Matching Items (6)

151831-Thumbnail Image.png

Mathematics in a second grade classroom: the effects of cognitively guided problem solving

Description

The need for improved mathematics education in many of America's schools that serve students from low income households has been extensively documented. This practical action research study, set in a

The need for improved mathematics education in many of America's schools that serve students from low income households has been extensively documented. This practical action research study, set in a suburban Title I school with a primarily Hispanic, non-native English speaking population, is designed to explore the effects of the progression through a set of problem solving solution strategies on the mathematics problem solving abilities of 2nd grade students. Students worked in class with partners to complete a Cognitively Guided Instruction-style (CGI) mathematics word problem using a dictated solution strategy five days a week for twelve weeks, three or four weeks for each of four solution strategies. The phases included acting out the problem using realia, representing the problem using standard mathematics manipulatives, modeling the problem using a schematic representation, and solving the problem using a number sentence. Data were collected using a five question problem solving pre- and post-assessment, video recorded observations, and Daily Answer Recording Slips or Mathematics Problem Solving Journals. Findings showed that this problem solving innovation was effective in increasing the problem solving abilities of all participants in this study, with an average increase of 63% in the number of pre-assessment to post-assessment questions answered correctly. Additionally, students increased the complexity of solutions used to solve problems and decreased the rate of guessing at answers to word problems. Further rounds of research looking into the direct effects of the MKO are suggested as next steps of research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

151697-Thumbnail Image.png

Using social media and professional learning communities as tools for novice teacher collegiality and improved self-efficacy

Description

Teacher attrition and the migration between schools and districts can have a negative impact on quality of education and teacher performance. Novice teachers leave the profession because they are overwhelmed

Teacher attrition and the migration between schools and districts can have a negative impact on quality of education and teacher performance. Novice teachers leave the profession because they are overwhelmed by the workload and responsibilities of the job. In a previous action research cycle, I found that novice teachers' perceptions of isolation and lack of opportunities to share experiences had a negative effect on teacher perceptions of efficacy. This action research project examines the effect of leveraging social media and professional learning communities to provide opportunities for a group of novice teachers to share experiences and seek advice. By addressing the challenges that novice teachers face and providing solutions for common problems, it is the hope of this researcher that highly effective teachers will remain in the classroom. The results of the study indicate that the combined use of Twitter and YouTube in collaboration with professional learning communities will improve teacher perceptions of efficacy. Teachers who participated in the social media based professional learning communities are also more likely to remain in the classroom.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

150475-Thumbnail Image.png

The missing link: emotional intelligence in teacher preparation

Description

The purpose of this action research study was to examine the effects the Six Seconds model on the emotional intelligence development of teacher candidates in a teacher education program described

The purpose of this action research study was to examine the effects the Six Seconds model on the emotional intelligence development of teacher candidates in a teacher education program described above. How would this focus impact a teacher candidate's ability navigate the emotional aspects of teaching, exercise optimism, and make daily choices based on a greater sense of purpose? A mixed-methods (QUAL-quant ) was employed to investigate this question and to gain a greater understanding of emotional intelligence in the teaching profession. The Six Seconds model of emotional intelligence was used as a foundation for the intervention and data collection. Data were collected through an emotional intelligence assessment, a teaching satisfaction survey, semi-structured interviews, observations, field notes, training transcripts, training artifacts, and a participant journal. The results from the study indicated that the Six Seconds model has the potential to positively impact emotional intelligence development in teacher candidates. Moreover, the study resulted in broader assertions about emotional intelligence development among future teachers. Emotional intelligence starts with a commitment to change. Second, teacher candidates must have the opportunity to continuously apply new learning in an environment conducive to EQ development. Finally, the pursuit of a noble goal is critical to the application of all other emotional intelligence competencies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

151556-Thumbnail Image.png

Not separate, but not quite equal: undocumented high school students, dual enrollment, non-resident college tuition and the dream of a college education

Description

Immigration status and educational opportunities are at the forefront of the current national conversation regarding "DREAMers": children of immigrants brought to the United States at a young age who lack

Immigration status and educational opportunities are at the forefront of the current national conversation regarding "DREAMers": children of immigrants brought to the United States at a young age who lack legal status but are raised and educated in the American system. In 2006, Arizona voters passed Proposition 300, in part prohibiting in-state tuition for state colleges and universities to individuals who cannot provide proof of citizenship or legal residency. For those DREAMers who hoped to attend college following high school, this policy affected their ability to enroll because of the increased tuition and lack of eligibility for state-sponsored financial aid. This law's impact is also present in Arizona's public high schools. High schools, in partnership with community colleges, have created a robust system of dual or concurrent enrollment courses: college classes offered to high school students as a means of accelerating their learning. In this arrangement, full payments for tuition are required by families or by the programs that support the students, creating a system in public schools where some students are able to participate while others cannot due to their residency status. The aim of this study was to determine the educational, social, and emotional effects of Proposition 300 upon undocumented secondary students. Through qualitative analysis, this study relies upon focus group interviews with high school graduates impacted by Proposition 300 before graduation. Interviews were also conducted with parents and with educators representing both secondary and higher education. A total of nine students, two parents, and four education professionals participated in semi-structured conversations over the course of several months in the fall of 2012. The data was collected, analyzed, and coded, extrapolating common themes related to the review of literature and information from the participants. The findings describe the effects Proposition 300 has had as it pertains to undocumented students, their experience of their unequal access to dual or concurrent enrollment, the disconnect they have felt from their "documented" peers, and the emotional impact they have felt as a result of this law. Among the findings, the potential impact of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), enacted in August 2012, is explored.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

151525-Thumbnail Image.png

Using lesson study with preservice secondary mathematics teachers: effects on instruction, planning, and efficacy to teach mathematics

Description

ABSTRACT There is a continuing emphasis in the United States to improve student's mathematical abilities and one approach is to better prepare teachers. This study investigated the effects of using

ABSTRACT There is a continuing emphasis in the United States to improve student's mathematical abilities and one approach is to better prepare teachers. This study investigated the effects of using lesson study with preservice secondary mathematics teachers to improve their proficiency at planning and implementing instruction. The participants were students (preservice teachers) in an undergraduate teacher preparation program at a private university who were enrolled in a mathematics methods course for secondary math teachers. This project used lesson study to engage preservice teachers in collaboratively creating lessons, field testing them, using feedback to revise the lessons, and re-teaching the revised lesson. The preservice teachers worked through multiple cycles of the process in their secondary math methods class receiving feedback from their peers and instructor prior to teaching the lessons in their field experience (practicum). A mixed methods approach was implemented to investigate the preservice teacher's abilities to plan and implement instruction as well as their efficacy for teaching. Data were collected from surveys, video analysis, student reflections, and semi-structured interviews. The findings from this study indicate that lesson study for preservice teachers was an effective means of teacher education. Lesson study positively impacted the preservice teachers' ability to plan and teach mathematical lessons more effectively. The preservice teachers successfully transitioned from teaching in the methods classroom to their field experience classroom during this innovation. Further, the efficacy of the preservice teachers to teach secondary mathematics increased based on this innovation. Further action research cycles of lesson study with preservice teachers are recommended.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

151650-Thumbnail Image.png

Assessment of a model for the evaluation of professional non-instruction staff in elementary schools

Description

The purpose of this study was to help improve the evaluation system for school counselors and school psychologists, or non-instructional, certified staff (NICS). A mixed methodology approach was used to

The purpose of this study was to help improve the evaluation system for school counselors and school psychologists, or non-instructional, certified staff (NICS). A mixed methodology approach was used to describe the existing evaluation system used to evaluate NICS; to develop a new system of evaluation based on recent research; and to determine how administrators, NICS, and experts in the field will respond to this new evaluation system that can assess both school counselors and school psychologists. This study employed change theory to bring about change within a single school district by assessing current practices in the evaluation of NICS, developing a new evaluation system for implementation in the district, and evaluating that system to refine it before full implementation. The study found that administrators did not hold a positive opinion of the current evaluation system's accuracy in assessing NICS, thereby promoting a reason for change. The results of this research suggest that the new system would enhance performance, improve support services, clarify goals and expectations, and provide appropriate and accurate feedback on performance. The findings indicate that the participants responded positively to the new evaluation system, and they hold a more positive opinion of the new system. The majority agreed the current system should be replaced with the new system. The recommendations of this study include developing action plans which follow from applying an action change model to the implementation of the new NICS evaluation system. In addition, in order for the system to evolve it must be piloted, continuing the action research process to revise the system as the implementation process is monitored and evaluated.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013