Matching Items (26)

132138-Thumbnail Image.png

Vanguards of Global Justice: Organizing Support for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

Description

This document reviews social and legal issues with Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URMs) as they interact with different government agencies and non-profit organizations. It also explores ideas that have been proposed

This document reviews social and legal issues with Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URMs) as they interact with different government agencies and non-profit organizations. It also explores ideas that have been proposed to improve policies regarding URM placement and government agency reporting processes. The service quality of Unaccompanied Refugee Minor (URM) programs should be recorded to study the return on investment for URMs and the outcome of their long-term social development. Tracking the development of these youths would help with analyzing the effectiveness of state, federal and nonprofit programs in facilitating URM assimilation in the United States. This document demonstrates different ways to improve governmental and nonprofit policies to better serve the welfare of URMs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

132597-Thumbnail Image.png

Knowledge Networks and Innovation for Creating Value in Biochar Production Systems

Description

Extensive literature exists examining the maximum mitigation potential of
biochar. This research has found biochar to hold massive potential as a means of stabilizing current levels of atmospheric carbon.

Extensive literature exists examining the maximum mitigation potential of
biochar. This research has found biochar to hold massive potential as a means of stabilizing current levels of atmospheric carbon. Furthermore, the research and resources to massively expand biochar production exist, yet one could easily argue the industry is not expanding quickly enough given its known potential benefits. This paper serves to address this lack of growth, and identified a lack of formalized networks for knowledge and innovation exchanges amongst biochar production firms as a leading obstacle to quick expansion. I focus on two particular biochar production firms operating in vastly different contexts and analyze both through a conceptual framework known as “knowledge networks”. In depth literature on the topic of knowledge networks highlight the dynamics of exchange, including the obstacles in establishing such a network. I applied the findings from a multitude of case studies centered around knowledge networks to biochar production, asserting that exchange networks centered around reciprocity would serve as a catalyst to the growth of the biochar industry. I also assert that public research institutions such as Arizona State University would play a critical role in such a network, as they would serve as a mutual party connecting two private entities. Private biochar production firms around the world would be exposed to new knowledge and information that would serve to maximize the energy value of their product while reducing the environmental externalities associated with their process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132892-Thumbnail Image.png

Green Charcoal: Case of Innovation Ecosystem in Nepal’s Renewable Energy System

Description

There is an increasing need to understand and develop clean cooking technologies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The provision of clean energy where modern energy is not available is

There is an increasing need to understand and develop clean cooking technologies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The provision of clean energy where modern energy is not available is important in advancing the 17 sustainable development goals as set by the United Nations. Green charcoal is a cooking fuel technology made from ground and compressed biochar, an organic material made from heating a feedstock (biomass, forest residues, agriculture waste, invasive species, etc.) in an oxygen deprived environment to high temperatures. Green charcoal behaves similarly to wood charcoal or coal but is different from these energy products in that it is produced from biomass, not from wood or fossil fuels. Green charcoal has gained prominence as a cooking fuel technology in South-East Asia recently. Within the context of Nepal, green charcoal is currently being produced using lantana camara, an invasive species in Nepal, as a feedstock in order to commoditize the otherwise destructive plant. The purpose of this study was to understand the innovation ecosystem of green charcoal within the context of Nepal’s renewable energy sector. An innovation ecosystem is all of the actors, users and conditions that contribute to the success of a particular method of value creation. Through a series of field interviews, it was determined that the main actors of the green charcoal innovation ecosystem are forest resources governance agencies, biochar producers, boundary organizations, briquette producers, distributors/vendors, the political economy of energy, and the food culture of individuals. The end user (user segment) of this innovation ecosystem is restaurants. Each actor was further analyzed based on the Ecosystem Pie Model methodology as created by Talmar, et al. using the actor’s individual resources, activities, value addition, value capture, dependence on green charcoal and the associated risk as the building blocks for analysis. Based on ecosystem analysis, suggestions were made on how to strengthen the green charcoal innovation ecosystem in Nepal’s renewable energy sector based on actor-actor and actor-green charcoal interactions, associated risks and dependence, and existing knowledge and technology gaps. It was determined that simply deploying a clean cooking technology does not guarantee success of the technology. Rather, there are a multitude of factors that contribute to the success of the clean cooking technology that deserve equal amounts of attention in order to successfully implement the technology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

134475-Thumbnail Image.png

Biodiesel: Sustainable Production and Commercialization for Community Support

Description

This research focused on how low-income communities in Ghana could convert Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) into biodiesel to supplement their energy demands. The 2016 World Energy Outlook estimates that about

This research focused on how low-income communities in Ghana could convert Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) into biodiesel to supplement their energy demands. The 2016 World Energy Outlook estimates that about 8 million Ghanaians do not have access to electricity while 82% of the population use biomass as cooking fuel. However, WVO is available in almost every home and is also largely produced by hotels and schools. There are over 2,700 registered hotels and more than 28,000 educational institutions from Basic to the Tertiary level. Currently, most WVOs are often discarded in open gutters or left to go rancid and later disposed of. Therefore, WVOs serve as cheap materials available in large quantities with a high potential for conversion into biodiesel and commercializing to support the economic needs of low-income communities. In 2013, a group of researchers at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Ghana estimated that the country could be producing between 82,361 and 85,904 tons of biodiesel from WVOs generated by hotels alone in 2015. Further analysis was also carried out to examine the Ghana National Biofuel Policy that was introduced in 2005 with support from the Ghana Energy Commission. Based on the information identified in the research, a set of recommendations were made to help the central government in promoting the biodiesel industry in Ghana, with a focus on low-income or farming communities. Lastly, a self-sustaining biodiesel production model with high potential for commercialization, was proposed to enable low-income communities to produce their own biodiesel from WVOs to meet their energy demands.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

131170-Thumbnail Image.png

The History and Evolution of SUVs: Predicting Future SUVs

Description

Sport Utility Vehicles have grown to be one of the most popular vehicle choices in the automotive industry. This thesis explores the history of SUVs with their roots starting in

Sport Utility Vehicles have grown to be one of the most popular vehicle choices in the automotive industry. This thesis explores the history of SUVs with their roots starting in the 1930s up until 2020 in order to understand the essence of what an SUV is. The definition applied to the SUV for this thesis is as follows: a vehicle that is larger and more capable than the average sedan by offering more interior space, cargo area, and possibly off-road capability. This definition must be sufficiently broad to encompass the diverse market that manufactures are calling SUVs. Then the trends of what current (2020) SUVs are experiencing are analyzed from three major aspects: sociology, economics, and technology. Sociology focuses on the roles an SUV fulfills and the type of people who own SUVs. The economics section reviews the profitability of SUVs and their dependence on a nation’s economic strength. Technology pertains to the trends in safety features and other advances such as autonomous or electric vehicles. From these current and past trends, predictions could be made on future SUVs. In regards to sociology, trends indicate that SUVs will be more comfortable as newly entering luxury brands will be able to innovate aspects of comfort. In addition, SUVs will offer more performance models so manufacturers can reach a wider variety of demographics. Economic trends revealed that SUVs are at risk of losing popularity as the economy enters a hard time due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Technological trends revealed that hybrids and electric vehicles will now move into the SUV market starting with the more compact sizes to help improve manufacturer’s fleet fuel efficiency.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

135864-Thumbnail Image.png

GlobalResolve: A Digital Story

Description

This project is a web development effort to improve the web presence of GlobalResolve. Established in 2006, GlobalResolve has directly improved the lives of underprivileged people locally and in underdeveloped

This project is a web development effort to improve the web presence of GlobalResolve. Established in 2006, GlobalResolve has directly improved the lives of underprivileged people locally and in underdeveloped nations throughout the world. This social entrepreneurship program at Arizona State University has enhanced the educational experience of students and faculty by involving them in real world projects that have shown direct results. The initiative goes beyond the traditional model of philanthropy but works to establish successful business ventures of solutions to provide sustainable economic development to the underserved communities they work with. GlobalResolve: A Digital Story is a website that was proposed to help improve the current GlobalResolve website and make a more compelling presentation of the program in hopes of attracting new funding for new projects and also student to be involved as problem solvers. The problems seen in the current website are: lack of student testimonials, sense of up keeping, context in the use of multimedia, and best web design practices. The resulting objectives for the new site were: build a product that would assist in publicizing the GlobalResolve program and tell its story to future students and prospects and potential donors. The new website solved these issues by: incorporating student experiences, embedding social media widgets regarding current projects, details of multimedia elements to provide context, and researching and implementing best design practices. The new website was developed to be an interactive experience, delivering the story of the initiative from its beginnings to it current state. The information is presented on a website with data maps, digital timelines, and short video clips, to give a thorough, interesting, and an explanation of GlobalResolve. With the incorporation of photos and graphics to assist, the website was designed to tell a compelling, composing informative yet engaging digital media. This was confirmed by doing a beta test of the website. This project evolved in many ways as an effective ways of relating information. Ultimately, the goal of this thesis was to make a digital case statement for the initiative, in order to create a clear message to prospects and potential donors. The case statement represents GlobalResolve's digital needs and how those needs can be achieved. Using digital tools and marketing, the website was approached as a strategic business plan and meant to deliver a more effective representation of the program, while setting up a template to be used for future use to allow updates that can show the progressive success of GlobalResolve.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

135383-Thumbnail Image.png

The Business Venture Approach to Alleviating Poverty: What is the Bottom of the Pyramid Solution and Can It Work?

Description

Billions of people around the world deal with the struggles of poverty every day. Consequently, a number of others have committed themselves to help alleviate poverty. Many various methods are

Billions of people around the world deal with the struggles of poverty every day. Consequently, a number of others have committed themselves to help alleviate poverty. Many various methods are used, and a current consensus on the best method to alleviate poverty is lacking. Generally the methods used or researched exist somewhere on the spectrum between top-down and bottom-up approaches to fighting poverty. This paper analyzes a specific method proposed by C.K. Prahalad known as the Bottom of the Pyramid solution. The premise of the method is that large multinational corporations should utilize the large conglomerate of money that exists amongst poor people \u2014 created due to the sheer number of poor people \u2014 for business ventures. Concurrently, the poor people can benefit from the company's entrance. This method has received acclaim theoretically, but still needs empirical evidence to prove its practicality. This paper compares this approach with other approaches, considers international development data trends, and analyzes case studies of actual attempts that provide insight into the approach's potential for success. The market of poor people at the bottom of the pyramid is extremely segmented which makes it very difficult for large companies to financially prosper. It is even harder to establish mutual benefit between the large corporation and the poor. It has been found that although aspects of the bottom of the pyramid method hold merit, higher potential for alleviating poverty exists when small companies venture into this space rather than large multinational corporations. Small companies can conform to a single community and niche economy to prosper \u2014 a flexibility that large companies lack. Moving forward, analyzing the actual attempts provides the best and only empirical insights; hence, it will be important to consider more approaches into developing economies as they materialize.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135392-Thumbnail Image.png

Preparing Students to be Agents of Change in the Community: A Call to Action for Higher Education Stakeholders

Description

In recent history, the world has been inspired to respond to the challenges faced by communities with ‘help’. This help has been administered with moderate success through community engagement strategies

In recent history, the world has been inspired to respond to the challenges faced by communities with ‘help’. This help has been administered with moderate success through community engagement strategies traditionally centered on social services provided through non-profit agencies. Social entrepreneurship has emerged in response to the lack of progress made in solving local and global issues with new innovations that have the potential to change the status quo and eliminate the problems for future generations. In social entrepreneurship, concerned individuals saw an opportunity to truly change the world. Higher education leaders have embraced social entrepreneurship, positioning university students as a driving force behind ideating creative and innovative solutions that can be implemented in communities to overcome a vast array of challenges from poverty to environmental sustainability. Despite the efforts of university staff and faculty, many student changemakers struggle to successfully implement their ideas and measure their impact. Factors such as how well the student understands the issue and community in addition to the extent to which the student is experienced in ideation, creative-problem solving, and implementation of projects contribute to the success or failure of a student social effort. Inspired by their experiences serving as director of Changemaker Central, the authors sought to understand the process of preparing students to be agents of change in the community. Having observed the variance in success among aspiring changemakers at Arizona State University (ASU), the researchers studied how to best support students in preparation for a high-impact career. The research analyzed students’ experiences in two of ASU’s social change programs, Changemaker Challenge (CC) and University Service-Learning (USL) and found a need for more cohesion between two programs and their represented methodologies in addition to a need for in-depth analysis on the student journey.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133348-Thumbnail Image.png

Creating a Human-Powered Water Pump for the Maasai Community in Kenya and the Developing World: Creative Project

Description

The inception of the human-powered water pump began during my trip to Maasailand in Kenya over the Summer of 2017. Being one of the few Broadening the Reach of Engineering

The inception of the human-powered water pump began during my trip to Maasailand in Kenya over the Summer of 2017. Being one of the few Broadening the Reach of Engineering through Community Engagement (BRECE) Scholars at Arizona State University, I was given the opportunity to join Prescott College (PC) on their annual trip to the Maasai Education, Research, and Conservation (MERC) Institute in rural Kenya. The ASU BRECE scholars that choose to travel were asked to collaborate with the local Maasai community to help develop functional and sustainable engineering solutions to problems identified alongside community members using rudimentary technology and tools that were available in this resource-constrained setting. This initiative evolved into multiple projects from the installation of GravityLights (a local invention that powers LEDs with falling sandbags), the construction/installation of smokeless stoves, and development of a much-needed solution to move water from the rainwater collection tanks around camp to other locations. This last project listed was prototyped once in camp, and this report details subsequent iterations of this human-powered pump.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Best Practices for Projectors Used in Theatrical Environments

Description

I. Executive Summary Projectors are used in more and more live and corporate events and theatrical productions. In these environments, they are subject to a myriad of conditions. These can

I. Executive Summary Projectors are used in more and more live and corporate events and theatrical productions. In these environments, they are subject to a myriad of conditions. These can include extreme temperatures, atmospheric effects and contaminates, shipping and rough handling, and power issues. The goal is to find ways to extend the reliable and economical lifespan of these machines increasing companies ROI and decreasing environmental damage from more frequent production, repair and disposal. The first area studied was the effect removing the covers has on the projector performance. This is important knowledge for both the research protocols followed in this research and in normal use during maintenance and repair. Testing demonstrated that the removal of covers on small consumer projectors has a profound impact on internal temperatures and can even cause overheating due to the covers being used as air ducting. The main focus of this project was finding effective pre-filters for use around haze, fog and other airborne contaminates. This was successful with two material being demonstrated to be cost effective, filter far superior to factory filters alone, and produce acceptable impacts on projector cooling in several models and types of projector. These filters cost typically less than $1 per filter and reduce the ingress of contaminates by 60-80%. Additionally the effects of improper shutdown versus the manufacturers specified shutdown process were tested. It was determined that the projectors where power was unplugged or turned off had components exceed both operating temperatures and temperatures during the normal shutdown. This shows that following the correct shutdown process keeps components cooler leading to a longer component life and therefore longer projector life and decreased repairs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05