process of developing the knowledge and fluency with technology that would allow them to better support teacher education students.

Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to explore faculty’s development of TPACK. A pre-survey, retrospective pre-survey, and post-survey were administered and analyzed. Also, interviews of participants and observations of the online community were used to collect qualitative data.

The results of the study showed an increase in participants’ confidence for selecting technologies to enhance their instruction after they participated in the online community. Also, the participants felt more confident using strategies that combine content, technologies, and teaching approaches in their classrooms or other learning environments.

In Chapter 5, a discussion of the findings was presented, in which several main implications are shared for researchers who might be engaged in similar work. Also, the lessons learned from this action research are explained, as well as the limitations experienced in this study.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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A Middle School's Journey from Improvement Required towards Professional Learning Communities

Description

The focus of this research study was to better understand the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) culture within an urban middle school campus and to analyze if the

The focus of this research study was to better understand the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) culture within an urban middle school campus and to analyze if the intervention, intended to develop a campus PLC culture, had any positive or negative impact on student achievement. This mixed-methods research study utilized pre and post surveys and interviews with campus educators to delve into the perceptions of the development of a PLC culture within the middle school campus. Furthermore, student academic performance was explored through the analysis of state academic performance reports.

The first significant finding of this study was that the results of the concurrent method of data analysis affirmed that, potentially because of this intervention during the 2018-2019 academic school year, the middle school of this study did commence the development of a professional learning community culture. The second significant finding was that based on the data analyzed of student performance for the three previous academic years, student achievement did increase academically when accounting all students and all contents. Furthermore, both math and English language arts had the lowest percentage of students not meeting grade level standards since 2016. Finally, the largest subpopulation within the school campus, English Learner students, demonstrated large gains at 23 percentage points over the last three years in the academic performance tier of approaching grade level or above. This increase in academic performance by the students did ultimately lead to the campus performance rating to increase positively, as measured by the state of Texas.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Rithöfundursögur or writer sagas: a narrative inquiry of 10th-graders' compositions of agentic writer identity in a choice-rich, self-reflective, and mindset-supportive English class

Description

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study was to investigate students' negotiation of agentic writer identity in a course that featured a three-strand intervention: (a) a high degree of student choice; (b) ongoing written self-reflection; and (c) ongoing instruction in mindset. The researcher drew on self-determination theory and identity theory to operationalize agentic writer identity around three constructs—behaviors, identity, and belief. A questionnaire was used to identify an array of cases that would illustrate a range of experiences around agentic writer identity. Questionnaire data were analyzed to identify a sample from which to collect qualitative data and to identify prominent central relations among the three constructs, which were further explored in the second stage through the qualitative data. Qualitative data were gathered from a primary group of six students in the form of student journals and interviews around the central constructs of writing belief, writing behavior, and writer identity. Using a snowballing sampling method, four students were added to the sample group to form a second tier of data. The corpus of qualitative data from all 10 students was coded and analyzed using the technique of re-storying to produce a narrative interpretation, in the style of the Norse saga, of students' engagement in agentic writing behaviors, espousal of agentic writing beliefs, and construction of agentic writer identities. A defense of the chosen narrative approach and genre was provided. Interpretation of the re-storied data was provided, including discussion of interaction among themes that emerged from the data and the re-storying process. Emergent themes and phenomena from the re-storied data were realigned with the quantitative data as well as with the constructs that informed the survey design and sampling. Implications for classroom teachers, as well as suggestions for further research, were suggested.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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An evaluation of business students' perceptions about their personal everyday creativity

Description

With organizations’ rising interest in creativity as one of the most sought out skill sets for graduates, it has become crucial to infuse creativity training in academic programs. This study

With organizations’ rising interest in creativity as one of the most sought out skill sets for graduates, it has become crucial to infuse creativity training in academic programs. This study evaluated freshmen business students’ perceptions about their personal, everyday creativity and examined the influence of infusing creativity training in their freshmen seminar course.

This action research study drew upon the intersection of three creative self-belief theories from management and education psychology literature: Jaussi, et al (2007) Creative Identity Theory; Karwowski (2014) Creative Mindset Theory; and Tierney & Farmer (2002) Creative Self-efficacy Theory. These theories arguably stemmed from Burke (1991) Identity Theory; Dweck (2006) Mindset Theory; and Bandura (1977, 1997) Self-efficacy Theory, respectively. This approach was used to understand what factors influenced students’ perceptions about their personal, everyday creativity.

Freshmen business students participated in the study. A concurrent mixed methods approach was used to gather data from the students. Quantitative data came from a post- and retrospective pre-intervention survey that assessed four constructs: creative identity, creative self-efficacy, growth mindset, and fixed mindset. The data also came from the quantitative section of a post-workshop feedback survey asking to rate the effectiveness of each workshop. Qualitative data were gathered in several ways. Student interviews focused on asking how they defined creativity, shared reasons that motivated or inhibited them to practice creativity, and explained to what extent the workshops influenced them. Additional qualitative data came from student reflection essays and the qualitative section of a post-workshop feedback survey.

Research results suggested students gained an increased understanding in the importance of adopting a growth mindset, designating ‘creative’ as a critical identity and building confidence in their creative endeavors. The students’ interview and reflection essay data were consistent with the survey data. Finally, research results from the study highlighted the benefit of creativity training as a crucial, complementary, and iterative form of study in an academic setting allowing students to know themselves better and to prioritize their creative performances as part of their program learning outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Design Thinking Instructional Problems (DTIP): exploring the perspectives of K-14 STEM teachers on the DTIP approach to developing instructional lessons

Description

A reform movement in the United States has focused on STEM education and 21st century soft skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity. This spotlight on STEM

A reform movement in the United States has focused on STEM education and 21st century soft skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity. This spotlight on STEM instruction provided an opportunity to explore how K-14 STEM teacher participants perceived a Design Thinking Instructional Problems (DTIP) approach to developing instructional lessons. The study used a convergent parallel mixed-methods design with a survey instrument and a multiple case study focused on K-14 in-service STEM teachers. Data were collected from teacher participants during two five-week summer Research Experience for Teachers (RET) programs as part of two separate National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Engineering Research Centers (ERC) located at a large southwestern university in the United States (n=16). The study was conducted over three phases. During Phase I and II, teacher participants experienced a Design Thinking Overview workshop and weekly DTIP professional development sessions to facilitate the development of an RET instructional lesson. Pre- and post-program DTIP surveys and background interviews were conducted with all teacher participants (n=16). From this original group, teacher participants were selected as cases. Implementation observations and post-implementation interviews were conducted with these case-teachers (n=10). The study included frequency analysis and descriptive statistics of survey data. Qualitative data were analyzed using direct interpretation, thematic analysis, and open coding with the constant comparative method. A variety of arrays, summaries, and matrices were used to visualize patterns across and within individual case-teacher results. All 16 teacher participants viewed themselves as designers solving complex instructional problems. All 16 teacher participants found the DTIP professional development sessions to have somewhat to very much provided additional value during their RET summer programs. Six of the 10 case-teachers perceived the DTIP model graphic as mostly to completely corresponding to the way in which they developed their RET instructional lesson. Lastly, eight of the 10 case-teachers chose to embed a Design Thinking student learning strategy into the RET instructional lesson they developed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Soft skills in high school

Description

Soft skills encompass a wide variety of skills that are necessary to be successful in school and in the workplace. From time management to goal setting, communication and collaboration, the

Soft skills encompass a wide variety of skills that are necessary to be successful in school and in the workplace. From time management to goal setting, communication and collaboration, the non-cognitive, or soft skills, are fundamental to academic success However, even with their importance, soft skills are often not explicitly taught. The purpose of this action research study was to explore the impact of teaching soft skills to high school students.

A soft skills curriculum was created using self-efficacy theory which serves as the heart of Bandura’s (1977) Social Learning Theory. Specifically, the soft skills were taught, modeled, and then practiced by the participants. The Soft Skills Training Group (SSTG) consisted of eight sessions and covered five soft skills: communication, collaboration, time management, work ethic, and goal setting. Additional soft skills related to employability were also covered. These consisted of creating a resume, completing a job application, and practicing job interviews.

Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Quantitative data included student and teacher Soft Skills Survey results. Qualitative data included student homework assignments and work produced during the intervention. Reflection sheets were completed after each session to serve as a self-assessment of new knowledge and application of the soft skills covered each session. At the conclusion of the SSTG intervention participants were also interviewed to gather qualitative data about their experience in the group.

Results indicate that although high school students had received some training in soft skills, they lacked the motivation to consistently use their knowledge of soft skills in the classroom. As suggested by previous research, soft skills require hands on practice and constructive feedback to increase student use of soft skills on a regular basis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Utilizing the prospect of transfer to increase academic engagement in high school equivalency students within a wicked problems framework

Description

This study examined the influence of perceived transfer of learning on student engagement, completion rates, and attendance hours of high school equivalency (HSE) students within a Wicked Problems Framework. Local

This study examined the influence of perceived transfer of learning on student engagement, completion rates, and attendance hours of high school equivalency (HSE) students within a Wicked Problems Framework. Local research had shown that over 30% of HSE students stopped attending HSE classes prior to completing 40 instructional hours, and many students cited a lack of relevant, “real-world” application, and the need to pursue employment as the two most common reasons that they stopped attending.

To address this issue, an innovation was developed and deployed for one semester at the Rio Salado College Avondale location. The innovation identified the individual career interests of each student in a treatment group, then worked with industry experts in those career fields to develop PowerPoint slides explaining how each HSE math lesson would directly transfer to the student’s career of interest. In addition, hiring managers from each career field that the students expressed interest in visited the class to discuss the need for HSE math skills and to answer any questions about their career and the transferability of what the students were learning.

The treatment groups’ attendance hours, completion rates, and self-reported engagement were examined and compared all other HSE math classes at Rio Salado College that took place during the same semester, as well as compared to the instructor of the innovation’s previous math classes. The results showed that students who participated in the innovation had, on average, over 38 more attendance hours than students who did not receive the innovation during the same semester and over 44 more attendance hours than the instructor’s previous classes at the same location. In addition, students who participated in the innovation reported higher engagement and enjoyment in the class than in similar HSE classes that they had previously taken.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018